Aristotle

Born: 384 BC

Die: 322 BC

Occupation: Philosopher

Quotes of Aristotle

Aristotle

Men regard it as their right to return evil for evil and, if they cannot, feel they have lost their liberty.

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Aristotle

Those who have the command of the arms in a country are masters of the state, and have it in their power to make what revolutions they please. [Thus,] there is no end to observations on the difference...

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Aristotle

The things best to know are first principles and causes, but these things are perhaps the most difficult for men to grasp, for they are farthest removed from the senses ...

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Aristotle

A good style must have an air of novelty, at the same time concealing its art.

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Aristotle

It was through the feeling of wonder that men now and at first began to philosophize.

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Aristotle

What soon grows old? Gratitude.

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Aristotle

It is impossible, or not easy, to alter by argument what has long been absorbed by habit

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Aristotle

He is his own best friend and takes delight in privacy whereas the man of no virtue or ability is his own worst enemy and is afraid of solitude.

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Aristotle

The mathematical sciences particularly exhibit order symmetry and limitations; and these are the greatest forms of the beautiful.

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Aristotle

The guest will judge better of a feast than the cook

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Aristotle

He who cannot be a good follower cannot be a good leader.

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Aristotle

Excellence is never an accident. It is always the result of high intention, sincere effort, and intelligent execution; it represents the wise choice of many alternatives - choice, not chance, determines...

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Aristotle

Boundaries don't protect rivers, people do.

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Aristotle

Humor is the only test of gravity, and gravity of humor; for a subject which will not bear raillery is suspicious, and a jest which will not bear serious examination is false wit.

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Aristotle

Since the branch of philosophy on which we are at present engaged differs from the others in not being a subject of merely intellectual interest — I mean we are not concerned to know what goodness essentially...

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Aristotle

If you would understand anything, observe its beginning and its development

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Aristotle

To love someone is to identify with them.

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Aristotle

Sophocles said he drew men as they ought to be, and Euripides as they were.

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Aristotle

Evil draws men together.

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Aristotle

It's the fastest who gets paid, and it's the fastest who gets laid.

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Aristotle

Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.

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Aristotle

Hope is a waking dream.

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Aristotle

Anybody can become angry - that is easy, but to be angry with the right person and to the right degree and at the right time and for the right purpose, and in the right way - that is not within everybody's...

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Aristotle

A friend to all is a friend to none.

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Aristotle

Friendship is a single soul dwelling in two bodies.

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Aristotle

We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.

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Aristotle

It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.

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Aristotle

The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.

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Aristotle

My best friend is the man who in wishing me well wishes it for my sake.

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Aristotle

The most perfect political community is one in which the middle class is in control, and outnumbers both of the other classes.

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Aristotle

Those who educate children well are more to be honored than they who produce them; for these only gave them life, those the art of living well.

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Aristotle

You will never do anything in this world without courage. It is the greatest quality of the mind next to honor.

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Aristotle

Happiness depends upon ourselves.

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Aristotle

I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who conquers his enemies; for the hardest victory is over self.

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Aristotle

The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.

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Aristotle

Democracy is when the indigent, and not the men of property, are the rulers.

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Aristotle

Suffering becomes beautiful when anyone bears great calamities with cheerfulness, not through insensibility but through greatness of mind.

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Aristotle

Quality is not an act, it is a habit.

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Aristotle

All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.

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Aristotle

Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence,...

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Aristotle

At his best, man is the noblest of all animals; separated from law and justice he is the worst.

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Aristotle

Wishing to be friends is quick work, but friendship is a slow ripening fruit.

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Aristotle

The worst form of inequality is to try to make unequal things equal.

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Aristotle

The ultimate value of life depends upon awareness and the power of contemplation rather than upon mere survival.

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Aristotle

There is no great genius without a mixture of madness.

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Aristotle

The energy of the mind is the essence of life.

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Aristotle

Mothers are fonder than fathers of their children because they are more certain they are their own.

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Aristotle

The aim of the wise is not to secure pleasure, but to avoid pain.

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Aristotle

In a democracy the poor will have more power than the rich, because there are more of them, and the will of the majority is supreme.

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Aristotle

Jealousy is both reasonable and belongs to reasonable men, while envy is base and belongs to the base, for the one makes himself get good things by jealousy, while the other does not allow his neighbour...

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Aristotle

No excellent soul is exempt from a mixture of madness.

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Aristotle

Those that know, do. Those that understand, teach.

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Aristotle

Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god.

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Aristotle

He who hath many friends hath none.

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Aristotle

Good habits formed at youth make all the difference.

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Aristotle

What it lies in our power to do, it lies in our power not to do.

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Aristotle

Fear is pain arising from the anticipation of evil.

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Aristotle

The ideal man bears the accidents of life with dignity and grace, making the best of circumstances.

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Aristotle

The law is reason, free from passion.

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Aristotle

Pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.

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Aristotle

Education is an ornament in prosperity and a refuge in adversity.

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Aristotle

A tyrant must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler whom they consider god-fearing and pious. On the other hand, they...

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Aristotle

The soul never thinks without a picture.

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Aristotle

Courage is the first of human qualities because it is the quality which guarantees the others.

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Aristotle

Both oligarch and tyrant mistrust the people, and therefore deprive them of their arms.

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Aristotle

Moral excellence comes about as a result of habit. We become just by doing just acts, temperate by doing temperate acts, brave by doing brave acts.

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Aristotle

All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.

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Aristotle

The one exclusive sign of thorough knowledge is the power of teaching.

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Aristotle

Change in all things is sweet.

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Aristotle

Politicians also have no leisure, because they are always aiming at something beyond political life itself, power and glory, or happiness.

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Aristotle

Character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion.

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Aristotle

Wit is educated insolence.

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Aristotle

Poetry is finer and more philosophical than history; for poetry expresses the universal, and history only the particular.

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Aristotle

Republics decline into democracies and democracies degenerate into despotisms.

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Aristotle

Hope is the dream of a waking man.

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Aristotle

Youth is easily deceived because it is quick to hope.

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Aristotle

All men by nature desire knowledge.

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Aristotle

Dignity does not consist in possessing honors, but in deserving them.

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Aristotle

Plato is dear to me, but dearer still is truth.

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Aristotle

The educated differ from the uneducated as much as the living from the dead.

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Aristotle

In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.

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Aristotle

Those who assert that the mathematical sciences say nothing of the beautiful or the good are in error. For these sciences say and prove a great deal about them; if they do not expressly mention them, but...

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Aristotle

I have gained this from philosophy: that I do without being commanded what others do only from fear of the law.

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Aristotle

The secret to humor is surprise.

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Aristotle

Bring your desires down to your present means. Increase them only when your increased means permit.

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Aristotle

Man is by nature a political animal.

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Aristotle

In poverty and other misfortunes of life, true friends are a sure refuge. The young they keep out of mischief; to the old they are a comfort and aid in their weakness, and those in the prime of life they...

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Aristotle

For though we love both the truth and our friends, piety requires us to honor the truth first.

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Aristotle

Bad men are full of repentance.

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Aristotle

Well begun is half done.

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Aristotle

The end of labor is to gain leisure.

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Aristotle

It is best to rise from life as from a banquet, neither thirsty nor drunken.

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Aristotle

A tragedy is a representation of an action that is whole and complete and of a certain magnitude. A whole is what has a beginning and middle and end.

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Aristotle

Misfortune shows those who are not really friends.

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Aristotle

A great city is not to be confounded with a populous one.

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Aristotle

For one swallow does not make a summer, nor does one day; and so too one day, or a short time, does not make a man blessed and happy.

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Aristotle

The greatest virtues are those which are most useful to other persons.

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Aristotle

A constitution is the arrangement of magistracies in a state.

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Aristotle

If one way be better than another, that you may be sure is nature's way.

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Aristotle

No one would choose a friendless existence on condition of having all the other things in the world.

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Aristotle

Of all the varieties of virtues, liberalism is the most beloved.

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Aristotle

We make war that we may live in peace.

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Aristotle

Men create gods after their own image, not only with regard to their form but with regard to their mode of life.

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Aristotle

Those who excel in virtue have the best right of all to rebel, but then they are of all men the least inclined to do so.

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Aristotle

Therefore, the good of man must be the end of the science of politics.

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Aristotle

Friendship is essentially a partnership.

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Aristotle

Men acquire a particular quality by constantly acting in a particular way.

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Aristotle

Courage is a mean with regard to fear and confidence.

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Aristotle

The virtue of justice consists in moderation, as regulated by wisdom.

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Aristotle

He who is to be a good ruler must have first been ruled.

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Aristotle

The young are permanently in a state resembling intoxication.

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Aristotle

Even when laws have been written down, they ought not always to remain unaltered.

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Aristotle

Thou wilt find rest from vain fancies if thou doest every act in life as though it were thy last.

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Aristotle

Education is the best provision for old age.

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Aristotle

Accordingly, the poet should prefer probable impossibilities to improbable possibilities. The tragic plot must not be composed of irrational parts.

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Aristotle

Nature does nothing in vain.

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Aristotle

The least initial deviation from the truth is multiplied later a thousandfold.

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Aristotle

It is not once nor twice but times without number that the same ideas make their appearance in the world.

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Aristotle

The whole is more than the sum of its parts.

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Aristotle

Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.

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Aristotle

No one loves the man whom he fears.

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Aristotle

All virtue is summed up in dealing justly.

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Aristotle

For as the eyes of bats are to the blaze of day, so is the reason in our soul to the things which are by nature most evident of all.

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Aristotle

Bashfulness is an ornament to youth, but a reproach to old age.

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Aristotle

Inferiors revolt in order that they may be equal, and equals that they may be superior. Such is the state of mind which creates revolutions.

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Aristotle

We become just by performing just action, temperate by performing temperate actions, brave by performing brave action.

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Aristotle

No notice is taken of a little evil, but when it increases it strikes the eye.

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Aristotle

Most people would rather give than get affection.

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Aristotle

Men are swayed more by fear than by reverence.

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Aristotle

The state comes into existence for the sake of life and continues to exist for the sake of good life.

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Aristotle

We must no more ask whether the soul and body are one than ask whether the wax and the figure impressed on it are one.

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Aristotle

It is Homer who has chiefly taught other poets the art of telling lies skillfully.

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Aristotle

Temperance is a mean with regard to pleasures.

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Aristotle

The gods too are fond of a joke.

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Aristotle

It is unbecoming for young men to utter maxims.

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Aristotle

He who can be, and therefore is, another's, and he who participates in reason enough to apprehend, but not to have, is a slave by nature.

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Aristotle

The wise man does not expose himself needlessly to danger, since there are few things for which he cares sufficiently; but he is willing, in great crises, to give even his life - knowing that under certain...

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Aristotle

If liberty and equality, as is thought by some, are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in government to the utmost.

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Aristotle

It is just that we should be grateful, not only to those with whose views we may agree, but also to those who have expressed more superficial views; for these also contributed something, by developing...

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Aristotle

In making a speech one must study three points: first, the means of producing persuasion; second, the language; third the proper arrangement of the various parts of the speech.

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Aristotle

To run away from trouble is a form of cowardice and, while it is true that the suicide braves death, he does it not for some noble object but to escape some ill.

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Aristotle

A sense is what has the power of receiving into itself the sensible forms of things without the matter, in the way in which a piece of wax takes on the impress of a signet-ring without the iron or gold.

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Aristotle

Democracy arises out of the notion that those who are equal in any respect are equal in all respects; because men are equally free, they claim to be absolutely equal.

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Aristotle

Perfect friendship is the friendship of men who are good, and alike in excellence; for these wish well alike to each other qua good, and they are good in themselves.

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Aristotle

We praise a man who feels angry on the right grounds and against the right persons and also in the right manner at the right moment and for the right length of time.

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Aristotle

Every art and every inquiry, and similarly every action and choice, is thought to aim at some good; and for this reason the good has rightly been declared to be that at which all things aim.

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Aristotle

Different men seek after happiness in different ways and by different means, and so make for themselves different modes of life and forms of government.

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Aristotle

Excellence, then, is a state concerned with choice, lying in a mean, relative to us, this being determined by reason and in the way in which the man of practical wisdom would determine it.

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Aristotle

What the statesman is most anxious to produce is a certain moral character in his fellow citizens, namely a disposition to virtue and the performance of virtuous actions.

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Aristotle

But if nothing but soul, or in soul mind, is qualified to count, it is impossible for there to be time unless there is soul, but only that of which time is an attribute, i.e. if change can exist without...

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Aristotle

The moral virtues, then, are produced in us neither by nature nor against nature. Nature, indeed, prepares in us the ground for their reception, but their complete formation is the product of habit.

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Aristotle

It is clearly better that property should be private, but the use of it common; and the special business of the legislator is to create in men this benevolent disposition.

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Aristotle

The beginning of reform is not so much to equalize property as to train the noble sort of natures not to desire more, and to prevent the lower from getting more.

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Aristotle

The generality of men are naturally apt to be swayed by fear rather than reverence, and to refrain from evil rather because of the punishment that it brings than because of its own foulness.

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Aristotle

Whether if soul did not exist time would exist or not, is a question that may fairly be asked; for if there cannot be someone to count there cannot be anything that can be counted, so that evidently there...

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Aristotle

Hence poetry is something more philosophic and of graver import than history, since its statements are rather of the nature of universals, whereas those of history are singulars.

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Aristotle

It is simplicity that makes the uneducated more effective than the educated when addressing popular audiences.

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Aristotle

Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.

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Aristotle

The high-minded man must care more for the truth than for what people think.

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Aristotle

Praise invariably implies a reference to a higher standard.

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Aristotle

Quitting smoking is rather a marathon than a sprint. It is not a one-time attempt, but a longer effort

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Aristotle

Today you can start forming habits for overcoming all obstacles in life... even nicotine cravings

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Aristotle

Those who are not angry at the things they should be angry at are thought to be fools, and so are those who are not angry in the right way, at the right time, or with the right persons.

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Aristotle

Art is identical with a state of capacity to make, involving a true course of reasoning.

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Aristotle

Either a beast or a god.

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Aristotle

What we expect, that we find.

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Aristotle

Life is full of chances and changes, and the most prosperous of men may in the evening of his days meet with great misfortunes.

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Aristotle

One thing alone not even God can do,To make undone whatever hath been done.

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Aristotle

Female cats are very Lascivious, and make advances to the male.

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Aristotle

Anyone who has no need of anybody but himself is either a beast or a God.

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Aristotle

That in the soul which is called the mind is, before it thinks, not actually any real thing.

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Aristotle

The beauty of the soul shines out when a man bears with composure one heavy mischance after another, not because he does not feel them, but because he is a man of high and heroic temper.

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Aristotle

To be angry is easy. But to be angry with the right man at the right time and in the right manner, that is not easy.

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Aristotle

Meanness is incurable; it cannot be cured by old age, or by anything else.

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Aristotle

A whole is that which has a beginning, a middle and an end.

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Aristotle

The beginning, as the proverb says, is half the whole.

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Aristotle

Victory is plesant, not only to those who love to conquer, bot to all; for there is produced an idea of superiority, which all with more or less eagerness desire.

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Aristotle

Youth should stay away from all evil, especially things that produce wickedness and ill-will.

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Aristotle

There are no experienced young people. Time makes experience.

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Aristotle

In educating the young we steer them by the rudders of pleasure and pain

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Aristotle

In cases of this sort, let us say adultery, rightness and wrongness do not depend on committing it with the right woman at the right time and in the right manner, but the mere fact of committing such action...

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Aristotle

Human good turns out to be activity of soul exhibiting excellence, and if there is more than one sort of excellence, in accordance with the best and most complete.Foroneswallowdoesnot makea summer, nor...

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Aristotle

Remember that time slurs over everything, let all deeds fade, blurs all writings and kills all memories. Exempt are only those which dig into the hearts of men by love.

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Aristotle

For man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but, when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all; since armed injustice is the more dangerous, and he is equipped at birth with the arms...

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Aristotle

The goal of war is peace, of business, leisure

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Aristotle

All men desire by nature to know.

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Aristotle

First, have a definite, clear practical ideal; a goal, an objective. Second, have the necessary means to achieve your ends; wisdom, money, materials, and methods. Third, adjust all your means to that end.

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Aristotle

Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence.

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Aristotle

Criticism is something we can avoid easily by saying nothing, doing nothing, and being nothing.

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Aristotle

I say that habit's but a long practice, friend, and this becomes men's nature in the end.

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Aristotle

He overcomes a stout enemy who overcomes his own anger.

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Aristotle

It is of the nature of desire not to be satisfied, and most men live only for the gratification of it.

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Aristotle

Tragedy is an imitation not of men but of a life, an action

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Aristotle

The specific excellence of verbal expression in poetry is to be clear without being low.

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Aristotle

Law is order, and good law is good order.

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Aristotle

I will not allow the Athenians to sin twice against philosophy,

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Aristotle

You are what you do repeatedly,

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Aristotle

How many a dispute could have been deflated into a single paragraph if the disputants had dared to define their terms

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Aristotle

We are what we do. Excellence, therefore, is not an act, but a habit.

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Aristotle

Memory is the scribe of the soul.

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Aristotle

The true end of tragedy is to purify the passions.

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Aristotle

. . . the man is free, we say, who exists for his own sake and not for another's.

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Aristotle

. . . Political society exists for the sake of noble actions, and not of mere companionship.

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Aristotle

We are what we repeatedly do.

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Aristotle

The life of money-making is one undertaken under compulsion, and wealth is evidently not the good we are seeking; for it is merely useful and for the sake of something else.

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Aristotle

Teachers, who educate children, deserve more honour than parents, who merely gave them birth; for the latter provided mere life, while the former ensure a good life.

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Aristotle

Personal beauty is a greater recommendation than any letter of reference.

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Aristotle

Health is a matter of choice, not a mystery of chance

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Aristotle

Happiness is something final and complete in itself, as being the aim and end of all practical activities whatever .... Happiness then we define as the active exercise of the mind in conformity with perfect...

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Aristotle

Happiness is an expression of the soul in considered actions.

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Aristotle

He who has never learned to obey cannot be a good commander.

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Aristotle

A change in the shape of the body creates a change in the state of the soul.

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Aristotle

And of course, the brain is not responsible for any of the sensations at all. The correct view is that the seat and source of sensation is the region of the heart.

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Aristotle

We become brave by doing brave acts.

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Aristotle

Character is revealed through action.

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Aristotle

The coward calls the brave man rash, the rash man calls him a coward.

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Aristotle

...happiness does not consist in amusement. In fact, it would be strange if our end were amusement, and if we were to labor and suffer hardships all our life long merely to amuse ourselves.... The happy...

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Aristotle

The habits we form from childhood make no small difference, but rather they make all the difference.

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Aristotle

The best way to teach morality is to make it a habit with children.

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Aristotle

Equality consists in the same treatment of similar persons.

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Aristotle

Humility is a flower which does not grow in everyone's garden.

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Aristotle

Modesty is hardly to be described as a virtue. It is a feeling rather than a disposition. It is a kind of fear of falling into disrepute.

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Aristotle

Good has two meanings: it means that which is good absolutely and that which is good for somebody.

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Aristotle

There are some jobs in which it is impossible for a man to be virtuous.

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Aristotle

Happiness is the highest good

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Aristotle

Happiness lies in virtuous activity, and perfect happiness lies in the best activity, which is contemplative

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Aristotle

for we are inquiring not in order to know what virtue is, but in order to become good, since otherwise our inquiry would have been of no use

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Aristotle

If things do not turn out as we wish, we should wish for them as they turn out.

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Aristotle

It is not enough to win a war; it is more important to organize the peace.

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Aristotle

The least deviation from truth will be multiplied later.

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Aristotle

Only an armed people can be truly free. Only an unarmed people can ever be enslaved.

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Aristotle

Even the best of men in authority are liable to be corrupted by passion. We may conclude then that the law is reason without passion, and it is therefore preferable to any individual.

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Aristotle

Neither old people nor sour people seem to make friends easily; for there is little that is pleasant in them...

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Aristotle

Music has the power of producing a certain effect on the moral character of the soul, and if it has the power to do this, it is clear that the young must be directed to music and must be educated in it.

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Aristotle

The Good of man is the active exercise of his soul's faculties in conformity with excellence or virtue, or if there be several human excellences or virtues, in conformity with the best and most perfect...

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Aristotle

Justice is that virtue of the soul which is distributive according to desert.

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Aristotle

We can do noble acts without ruling the earth and sea.

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Aristotle

Hence intellect[ual perception] is both a beginning and an end, for the demonstrations arise from these, and concern them. As a result, one ought to pay attention to the undemonstrated assertions and opinions...

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Aristotle

He who has conferred a benefit on anyone from motives of love or honor will feel pain, if he sees that the benefit is received without gratitude.

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Aristotle

To give away money is an easy matter and in any man's power. But to decide to whom to give it and how large and when, and for what purpose and how, is neither in every man's power nor an easy matter.

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Aristotle

Yet the true friend of the people should see that they be not too poor, for extreme povery lowers the character of the democracy; measures therefore should be taken which will give them lasting prosperity;...

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Aristotle

To appreciate the beauty of a snow flake, it is necessary to stand out in the cold.

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Aristotle

The only stable state is the one in which all men are equal before the law.

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Aristotle

It is not always the same thing to be a good man and a good citizen.

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Aristotle

Time crumbles things; everything grows old under the power of Time and is forgotten through the lapse of Time.

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Aristotle

All persons ought to endeavor to follow what is right, and not what is established.

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Aristotle

Emotions of any kind can be evoked by melody and rhythm; therefore music has the power to form character.

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Aristotle

The man who is truly good and wise will bear with dignity whatever fortune sends, and will always make the best of his circumstances.

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Aristotle

Education begins at the level of the learner.

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Aristotle

There is a foolish corner in the brain of the wisest man.

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Aristotle

Intuition is the source of scientific knowledge.

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Aristotle

For knowing is spoken of in three ways: it may be either universal knowledge or knowledge proper to the matter in hand or actualising such knowledge; consequently three kinds of error also are possible.

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Aristotle

All teaching and all intellectual learning come about from already existing knowledge.

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Aristotle

All men naturally desire knowledge. An indication of this is our esteem for the senses; for apart from their use we esteem them for their own sake, and most of all the sense of sight. Not only with a view...

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Aristotle

Every rascal is not a thief, but every thief is a rascal.

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Aristotle

Fortune favours the bold.

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Aristotle

A friend is another I.

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Aristotle

Of ill-temper there are three kinds: irascibility, bitterness, sullenness. It belongs to the ill-tempered man to be unable to bear either small slights or defeats but to be given to retaliation and revenge,...

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Aristotle

If the art of ship-building were in the wood, ships would exist by nature.

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Aristotle

In order to be effective you need not only virtue but also mental strength.

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Aristotle

Gentleness is the ability to bear reproaches and slights with moderation, and not to embark on revenge quickly, and not to be easily provoked to anger, but be free from bitterness and contentiousness,...

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Aristotle

Goodness is to do good to the deserving and love the good and hate the wicked, and not to be eager to inflict punishment or take vengeance, but to be gracious and kindly and forgiving.

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Aristotle

There is a cropping-time in the races of men, as in the fruits of the field; and sometimes, if the stock be good, there springs up for a time a succession of splendid men; and then comes a period of barrenness.

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Aristotle

This world is inescapably linked to the motions of the worlds above. All power in this world is ruled by these options.

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Aristotle

Talent is culture with insolence.

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Aristotle

There is honor in being a dog.

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Aristotle

It is of itself that the divine thought thinks (since it is the most excellent of things), and its thinking is a thinking on thinking.

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Aristotle

Between husband and wife friendship seems to exist by nature, for man is naturally disposed to pairing.

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Aristotle

Money is a guarantee that we may have what we want in the future. Though we need nothing at the moment it insures the possibility of satisfying a new desire when it arises.

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Aristotle

You are what you repeatedly do

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Aristotle

Democracy arose from men's thinking that if they are equal in any respect, they are equal absolutely.

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Aristotle

All human happiness and misery take the form of action.

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Aristotle

If then nature makes nothing without some end in view, nothing to no purpose, it must be that nature has made all of them for the sake of man.

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Aristotle

But obviously a state which becomes progressively more and more of a unity will cease to be a state at all. Plurality of numbers is natural in a state; and the farther it moves away from plurality towards...

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Aristotle

So we must lay it down that the association which is a state exists not for the purpose of living together but for the sake of noble actions. Those who contribute most to this kind of association are for...

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Aristotle

Justice therefore demands that no one should do more ruling than being ruled, but that all should have their turn.

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Aristotle

So it is clear that the search for what is just is a search for the mean; for the law is the mean.

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Aristotle

...the life which is best for men, both separately, as individuals, and in the mass, as states, is the life which has virtue sufficiently supported by material resources to facilitate participation in...

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Aristotle

A state is an association of similar persons whose aim is the best life possible. What is best is happiness, and to be happy is an active exercise of virtue and a complete employment of it.

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Aristotle

...happiness is an activity and a complete utilization of virtue, not conditionally but absolutely.

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Aristotle

But since there is but one aim for the entire state, it follows that education must be one and the same for all, and that the responsibility for it must be a public one, not the private affair which it...

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Aristotle

Only you can take you to Funkytown.

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Aristotle

Through discipline comes freedom.

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Aristotle

We are the sum of our actions, and therefore our habits make all the difference.

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Aristotle

He is courageous who endures and fears the right thing, for the right motive, in the right way and at the right times.

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Aristotle

The family is the association established by nature for the supply of man's everyday wants.

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Aristotle

Just as at the Olympic games it is not the handsomest or strongest men who are crowned with victory but the successful competitors, so in life it is those who act rightly who carry off all the prizes and...

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Aristotle

Justice is the loveliest and health is the best. but the sweetest to obtain is the heart's desire.

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Aristotle

The male has more teeth than the female in mankind, and sheep and goats, and swine. This has not been observed in other animals. Those persons which have the greatest number of teeth are the longest lived;...

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Aristotle

Where your talents and the needs of the world cross; there lies your vocation.

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Aristotle

No great mind has ever existed without a touch of madness.

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Aristotle

Adventure is worthwhile.

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Aristotle

Happiness does not consist in pastimes and amusements but in virtuous activities.

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Aristotle

Liars when they speak the truth are not believed.

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Aristotle

To die in order to avoid the pains of poverty, love, or anything that is disagreeable, is not the part of a brave man, but of a coward.

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Aristotle

Happiness itself is sufficient excuse. Beautiful things are right and true; so beautiful actions are those pleasing to the gods. Wise men have an inward sense of what is beautiful, and the highest wisdom...

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Aristotle

Happiness does not lie in amusement; it would be strange if one were to take trouble and suffer hardship all one's life in order to amuse oneself.

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Aristotle

All friendly feelings toward others come from the friendly feelings a person has for himself.

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Aristotle

Where perception is, there also are pain and pleasure, and where these are, there, of necessity, is desire.

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Aristotle

Since the things we do determine the character of life, no blessed person can become unhappy. For he will never do those things which are hateful and petty.

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Aristotle

Obstinate people can be divided into the opinionated, the ignorant, and the boorish.

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Aristotle

Ancient laws remain in force long after the people have the power to change them.

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Aristotle

Where some people are very wealthy and others have nothing, the result will be either extreme democracy or absolute oligarchy, or despotism will come from either of those excesses.

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Aristotle

People become house builders through building houses, harp players through playing the harp. We grow to be just by doing things which are just.

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Aristotle

Earthworms are the intenstines of the soil.

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Aristotle

To write well, express yourself like the common people, but think like a wise man.

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Aristotle

It is possible to fail in many ways . . . while to succeed is possible only in one way (for which reason also one is easy and the other difficult - to miss the mark easy, to hit it difficult).

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Aristotle

Happiness, then, is found to be something perfect and self-sufficient, being the end to which our actions are directed.

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Aristotle

... the good for man is an activity of the soul in accordance with virtue, or if there are more kinds of virtue than one, in accordance with the best and most perfect kind.

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Aristotle

So virtue is a purposive disposition, lying in a mean that is relative to us and determined by a rational principle, and by that which a prudent man would use to determine it. It is a mean between two...

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Aristotle

It [Justice] is complete virtue in the fullest sense, because it is the active exercise of complete virtue; and it is complete because its possessor can exercise it in relation to another person, and not...

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Aristotle

...virtue is not merely a state in conformity with the right principle, but one that implies the right principle; and the right principle in moral conduct is prudence.

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Aristotle

Between friends there is no need for justice, but people who are just still need the quality of friendship; and indeed friendliness is considered to be justice in the fullest sense.

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Aristotle

We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence. But they hesitate, waiting for the other fellow to make the first move-and he, in turn, waits for you.

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Aristotle

But a man's best friend is the one who not only wishes him well but wishes it for his own sake (even though nobody will ever know it): and this condition is best fulfilled by his attitude towards himself...

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Aristotle

... the friendship of worthless people has a bad effect (because they take part, unstable as they are, in worthless pursuits, and actually become bad through each other's influence). But the friendship...

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Aristotle

For contemplation is both the highest form of activity (since the intellect is the highest thing in us, and the objects that it apprehends are the highest things that can be known), and also it is the...

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Aristotle

Happiness, then, is co-extensive with contemplation, and the more people contemplate, the happier they are; not incidentally, but in virtue of their contemplation, because it is in itself precious. Thus...

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Aristotle

It makes no difference whether a good man has defrauded a bad man, or a bad man defrauded a good man, or whether a good or bad man has committed adultery: the law can look only to the amount of damage...

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Aristotle

Therefore, even the lover of myth is a philosopher; for myth is composed of wonder.

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Aristotle

At the intersection where your gifts, talents, and abilities meet a human need; therein you will discover your purpose

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Aristotle

The greatest of all pleasures is the pleasure of learning.

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Aristotle

Character gives us qualities, but it is in actions - what we do - that we are happy or the reverse. ... All human happiness and misery take the form of action.

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Aristotle

Tragedy is an imitation not only of a complete action, but of events inspiring fear and pity. Such an effect is best produced when the events come on us by surprise; and the effect is heightened when,...

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Aristotle

With the truth, all given facts harmonize; but with what is false, the truth soon hits a wrong note.

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Aristotle

Greed has no boundaries

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Aristotle

That which is common to the greatest number has the least care bestowed upon it

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Aristotle

Thus every action must be due to one or other of seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reasoning, anger, or appetite.

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Aristotle

Men in general desire the good and not merely what their fathers had.

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Aristotle

Nature creates nothing without a purpose.

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Aristotle

Before you heal the body you must first heal the mind

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Aristotle

Being a father is the most rewarding thing a man whose career has plateaued can do.

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Aristotle

Of the tyrant, spies and informers are the principal instruments. War is his favorite occupation, for the sake of engrossing the attention of the people, and making himself necessary to them as their leader.

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Aristotle

When their adventures do not succeed, however, they run away; but it was the mark of a brave man to face things that are, and seem, terrible for a man, because it is noble to do so and disgraceful not...

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Aristotle

Evil brings men together.

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Aristotle

Whatsoever that be within us that feels, thinks, desires, and animates, is something celestial, divine, and, consequently, imperishable.

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Aristotle

Have a definite, clear, practical ideal - a goal, an objective.

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Aristotle

Beauty is the gift of God

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Aristotle

Those that deem politics beneath their dignity are doomed to be governed by those of lesser talents.

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Aristotle

The Life of the intellect is the best and pleasantest for man, because the intellect more than anything else is the man. Thus it will be the happiest life as well.

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Aristotle

When...we, as individuals, obey laws that direct us to behave for the welfare of the community as a whole, we are indirectly helping to promote the pursuit of happiness by our fellow human beings.

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Aristotle

Nature of man is not what he was born as, but what he is born for.

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Aristotle

A vivid image compels the whole body to follow.

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Aristotle

A friend is a second self, so that our consciousness of a friend's existence...makes us more fully conscious of our own existence.

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Aristotle

All Earthquakes and Disasters are warnings; there’s too much corruption in the world

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Aristotle

Art not only imitates nature, but also completes its deficiencies.

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Aristotle

A good style must, first of all, be clear. It must not be mean or above the dignity of the subject. It must be appropriate.

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Aristotle

The soul is characterized by these capacities; self-nutrition, sensation, thinking, and movement.

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Aristotle

A true disciple shows his appreciation by reaching further than his teacher.

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Aristotle

This body is not a home, but an inn; and that only for a short time. Seneca Friendship is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.

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Aristotle

It is the characteristic of the magnanimous man to ask no favor but to be ready to do kindness to others.

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Aristotle

The greatest thing by far is to have a command of metaphor. This alone cannot be imparted by another; it is the mark of genius, for to make good metaphors implies an eye for resemblances.

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Aristotle

In general, what is written must be easy to read and easy to speak; which is the same.

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Aristotle

Yellow-colored objects appear to be gold

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Aristotle

It is this simplicity that makes the uneducated more effective than the educated when addressing popular audiences-makes them, as the poets tell us, 'charm the crowd's ears more finely.' Educated men lay...

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Aristotle

Virtue means doing the right thing, in relation to the right person, at the right time, to the right extent, in the right manner, and for the right purpose. Thus, to give money away is quite a simple task,...

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Aristotle

"I was not alone when I was in Goofy hell"

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Aristotle

Plato is my friend, but truth is a better friend.

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Aristotle

By myth I mean the arrangement of the incidents

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Aristotle

Youth loves honor and victory more than money.

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Aristotle

They should rule who are able to rule best.

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Aristotle

A state is not a mere society, having a common place, established for the prevention of mutual crime and for the sake of exchange. . . .Political society exists for the sake of noble actions, and not mere...

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Aristotle

Character is that which reveals moral purpose, exposing the class of things a man chooses and avoids.

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Aristotle

When you are lonely, when you feel yourself an alien in the world, play Chess. This will raise your spirits and be your counselor in war

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Aristotle

The basis of a democratic state is liberty

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Aristotle

Nature makes nothing incomplete, and nothing in vain.

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Aristotle

There is more both of beauty and of raison d'etre in the works of nature- than in those of art.

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Aristotle

Those whose days are consumed in the low pursuits of avarice, or the gaudy frivolties of fashion, unobservant of nature's lovelinessof demarcation, nor on which side thereof an intermediate form should...

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Aristotle

Man's best friend is one who wishes well to the object of his wish for his sake, even if no one is to know of it.

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Aristotle

Between friends there is no need of justice.

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Aristotle

PLOT is CHARACTER revealed by ACTION.

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Aristotle

To enjoy the things we ought and to hate the things we ought has the greatest bearing on excellence of character.

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Aristotle

One who faces and who fears the right things and from the right motive, in the right way and at the right time, posseses character worthy of our trust and admiration.

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Aristotle

Our characters are the result of our conduct.

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Aristotle

In the arena of human life the honors and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities in action.

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Aristotle

Man is a goal-seeking animal. His life only has meaning if he is reaching out and striving for his goals.

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Aristotle

Happiness is an activity of the soul in accordance with virtue

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Aristotle

Pay attention to the young, and make them just as good as possible.

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Aristotle

Man is by nature a social animal; an individual who is unsocial naturally and not accidentally is either beneath our notice or more than human. Society is something that precedes the individual. Anyone...

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Aristotle

They - Young People have exalted notions, because they have not been humbled by life or learned its necessary limitations; moreover, their hopeful disposition makes them think themselves equal to great...

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Aristotle

When people are friends, they have no need of justice, but when they are just, they need friendship in addition.

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Aristotle

Marriage is like retiring as a bachelor and getting a sexual pension. You don't have to work for the sex any more, but you only get 65% as much.

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Aristotle

It is clear that there is some difference between ends: some ends are energeia [energy], while others are products which are additional to the energeia.

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Aristotle

One swallow does not make a spring, nor does one fine day.

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Aristotle

It may be argued that peoples for whom philosophers legislate are always prosperous.

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Aristotle

Happiness is a quality of the soul...not a function of one's material circumstances.

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Aristotle

The man who is content to live alone is either a beast or a god.

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Aristotle

What is common to many is least taken care of, for all men have greater regard for what is their own than what they possess in common with others.

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Aristotle

Philosophy begins with wonder.

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Aristotle

Good moral character is not something that we can achieve on our own. We need a culture that supports the conditions under which self-love and friendship flourish.

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Aristotle

The intention makes the crime.

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Aristotle

A friend of everyone is a friend of no one

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Aristotle

The soul suffers when the body is diseased or traumatized, while the body suffers when the soul is ailing.

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Aristotle

People of superior refinement and of active disposition identify happiness with honour; for this is roughly speaking, the end of political life.

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Aristotle

Conscientious and careful physicians allocate causes of disease to natural laws, while the ablest scientists go back to medicine for their first principles.

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Aristotle

Cruel is the strife of brothers.

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Aristotle

Every realm of nature is marvelous.

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Aristotle

Why is it that all men who are outstanding in philosophy, poetry or the arts are melancholic?

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Aristotle

The true nature of anything is what it becomes at its highest.

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Aristotle

It is absurd to hold that a man should be ashamed of an inability to defend himself with his limbs, but not ashamed of an inability to defend himself with speech and reason; for the use of rational speech...

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Aristotle

If every tool, when ordered, or even of its own accord, could do the work that befits it... then there would be no need either of apprentices for the master workers or of slaves for the lords.

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Aristotle

Virtue is the golden mean between two vices, the one of excess and the other of deficiency.

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Aristotle

Whether we call it sacrifice, or poetry, or adventure, it is always the same voice that calls.

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Aristotle

Money is a guarantee that we can have what we want in the future

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Aristotle

Virtue makes us aim at the right end, and practical wisdom makes us take the right means.

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Aristotle

The weak are always anxious for justice and equality. The strong pay no heed to either.

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Aristotle

In a polity, each citizen is to possess his own arms, which are not supplied or owned by the state.

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Aristotle

We are what we frequently do.

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Aristotle

The unfortunate need people who will be kind to them; the prosperous need people to be kind to.

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Aristotle

Those who cannot bravely face danger are the slaves of their attackers.

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Aristotle

No one will dare maintain that it is better to do injustice than to bear it.

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Aristotle

The happy life is thought to be one of excellence; now an excellent life requires exertion, and does not consist in amusement.

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Aristotle

Beauty depends on size as well as symmetry. No very small animal can be beautiful, for looking at it takes so small a portion of time that the impression of it will be confused. Nor can any very large...

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Aristotle

They who are to be judges must also be performers.

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Aristotle

It is easy to perform a good action, but not easy to acquire a settled habit of performing such actions.

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Aristotle

Teaching is the highest form of understanding.

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Aristotle

To be conscious that we are perceiving or thinking is to be conscious of our own existence.

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Aristotle

Music directly imitates the passions or states of the soul...when one listens to music that imitates a certain passion, he becomes imbued withthe same passion; and if over a long time he habitually listens...

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Aristotle

And so long as they were at war, their power was preserved, but when they had attained empire they fell, for of the arts of peace they knew nothing, and had never engaged in any employment higher than...

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Aristotle

Doubt is the beginning of wisdom

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Aristotle

Happiness seems to require a modicum of external prosperity.

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Aristotle

In revolutions the occasions may be trifling but great interest are at stake.

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Aristotle

It is possible to fail in many ways...while to succeed is possible only in one way.

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Aristotle

The so-called Pythagoreans, who were the first to take up mathematics, not only advanced this subject, but saturated with it, they fancied that the principles of mathematics were the principles of all...

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Aristotle

Now that practical skills have developed enough to provide adequately for material needs, one of these sciences which are not devoted to utilitarian ends [mathematics] has been able to arise in Egypt,...

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Aristotle

A good character carries with it the highest power of causing a thing to be believed.

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Aristotle

Human beings are curious by nature.

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Aristotle

The purpose of the present study is not as it is in other inquiries, the attainment of knowledge, we are not conducting this inquiry in order to know what virtue is, but in order to become good, else there...

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Aristotle

Every science and every inquiry, and similarly every activity and pursuit, is thought to aim at some good.

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Aristotle

The more you know, the more you know you don't know.

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Aristotle

We deliberate not about ends, but about means.

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Aristotle

Music has a power of forming the character, and should therefore be introduced into the education of the young.

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Aristotle

So it is naturally with the male and the female; the one is superior, the other inferior; the one governs, the other is governed; and the same rule must necessarily hold good with respect to all mankind.

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Aristotle

It is well to be up before daybreak, for such habits contribute to health, wealth, and wisdom.

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Aristotle

The excellence of a thing is related to its proper function.

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Aristotle

In everything, it is no easy task to find the middle.

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Aristotle

We must become just be doing just acts.

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Aristotle

It is no easy task to be good.

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Aristotle

If there is some end of the things we do, which we desire for its own sake, clearly this must be the good. Will not knowledge of it, then, have a great influence on life? Shall we not, like archers who...

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Aristotle

Life in the true sense is perceiving or thinking.

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Aristotle

If purpose, then, is inherent in art, so is it in Nature also. The best illustration is the case of a man being his own physician, for Nature is like that - agent and patient at once.

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Aristotle

It is our choice of good or evil that determines our character, not our opinion about good or evil.

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Aristotle

Happiness is a sort of action.

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Aristotle

Anaximenes and Anaxagoras and Democritus say that its [the earth's] flatness is responsible for it staying still: for it does not cut the air beneath but covers it like a lid, which flat bodies evidently...

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Aristotle

But the whole vital process of the earth takes place so gradually and in periods of time which are so immense compared with the length of our life, that these changes are not observed, and before their...

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Aristotle

It is clear that the earth does not move, and that it does not lie elsewhere than at the center.

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Aristotle

If there is any kind of animal which is female and has no male separate from it, it is possible that this may generate a young one from itself. No instance of this worthy of any credit has been observed...

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Aristotle

Plants, again, inasmuch as they are without locomotion, present no great variety in their heterogeneous pacts. For, when the functions are but few, few also are the organs required to effect them. ......

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Aristotle

Friends are an aid to the young, to guard them from error; to the elderly, to attend to their wants and to supplement their failing power of action; to those in the prime of life, to assist them to noble...

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Aristotle

The angry man wishes the object of his anger to suffer in return; hatred wishes its object not to exist.

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Aristotle

Nor was civil society founded merely to preserve the lives of its members; but that they might live well: for otherwise a state might be composed of slaves, or the animal creation... nor is it an alliance...

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Aristotle

A tragedy is the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself . . . with incidents arousing pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions.

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Aristotle

The vigorous are no better than the lazy during one half of life, for all men are alike when asleep.

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Aristotle

Each human being is bred with a unique set of potentials that yearn to be fulfilled as surely as the acorn yearns to become the oak within it.

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Aristotle

Love is the cause of unity in all things.

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Aristotle

Happiness, whether consisting in pleasure or virtue, or both, is more often found with those who are highly cultivated in their minds and in their character, and have only a moderate share of external...

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Aristotle

Why is it that all those who have become eminent in philosophy, politics, poetry, or the arts are clearly of an atrabilious temperament and some of them to such an extent as to be affected by diseases...

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Aristotle

Shipping magnate of the 20th century If women didn't exist, all the money in the world would have no meaning.

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Aristotle

It is a part of probability that many improbable things will happen.

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Aristotle

Life cannot be lived, and understood, simultaneously.

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Aristotle

It is likely that unlikely things should happen

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Aristotle

We become just by the practice of just actions, self-controlled by exercising self-control, and courageous by performing acts of courage.

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Aristotle

Quid quid movetur ab alio movetur"(nothing moves without having been moved).

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Aristotle

The society that loses its grip on the past is in danger, for it produces men who know nothing but the present, and who are not aware that life had been, and could be, different from what it is.

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Aristotle

For the real difference between humans and other animals is that humans alone have perception of good and evil, just and unjust, etc. It is the sharing of a common view in these matters that makes a household...

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Aristotle

To leave the number of births unrestricted, as is done in most states, inevitably causes poverty among the citizens, and poverty produces crime and faction.

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Aristotle

Phronimos, possessing practical wisdom . But the only virtue special to a ruler is practical wisdom; all the others must be possessed, so it seems, both by rulers and ruled. The virtue of a person being...

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Aristotle

It is clear that those constitutions which aim at the common good are right, as being in accord with absolute justice; while those which aim only at the good of the rulers are wrong.

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Aristotle

A man who examines each subject from a philosophical standpoint cannot neglect them: he has to omit nothing, and state the truth about each topic.

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Aristotle

Thus it is thought that justice is equality; and so it is, but not for all persons, only for those that are equal. Inequality also is thought to be just; and so it is, but not for all, only for the unequal....

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Aristotle

So we must lay it down that the association which is a state exists not for the purpose of living together but for the sake of noble actions.

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Aristotle

But it is not at all certain that this superiority of the many over the sound few is possible in the case of every people and every large number. There are some whom it would be impossible: otherwise the...

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Aristotle

To let them share in the highest offices is to take a risk; inevitably, their unjust standards will cause them to commit injustice, and their lack of judgement will lead them into error. On the other hand...

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Aristotle

Perhaps here we have a clue to the reason why royal rule used to exist formerly, namely the difficulty of finding enough men of outstanding virtue ..

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Aristotle

. .we would have to say that hereditary succession is harmful. You may say the king, having sovereign power, will not in that case hand over to his children. But it is hard to believe that: it is a difficult...

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Aristotle

.. for desire is like a wild beast, and anger perverts rulers and the very best of men. Hence law is intelligence without appetition.

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Aristotle

The right constitutions, three in number- kingship, aristocracy, and polity- and the deviations from these, likewise three in number - tyranny from kingship, oligarchy from aristocracy, democracy from...

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Aristotle

A democracy exists whenever those who are free and are not well-off, being in the majority, are in sovereign control of government, an oligarchy when control lies with the rich and better-born, these being...

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Aristotle

Whatever we learn to do, we learn by actually doing it; men come to be builders, for instance, by building, and harp players by playing the harp. In the same way, by doing just acts we come to be just;...

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Aristotle

For this reason poetry is something more philosophical and more worthy of serious attention than history.

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Aristotle

The young are heated by Nature as drunken men by wine.

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Aristotle

The heart is the perfection of the whole organism. Therefore the principles of the power of perception and the souls ability to nourish itself must lie in the heart.

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Aristotle

We ought not to listen to those who exhort us, because we are human, to think of human things....We ought rather to take on immortality as much as possible, and do all that we can to live in accordance...

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Aristotle

Not to know of what things one should demand demonstration, and of what one should not, argues want of education.

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Aristotle

All men agree that a just distribution must be according to merit in some sense; they do not all specify the same sort of merit, but democrats identify it with freemen, supporters of oligarchy with wealth...

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Aristotle

The law does not expressly permit suicide, and what it does not permit it forbids.

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Aristotle

Wicked me obey from fear; good men,from love.

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Aristotle

Metaphysics is universal and is exclusively concerned with primary substance. ... And here we will have the science to study that which is, both in its essence and in the properties which it has.

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Aristotle

The hardest victory is the victory over self.

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Aristotle

For what is the best choice for each individual is the highest it is possible for him to achieve.

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Aristotle

Music directly represents the passions of the soul. If one listens to the wrong kind of music, he will become the wrong kind of person.

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Aristotle

A goal gets us motivated,while a good habit keeps us stay motivated.

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Aristotle

Perception starts with the eye.

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Aristotle

The greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor.

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Aristotle

When the storytelling goes bad in a society, the result is decadence.

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Aristotle

Courage is the mother of all virtues because without it, you cannot consistently perform the others.

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Aristotle

A common danger unites even the bitterest enemies.

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Aristotle

We must not listen to those who advise us 'being men to think human thoughts, and being mortal to think mortal thoughts' but must put on immortality as much as possible and strain every nerve to live according...

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Aristotle

A person's life persuades better than his word.

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Aristotle

Today, see if you can stretch your heart and expand your love so that it touches not only those to whom you can give it easily, but also to those who need it so much.

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Aristotle

Even that some people try deceived me many times ... I will not fail to believe that somewhere, someone deserves my trust.

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Aristotle

Man perfected by society is the best of all animals; he is the most terrible of all when he lives without law, and without justice.

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Aristotle

They who have drunk beer, fall on their back, but there is a peculiarity in the effects of the drink made from barley, for they that get drunk on other intoxicating liquors fall on all parts of their body,...

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Aristotle

In poverty and other misfortunes of life, true friends are a sure refuge.

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Aristotle

The greatest threat to the state is not faction but distraction

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Aristotle

Tyrants preserve themselves by sowing fear and mistrust among the citizens by means of spies, by distracting them with foreign wars, by eliminating men of spirit who might lead a revolution, by humbling...

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Aristotle

What is the essence of life? To serve others and to do good.

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Aristotle

The happy life is regarded as a life in conformity with virtue. It is a life which involves effort and is not spent in amusement.

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Aristotle

Nature does nothing in vain. Therefore, it is imperative for persons to act in accordance with their nature and develop their latent talents, in order to be content and complete.

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Aristotle

If something's bound to happen, it will happen.. Right time, right person, and for the best reason.

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Aristotle

Happiness is prosperity combined with virtue.

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Aristotle

The proof that you know something is that you are able to teach it

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Aristotle

For often, when one is asleep, there is something in consciousness which declares that what then presents itself is but a dream.

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Aristotle

Laughter is a bodily exercise, precious to Health

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Aristotle

Anything whose presence or absence makes no discernible difference is no essential part of the whole.

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Aristotle

We ought, so far as it lies within our power, to aspire to immortality, and do all that we can to live in conformity with the highest that is within us; for even if it is small in quantity, in power and...

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Aristotle

The seat of the soul and the control of voluntary movement - in fact, of nervous functions in general, - are to be sought in the heart. The brain is an organ of minor importance.

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Aristotle

You should never think without an image.

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Aristotle

The sun, moving as it does, sets up processes of change and becoming and decay, and by its agency the finest and sweetest water is every day carried up and is dissolved into vapour and rises to the upper...

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Aristotle

It is the mark of an educated mind to expect that amount of exactness which the nature of the particular subject admits. It is equally unreasonable to accept merely probable conclusions from a mathematician...

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Aristotle

All art is concerned with coming into being; for it is concerned neither with things that are, or come into being by necessity, nor with things that do so in accordance with nature.

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Aristotle

The beautiful is that which is desirable in itself.

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Aristotle

A likely impossibility is always preferable to an unconvincing possibility.

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Aristotle

To be ignorant of motion is to be ignorant of nature

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Aristotle

The most important relationship we can all have is the one you have with yourself, the most important journey you can take is one of self-discovery. To know yourself, you must spend time with yourself,...

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Aristotle

When quarrels and complaints arise, it is when people who are equal have not got equal shares, or vice-versa.

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Aristotle

He who is by nature not his own but another's man is by nature a slave.

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Aristotle

To learn is a natural pleasure, not confined to philosophers, but common to all men.

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Aristotle

The greatest thing by far is to be a master of metaphor; it is the one thing that cannot be learned from others; and it is also a sign of genius, since a good metaphor implies an intuitive perception of...

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Aristotle

That judges of important causes should hold office for life is a questionable thing, for the mind grows old as well as the body.

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Aristotle

Whereas the law is passionless, passion must ever sway the heart of man.

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Aristotle

Men cling to life even at the cost of enduring great misfortune.

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Aristotle

The quality of life is determined by its activities.

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Aristotle

Temperance and bravery, then, are ruined by excess and deficiency, but preserved by the mean.

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Aristotle

Not to get what you have set your heart on is almost as bad as getting nothing at all.

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Aristotle

Why do men seek honour? Surely in order to confirm the favorable opinion they have formed of themselves.

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Aristotle

Revolutions are not about trifles, but spring from trifles.

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Aristotle

Where the laws are not supreme, there demagogues spring up.

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Aristotle

Some vices miss what is right because they are deficient, others because they are excessive, in feelings or in actions, while virtue finds and chooses the mean.

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Aristotle

Happiness belongs to the self sufficient.

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Aristotle

That which is impossible and probable is better than that which is possible and improbable.

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Aristotle

Young people are in a condition like permanent intoxication, because life is sweet and they are growing.

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Aristotle

A speaker who is attempting to move people to thought or action must concern himself with Pathos.

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Aristotle

Knowing what is right does not make a sagacious man.

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Aristotle

Those who believe that all virtue is to be found in their own party principles push matters to extremes; they do not consider that disproportion destroys a state.

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Aristotle

To perceive is to suffer.

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Aristotle

When we deliberate it is about means and not ends.

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Aristotle

We must be neither cowardly nor rash but courageous.

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Aristotle

Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom.

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Aristotle

Happiness is the settling of the soul into its most appropriate spot.

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Aristotle

The appropriate age for marrige is around eighteen and thirty-seven for man

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Aristotle

It is more difficult to organize a peace than to win a war; but the fruits of victory will be lost if the peace is not organized.

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Aristotle

With respect to the requirement of art, the probable impossible is always preferable to the improbable possible.

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Aristotle

The investigation of the truth is in one way hard, in another easy. An indication of this is found in the fact that no one is able to attain the truth adequately, while, on the other hand, no one fails...

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Aristotle

The blood of a goat will shatter a diamond.

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Aristotle

The pleasures arising from thinking and learning will make us think and learn all the more. 1153a 23

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Aristotle

The Eyes are the organs of temptation, and the Ears are the organs of instruction.

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Aristotle

The antidote for fifty enemies is one friend.

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Aristotle

Worms are the intestines of the earth.

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Aristotle

Everybody loves a thing more if it has cost him trouble: for instance those who have made money love money more than those who have inherited it.

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Aristotle

Greatness of spirit is to bear finely both good fourtune and bad, honor and disgrace, and not to think highly of luxury or attention or power or victories in contests, and to possess a certain depth and...

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Aristotle

It belongs to small-mindedness to be unable to bear either honor or dishonor, either good fortune or bad, but to be filled with conceit when honored and puffed up by trifling good fortune, and to be unable...

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Aristotle

Anything that we have to learn to do we learn by the actual doing of it; People become builders by building and instrumentalists by playing instruments. Similarily, we become just by performing just acts,...

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Aristotle

Our youth should also be educated with music and physical education.

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Aristotle

If men are given food, but no chastisement nor any work, they become insolent.

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Aristotle

The same ideas, one must believe, recur in men's minds not once or twice but again and again.

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Aristotle

Memory is therefore, neither Perception nor Conception, but a state or affection of one of these, conditioned by lapse of time. As already observed, there is no such thing as memory of the present while...

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Aristotle

All men seek one goal: success or happiness.

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Aristotle

If happiness is activity in accordance with excellence, it is reasonable that it should be in accordance with the highest excellence.

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Aristotle

The only way to achieve true success is to express yourself completely in service to society.

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Aristotle

A friend is a second self.

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Aristotle

He who has overcome his fears will truly be free.

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Aristotle

Happiness is the reward of virtue.

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Aristotle

A gentleman is not disturbed by anything

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Aristotle

Happiness is activity.

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Aristotle

Friendship is a thing most necessary to life, since without friends no one would choose to live, though possessed of all other advantages.

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Aristotle

Some men are just as sure of the truth of their opinions as are others of what they know.

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Aristotle

For as the interposition of a rivulet, however small, will occasion the line of the phalanx to fluctuate, so any trifling disagreement will be the cause of seditions; but they will not so soon flow from...

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Aristotle

Freedom is obedience to self-formulated rules.

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Aristotle

It is no part of a physician's business to use either persuasion or compulsion upon the patients.

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Aristotle

The physician himself, if sick, actually calls in another physician, knowing that he cannot reason correctly if required to judge his own condition while suffering.

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Aristotle

All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of youth.

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Aristotle

We are what we reblog.

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Aristotle

Why do they call it proctology? Is it because analogy was already taken?

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Aristotle

We are what we continually do...

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Aristotle

Happiness is a state of activity.

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Aristotle

When a draco has eaten much fruit, it seeks the juice of the bitter lettuce; it has been seen to do this.

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Aristotle

[I]t is rather the case that we desire something because we believe it to be good than that we believe a thing to be good because we desire it. It is the thought that starts things off.

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Aristotle

It is the mark of an educated mind to rest satisfied with the degree of precision which the nature of the subject admits and not to seek exactness where only an approximation is possible.

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Aristotle

Excellence is an art won by training and habituation.

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Aristotle

Distance does not break off the friendship absolutely, but only the activity of it.

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Aristotle

Since music has so much to do with the molding of character, it is necessary that we teach it to our children.

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Aristotle

If you prove the cause, you at once prove the effect; and conversely nothing can exist without its cause.

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Aristotle

Time is the measurable unit of movement concerning a before and an after.

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Aristotle

Neither by nature, then, nor contrary to nature do the virtues arise in us; rather we are adapted by nature to receive them, and are made perfect by habit.

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Aristotle

Melancholy men, of all others, are the most witty.

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Aristotle

Truth is a remarkable thing. We cannot miss knowing some of it. But we cannot know it entirely.

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Aristotle

These virtues are formed in man by his doing the actions ... The good of man is a working of the soul in the way of excellence in a complete life.

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Aristotle

Yes the truth is that men's ambition and their desire to make money are among the most frequent causes of deliberate acts of injustice.

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Aristotle

It is also in the interests of the tyrant to make his subjects poor... the people are so occupied with their daily tasks that they have no time for plotting.

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Aristotle

The self-indulgent man craves for all pleasant things... and is led by his appetite to choose these at the cost of everything else.

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Aristotle

Wicked men obey for fear, but the good for love.

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Aristotle

Bad people...are in conflict with themselves; they desire one thing and will another, like the incontinent who choose harmful pleasures instead of what they themselves believe to be good.

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Aristotle

Patience is so like fortitude that she seems either her sister or her daughter.

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Aristotle

It is their character indeed that makes people who they are. But it is by reason of their actions that they are happy or the reverse.

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Aristotle

Happiness depends on ourselves.

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Aristotle

He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god.

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Aristotle

All that one gains by falsehood is, not to be believed when he speaks the truth.

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Aristotle

For even they who compose treatises of medicine or natural philosophy in verse are denominated Poets: yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common except their metre; the former, therefore, justly merits...

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Aristotle

It is evidently equally foolish to accept probable reasoning from a mathematician and to demand from a rhetorician demonstrative proofs.

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Aristotle

Give a man a fish, you feed him for a day. Give a man a poisoned fish, you feed him for the rest of his life.

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Aristotle

And yet the true creator is necessity, which is the mother of invention.

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Aristotle

You'll understand what life is if you think about the act of dying. When I die, how will I be different from the way I am right now? In the first moments after death, my body will be scarcely different...

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Aristotle

It is in justice that the ordering of society is centered.

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Aristotle

This much then, is clear: in all our conduct it is the mean that is to be commended.

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Aristotle

Learning is not child's play; we cannot learn without pain.

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Aristotle

Evils draw men together.

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Aristotle

It concerns us to know the purposes we seek in life, for then, like archers aiming at a definite mark, we shall be more likely to attain what we want.

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Aristotle

The actuality of thought is life.

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Aristotle

While most of those who hold that the whole heaven is finite say that the earth lies at the center, the philosophers of Italy, the so-called Pythagoreans, assert the contrary. They say that in the middle...

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Aristotle

For both excessive and insufficient exercise destroy one's strength, and both eating and drinking too much or too little destroy health, whereas the right quantity produces, increases and preserves it....

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Aristotle

Suppose, then, that all men were sick or deranged, save one or two of them who were healthy and of right mind. It would then be the latter two who would be thought to be sick and deranged and the former...

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Aristotle

It is clear, then, that wisdom is knowledge having to do with certain principles and causes. But now, since it is this knowledge that we are seeking, we must consider the following point: of what kind...

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Aristotle

...The entire preoccupation of the physicist is with things that contain within themselves a principle of movement and rest.

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Aristotle

... There must then be a principle of such a kind that its substance is activity.

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Aristotle

Demonstration is also something necessary, because a demonstration cannot go otherwise than it does, ... And the cause of this lies with the primary premises/principles.

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Aristotle

... a science must deal with a subject and its properties.

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Aristotle

At first he who invented any art that went beyond the common perceptions of man was naturally admired by men, not only because there was something useful in the inventions, but because he was thought wise...

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Aristotle

... the science we are after is not about mathematicals either none of them, you see, is separable.

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Aristotle

But also philosophy is not about perceptible substances they, you see, are prone to destruction.

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Aristotle

Metaphysics involves intuitive knowledge of unprovable starting-points concepts and truth and demonstrative knowledge of what follows from them.

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Aristotle

The life of theoretical philosophy is the best and happiest a man can lead. Few men are capable of it and then only intermittently. For the rest there is a second-best way of life, that of moral virtue...

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Aristotle

The body is at its best between the ages of thirty and thirty-five.

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Aristotle

Great men are always of a nature originally melancholy.

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Aristotle

Comedy aims at representing men as worse, Tragedy as better than in actual life.

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Aristotle

Philosophy is the science which considers truth.

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Aristotle

Virtue is more clearly shown in the performance of fine ACTIONS than in the non-performance of base ones.

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Aristotle

The energy or active exercise of the mind constitutes life.

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Aristotle

Wonder implies the desire to learn.

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Aristotle

The shape of the heaven is of necessity spherical; for that is the shape most appropriate to its substance and also by nature primary.

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Aristotle

Philosophy can make people sick.

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Aristotle

The body is most fully developed from thirty to thirty-five years of age, the mind at about forty-nine.

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Aristotle

We do not know a truth without knowing its cause.

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Aristotle

We should behave to our friends as we would wish our friends behave to us

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Aristotle

Salt water when it turns into vapour becomes sweet, and the vapour does not form salt water when it condenses again. This I know by experiment. The same thing is true in every case of the kind: wine and...

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Aristotle

There is more evidence to prove that saltness [of the sea] is due to the admixture of some substance, besides that which we have adduced. Make a vessel of wax and put it in the sea, fastening its mouth...

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Aristotle

The physician heals, Nature makes well.

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Aristotle

But nature flies from the infinite; for the infinite is imperfect, and nature always seeks an end.

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Aristotle

To say of what is that it is not, or of what is not that it is, is false, while to say of what is that it is, and of what is not that it is not, is true.

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Aristotle

Everything that depends on the action of nature is by nature as good as it can be.

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Aristotle

For nature by the same cause, provided it remain in the same condition, always produces the same effect, so that either coming-to-be or passing-away will always result.

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Aristotle

Nature does nothing without a purpose. In children may be observed the traces and seeds of what will one day be settled psychological habits, though psychologically a child hardly differs for the time...

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Aristotle

Experience has shown that it is difficult, if not impossible, for a populous state to be run by good laws.

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Aristotle

To the sober person adventurous conduct often seems insanity.

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Aristotle

Such an event is probable in Agathon's sense of the word: 'it is probable,' he says, 'that many things should happen contrary to probability.'

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Aristotle

If the consequences are the same it is always better to assume the more limited antecedent, since in things of nature the limited, as being better, is sure to be found, wherever possible, rather than the...

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Aristotle

To Thales the primary question was not what do we know, but how do we know it.

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Aristotle

He who sees things grow from the beginning will have the best view of them.

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Aristotle

Now, the causes being four, it is the business of the student of nature to know about them all, and if he refers his problems back to all of them, he will assign the "why" in the way proper to his science-the...

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Aristotle

...we are all inclined to ... direct our inquiry not by the matter itself, but by the views of our opponents; and, even when interrogating oneself, one pushes the inquiry only to the point at which one...

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Aristotle

What we have to learn to do, we learn by doing.

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Aristotle

The final cause, then, produces motion through being loved.

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Aristotle

To the size of the state there is a limit, as there is to plants, animals and implements, for none of these retain their facility when they are too large.

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Aristotle

Art takes nature as its model.

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Aristotle

Men create the gods after their own images.

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Aristotle

The two qualities which chiefly inspire regard and affection are that a thing is your own and that it is your only one.

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Aristotle

A courageous person is one who faces fearful things as he ought and as reason directs for the sake of what is noble.

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Aristotle

The true nature of a thing is the highest it can become.

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Aristotle

Poverty is the parent of revolution and crime.

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Aristotle

We give up leisure in order that we may have leisure, just as we go to war in order that we may have peace.

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Aristotle

The legislator should direct his attention above all to the education of youth; for the neglect of education does harm to the constitution. The citizen should be molded to suit the form of government under...

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Aristotle

There is an ideal of excellence for any particular craft or occupation; similarly there must be an excellent that we can achieve as human beings. That is, we can live our lives as a whole in such a way...

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Aristotle

Whereas young people become accomplished in geometry and mathematics, and wise within these limits, prudent young people do not seem to be found. The reason is that prudence is concerned with particulars...

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Aristotle

There is only one condition in which we can imagine managers not needing subordinates, and masters not needing slaves. This condition would be that each (inanimate) instrument could do its own work.

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Aristotle

A democracy is a government in the hands of men of low birth, no property, and vulgar employments.

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Aristotle

You can never learn anything that you did not already know

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Aristotle

Dissimilarity of habit tends more than anything to destroy affection.

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Aristotle

Art completes what nature cannot bring to finish. The artist gives us knowledge of nature's unrealized ends.

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Aristotle

In painting, the most brilliant colors, spread at random and without design, will give far less pleasure than the simplest outline of a figure.

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Aristotle

The line between lawful and unlawful abortion will be marked by the fact of having sensation and being alive.

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Aristotle

Choice not chance determines your destiny [my family motto...credited to Aristotle]

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Aristotle

Of mankind in general, the parts are greater than the whole.

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“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss