Anatole Broyard

Born: July 16, 1920

Die: October 11, 1990

Occupation: Writer

Quotes of Anatole Broyard

Anatole Broyard

The more I like a book, the more slowly I read. this spontaneous talking back to a book is one of the things that makes reading so valuable.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

The more I like a book, the more reluctant I am to turn the page. Lovers, even book lovers, tend to cling. No one-night stands or "reads" for them.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

To be misunderstood can be the writer's punishment for having disturbed the reader's peace. The greater the disturbance, the greater the possibility of misunderstanding.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

There was a time when we expected nothing of our children but obedience, as opposed to the present, when we expect everything of them but obedience.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

For years they have been using the role of 'sex object' as a cover while they spied out the land.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

When friends stop being frank and useful to each other, the whole world loses some of its radiance.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

Either a writer doesn't want to talk about his work, or he talks about it more than you want.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

Sex almost always disappoints me in novels. Everything can be said or done now, and that's what I often find: everything, a feeling of generality or dispersal. But in my experience, true sex is so particular,...

Read more


Anatole Broyard

In an age like ours, which is not given to letter-writing, we forget what an important part it used to play in people's lives.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

People ... have no idea what a hard job it is for two writers to be friends. Sooner or later you have to talk about each other's work.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

Paranoids are the only ones who notice things anymore.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

The moment a book is lent I begin to miss it.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

I feel about lending a book the way most fathers feel about their daughters living with a man out of wedlock.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

The contents of someone's bookcase are part of his history, like an ancestral portrait.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

A bookcase is as good as a view, as much of a panorama as the sight of a city or a river. There are dawns and sunsets in books - storms and zephyrs.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

The tension between 'yes' and no', between 'I can' and 'I cannot,' makes us feel that, in so many instances, human life is an interminable debate with one's self.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

In novels, I said, people are transfigured by love. They’re elevated, made different, lifted out of their ordinariness…It’s not so much to ask, I said. I just want love to live up to its publicity.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

To choose a writer for a friend is like palling around with your cardiologist, who might be musing as you talk to him that you are a sinking man. A writer's love for another writer is never quite free...

Read more


Anatole Broyard

Aphorisms are bad for novels. They stick in the reader's teeth.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

It is one of the paradoxes of American literature that our writers are forever looking back with love and nostalgia at lives they couldn't wait to leave.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

The epic implications of being human end in more than this: We start our lives as if they were momentous stories, with a beginning, a middle and an appropriate end, only to find that they are mostly middles.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

A book is meant not only to be read, but to haunt you, to importune you like a lover or a parent, to be in your teeth like a piece of gristle.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

Two people making love, she once said, are like one drowned person resuscitating the other.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

If a book is really good, it deserves to be read again, and if it's great, it should be read at least three times.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

We are all tourists in history, and irony is what we win in wars.

Read more


Anatole Broyard

There is something about seeing real people on a stage that makes a bad play more intimately, more personally offensive than any other art form.

Read more


“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss