Anne Bronte

Born: January 17, 1820

Die: May 28, 1849

Occupation: Novelist

Quotes of Anne Bronte

Anne Bronte

No, thank you, I don't mind the rain,' I said. I always lacked common sense when taken by surprise.

Read more


Anne Bronte

My soul is awakened, my spirit is soaring and carried aloft on the wings of the breeze.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Farewell to Thee! But not farewell To all my fondest thoughts of Thee; Within my heart they still shall dwell And they shall cheer and comfort me.

Read more


Anne Bronte

No generous mind delights to oppress the weak, but rather to cherish and protect.

Read more


Anne Bronte

if I hate the sins, I love the sinner, and would do much for his salvation

Read more


Anne Bronte

I cannot get him to write or speak in real, solid earnest. I don't much mind it now, but if it be always so, what shall I do with the serious part of myself?

Read more


Anne Bronte

He is very fond of me, almost too fond. I could do with less caressing and more rationality. I should like to be less of a pet and more of a friend, if I might choose; but I won't complain of that: I am...

Read more


Anne Bronte

I will give my whole heart and soul to my Maker if I can,' I answered, 'and not one atom more of it to you than He allows. What are you, sir, that you should set yourself up as a god, and presume to dispute...

Read more


Anne Bronte

You may think it all very fine, Mr. Huntingdon, to amuse yourself with rousing my jealousy; but take care you don't rouse my hate instead. And when you have once extinguished my love, you will find it...

Read more


Anne Bronte

My heart is too thoroughly dried to be broken in a hurry, and I mean to live as long as I can.

Read more


Anne Bronte

When I tell you not to marry without love, I do not advise you to marry for love alone: there are many, many other things to be considered. Keep both heart and hand in your own possession, till you see...

Read more


Anne Bronte

I was sorry for her; I was amazed, disgusted at her heartless vanity; I wondered why so much beauty should be given to those who made so bad a use of it, and denied to some who would make it a benefit...

Read more


Anne Bronte

It is better to arm and strengthen your hero, than to disarm and enfeeble your foe.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Then, you must fall each into your proper place. You'll do your business, and she, if she's worthy of you, will do hers; but it's your business to please yourself, and hers to please you.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Keep guard over your eyes and ears as the inlets of your heart, and over your lips as the outlets, lest they betray you in a moment of unwariness.

Read more


Anne Bronte

No; for instead of delivering myself up to the full enjoyment of the as others do, I am always troubling my head about how I could produce the same effect upon canvas; and as that can never be done, it...

Read more


Anne Bronte

He had not breathed a word of love, or dropped one hint of tenderness or affection, and yet I had been supremely happy. To be near him, to hear him talk as he did talk, and to feel that he thought me worthy...

Read more


Anne Bronte

Because I imagine there must be only a very, very few men in the world, that I should like to marry; and of those few, it is ten to one I may never be acquainted with one; or if I should, it is twenty...

Read more


Anne Bronte

He never could have loved me, or he would not have resigned me so willingly

Read more


Anne Bronte

I was not really angry: I felt for him all the time, and longed to be reconciled; but I determined he should make the first advances, or at least show some signs of an humble and contrite spirit, first;...

Read more


Anne Bronte

All true histories contain instruction; though, in some, the treasure may be hard to find, and when found, so trivial in quantity, that the dry, shriveled kernel scarcely compensates for the trouble of...

Read more


Anne Bronte

What business had I to think of one that never thought of me?

Read more


Anne Bronte

I love the silent hour of night, for blissful dreams may then arise, revealing to my charmed sight what may not bless my waking eyes.

Read more


Anne Bronte

The ties that bind us to life are tougher than you imagine, or than any one can who has not felt how roughly they may be pulled without breaking.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Oh, I am very weary, Though tears no longer flow; My eyes are tired of weeping, My heart is sick of woe.

Read more


Anne Bronte

A light wind swept over the corn, and all nature laughed in the sunshine.

Read more


Anne Bronte

But he that dares not grasp the thorn Should never crave the rose.

Read more


Anne Bronte

I would not send a poor girl into the world, ignorant of the snares that beset her path; nor would I watch and guard her, till, deprived of self-respect and self-reliance, she lost the power or the will...

Read more


Anne Bronte

If you would have your son to walk honourably through the world, you must not attempt to clear the stones from his path, but teach him to walk firmly over them - not insist upon leading him by the hand,...

Read more


Anne Bronte

His heart was like a sensitive plant, that opens for a moment in the sunshine, but curls up and shrinks into itself at the slightest touch of the finger, or the lightest breath of wind.

Read more


Anne Bronte

I see that a man cannot give himself up to drinking without being miserable one half his days and mad the other.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Beauty is that quality which, next to money, is generally the most attractive to the worst kinds of men; and, therefore, it is likely to entail a great deal of trouble on the possessor.

Read more


Anne Bronte

I began this book with the intention of concealing nothing, that those who liked might have the benefit of perusing a fellow creature's heart: but we have some thoughts that all the angels in heaven are...

Read more


Anne Bronte

I still preserve those relics of past sufferings and experience, like pillars of witness set up in travelling through the valve of life, to mark particular occurrences. The footsteps are obliterated now;...

Read more


Anne Bronte

She left me, offended at my want of sympathy, and thinking, no doubt, that I envied her. I did not - at least, I firmly believed I did not.

Read more


Anne Bronte

But, God knows best, I concluded.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Reading is my favourite occupation, when I have leisure for it and books to read.

Read more


Anne Bronte

A little girl loves her bird--Why? Because it lives and feels; because it is helpless and harmless? A toad, likewise, lives and feels, and is equally helpless and harmless; but though she would not hurt...

Read more


Anne Bronte

There is always a but in this imperfect world.

Read more


Anne Bronte

I had been seasoned by adversity, and tutored by experience, and I longed to redeem my lost honour in the eyes of those whose opinion was more than that of all the world to me.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Chess-players are so unsociable, they are no company for any but themselves.

Read more


Anne Bronte

I wished to tell the truth, for truth always conveys its own moral to those who are able to receive it.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Are you hero enough to unite yourself to one whom you know to be suspected and despised by all around you, and identify your interests and your honor with hers?

Read more


Anne Bronte

Thank heaven, I am free and safe at last!

Read more


Anne Bronte

Yet, should thy darkest fears be true, If Heaven be so severe, That such a soul as thine is lost, Oh! how shall I appear?

Read more


Anne Bronte

I may be permitted, like the doctors, to cure a greater evil by a less, for I shall not fall seriously in love with the young widow, I think, nor she with me - that's certain - but if I find a little pleasure...

Read more


Anne Bronte

Preserve me from such cordiality! It is like handling briar-roses and may-blossoms - bright enough to the eye, and outwardly soft to the touch, but you know there are thorns beneath, and every now and...

Read more


Anne Bronte

What the world stigmatizes as romantic is often more nearly allied to the truth than is commonly supposed.

Read more


Anne Bronte

This paper will serve instead of a confidential friend into whose ear I might pour forth the overflowings of my heart. It will not sympathize with my distresses, but then, it will not laugh at them, and,...

Read more


Anne Bronte

The end of Religion is not to teach us how to die, but how to live....

Read more


Anne Bronte

Adieu! but let me cherish, still, The hope with which I cannot part. Contempt may wound, and coldness chill, But still it lingers in my heart. And who can tell but Heaven, at last, May answer all my thousand...

Read more


Anne Bronte

I’ll promise to think twice before I take any important step you seriously disapprove of.

Read more


Anne Bronte

When a lady condescends to apologise, there is no keeping one’s anger.

Read more


Anne Bronte

If we can only speak to slander our betters, let us hold our tongues.

Read more


Anne Bronte

I thought Mr. Millward never would cease telling us that he was no tea-drinker, and that it was highly injurious to keep loading the stomach with slops to the exclusion of more wholesome sustenance, and...

Read more


Anne Bronte

I possess the faculty of enjoying the company of those I - of my friends as well in silence as in conversation.

Read more


Anne Bronte

I am satisfied that if a book is a good one, it is so whatever the sex of the author may be. All novels are or should be written for both men and women to read, and I am at a loss to conceive how a man...

Read more


Anne Bronte

I would rather have your friendship than the love of any other woman in the world.

Read more


Anne Bronte

You need not fear me, for I not only should think it wrong to marry a man that was deficient in sense or in principle, but I should never be tempted to do it; for I could not like him, if he were ever...

Read more


Anne Bronte

And why should he interest himself at all in my moral and intellectual capacities: what is it to him what I think and feel?' I asked myself. And my heart throbbed in answer to the question.

Read more


Anne Bronte

You cannot expect stone to be as pliable as clay.

Read more


Anne Bronte

To represent a bad thing in its least offensive light is, doubtless, the most agreeable course for a writer of fiction to pursue; but is it the most honest, or the safest? Is it better to reveal the snares...

Read more


Anne Bronte

There is such a thing as looking through a person's eyes into the heart, and learning more of the height, and breadth, and depth of another's soul in one hour than it might take you a lifetime to discover,...

Read more


Anne Bronte

Is it that they think it a duty to be continually talking,' pursued she: 'and so never pause to think, but fill up with aimless trifles and vain repetitions when subjects of real interest fail to present...

Read more


Anne Bronte

I cannot love a man who cannot protect me.

Read more


Anne Bronte

It is foolish to wish for beauty. Sensible people never either desire it for themselves or care about it in others. If the mind be but well cultivated, and the heart well disposed, no one ever cares for...

Read more


Anne Bronte

All our talents increase in the using, and every faculty, both good and bad, strengthens by exercise.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Well, but you affirm that virtue is only elicited by temptation; - and you think that a woman cannot be too little exposed to temptation, or too little acquainted with vice, or anything connected therewith...

Read more


Anne Bronte

What a fool you must be," said my head to my heart, or my sterner to my softer self.

Read more


Anne Bronte

Increase of love brings increase of happiness, when it is mutual, and pure as that will be.

Read more


Anne Bronte

To regret the exchange of earthly pleasures for the joys of Heaven, is as if the grovelling caterpillar should lament that it must one day quit the nibbled leaf to soar aloft and flutter through the air,...

Read more


Anne Bronte

There's nothing like active employment, I suppose, to console the afflicted.

Read more


Anne Bronte

But smiles and tears are so alike with me, they are neither of them confined to any particular feelings: I often cry when I am happy, and smile when I am sad.

Read more


“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss