Charles Dickens

Born: February 7, 1812

Die: June 9, 1870

Occupation: Writer

Quotes of Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens

If I could not walk far and fast, I think I should just explode and perish.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is required of every man," the ghost returned, "that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide; and, if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The sun himself is weak when he first rises, and gathers strength and courage as the day gets on.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A word in earnest is as good as a speech.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A dream, all a dream, that ends in nothing, and leaves the sleeper where he lay down, but I wish you to know that you inspired it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Above all, one hideous figure grew as familiar as if it had been before the general gaze from the foundations of the world - the figure of the sharp female called La Guillotine. It was the popular theme...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Before I go," he said, and paused -- "I may kiss her?" It was remembered afterwards that when he bent down and touched her face with his lips, he murmured some words. The child, who was nearest to him,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Skewered through and through with office-pens, and bound hand and foot with red tape.

Read more


Charles Dickens

That, they never could lay their heads upon their pillows; that, they could never tolerate the idea of their wives laying their heads upon their pillows; that, they could never endure the notion of their...

Read more


Charles Dickens

When they took a young man into Tellson's London house, they hid him somewhere till he was old. They kept him in a dark place, like a cheese, until he had the full Tellson flavour and blue-mould upon him....

Read more


Charles Dickens

And a beautiful world we live in, when it is possible, and when many other such things are possible, and not only possible, but done-- done, see you!-- under that sky there, every day.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There is a drowsy state, between sleeping and waking, when you dream more in five minutes with your eyes half open, and yourself half conscious of everything that is passing around you, than you would...

Read more


Charles Dickens

We need be careful how we deal with those about us, when every death carries to some small circle of survivors, thoughts of so much omitted, and so little done- of so many things forgotten, and so many...

Read more


Charles Dickens

You are hard at work madam ," said the man near her. Yes," Answered Madam Defarge ; " I have a good deal to do." What do you make, Madam ?" Many things." For instance ---" For instance," returned Madam...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Mr Lorry asks the witness questions: Ever been kicked? Might have been. Frequently? No. Ever kicked down stairs? Decidedly not; once received a kick at the top of a staircase, and fell down stairs of his...

Read more


Charles Dickens

What greater gift than the love of a cat.

Read more


Charles Dickens

So new to him," she muttered, "so old to me; so strange to him, so familiar to me; so melancholy to both of us!...

Read more


Charles Dickens

-Why don't you cry again, you little wretch? -Because I'll never cry for you again.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pound ought and six, result misery.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Some people are nobody's enemies but their own

Read more


Charles Dickens

Christmas was close at hand, in all his bluff and hearty honesty; it was the season of hospitality, merriment, and open-heartedness; the old year was preparing, like an ancient philosopher, to call his...

Read more


Charles Dickens

You have been the last dream of my soul.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and a skeleton truth that we never did. To the best of my belief, our case was in the last respect a rather common one.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Family not only need to consist of merely those whom we share blood, but also for those whom we'd give blood.

Read more


Charles Dickens

If an enthusiastic, ardent, and ambitous man marry a wife on whose name there is a stain, which, though it originate in no fault of hers, may be visited by cold and sordid people upon her, and upon his...

Read more


Charles Dickens

United metropolitan improved hot muffin and crumpet baking and punctual delivery company.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Constancy in love is a good thing; but it means nothing, and is nothing, without constancy in every kind of effort.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Listlessness to everything, but brooding sorrow, was the night that fell on my undisciplined heart. Let me look up from it - as at last I did, thank Heaven! - and from its long, sad, wretched dream, to...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Lord, keep my memory green.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Every man, however obscure, however far removed from the general recognition, is one of a group of men impressible for good, and impressible for evil, and it is in the nature of things that he cannot really...

Read more


Charles Dickens

If the law supposes that,' said Mr Bumble...' the law is an ass - an idiot.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Make them laugh, make them cry, make them wait.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is no worse, because I write of it. It would be no better, if I stopped my most unwilling hand. Nothing can undo it; nothing can make it otherwise than as it was.

Read more


Charles Dickens

....that the mounds of ices, and the bowls of mint-julep and sherry cobbler they make in these latitudes, are refreshments never to be thought of afterwards, in summer, by those who would preserve contented...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I verily believe that her not remembering and not minding in the least, made me cry again, inwardly - and that is the sharpest crying of all.

Read more


Charles Dickens

God bless us every one! said Tiny Tim, the last of all.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The New Year, like an Infant Heir to the whole world, was waited for, with welcomes, presents, and rejoicings.

Read more


Charles Dickens

And I am bored to death with it. Bored to death with this place, bored to death with my life, bored to death with myself.

Read more


Charles Dickens

May I tell you why it seems to me a good thing for us to remember wrong that has been done us? That we may forgive it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The sum of the whole is this: walk and be happy; walk and be healthy. The best way to lengthen out our days is to walk steadily and with a purpose.

Read more


Charles Dickens

So does a whole world, with all its greatnesses and littlenesses, lie in a twinkling star. And as mere human knowledge can split a ray of light and analyse the manner of its composition, so, sublimer intelligences...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Take a little timecount five-and-twenty,Tattycoram.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Wen you're a married man, Samivel, you'll understand a good many things as you don't understand now; but vether it's worth while goin' through so much to learn so little, as the charity-boy sand ven he...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Cheerfulness and contentment are great beautifiers, and are famous preservers of good looks.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Old Time, that greatest and longest established spinner of all!... his factory is a secret place, his work is noiseless, and his Hands are mutes.

Read more


Charles Dickens

One should never be ashamed to cry. Tears are rain on the dust of earth.

Read more


Charles Dickens

My advice is to never do tomorrow what you can do today. Procrastination is the thief of time.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There once was a child, and he strolled about a good deal, and thought of a number of things. He had a sister, who was a child too, and his constant companion. These two used to wonder all day long....

Read more


Charles Dickens

Stephen Blackpool fall into the loneliest of lives, the life of solitude among a familiar crowd. The stranger in the land who looks into ten thousand faces for some answering look and never finds it, is...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy. -Miss Havisham

Read more


Charles Dickens

My meaning is, that no man can expect his children to respect what he degrades.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Lawyers hold that there are two kinds of particularly bad witnesses--a reluctant witness, and a too-willing witness.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Veels vithin veels, a prison in a prison.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The American elite is almost beyond redemption. . . . Moral relativism has set in so deeply that the gilded classes have become incapable of discerning right from wrong. Everything can be explained away,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

To have a cricket on the hearth is the luckiest thing in all the world!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Now, what I want is, Facts. . . . Facts alone are wanted in life.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Train up a fig tree in the way it should go, and when you are old sit under the shade of it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart

Read more


Charles Dickens

Is it better to have had a good thing and lost it, or never to have had it?

Read more


Charles Dickens

Why should I disguise what you know so well, but what the crowd never dream of? We companies are all birds of prey; mere birds of prey. The only question is, whether in serving our own turn, we can serve...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Quadruped lions are said to be savage, only when they are hungry; biped lions are rarely sulky longer than when their appetite for distinction remains unappeased.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Judiciously show a cat milk, if you wish her to thirst for it. Judiciously show a dog his natural prey, if you wish him to bring it down one day.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There are some upon this earth of yours,' returned the Spirit, 'who lay claim to know us, and who do their deeds of passion, pride, ill-will, hatred, envy, bigotry, and selfishness in our name; who are...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Not knowing how he lost himself, or how he recovered himself, he may never feel certain of not losing himself again.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Time was with most of us, when Christmas Day, encircling all our limited world like a magic ring, left nothing out for us to miss or seek; bound together all our home enjoyments, affections, and hopes;...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Christmas time! That man must be a misanthrope indeed, in whose breast something like a jovial feeling is not roused - in whose mind some pleasant associations are not awakened - by the recurrence of Christmas.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The Christmas season reminds us that a demonstration of religion is always much better than a definition of it...especially in front of the kids. Perhaps the best Yuletide decorations are to be wreathed...

Read more


Charles Dickens

But I am sure that I have always thought of Christmas time, when it has come round...as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time; the only time I know of, in the long calendar of the year,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

There is something in sickness that breaks down the pride of manhood.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Ah, if only I had brought a cigar with me! This would have established my identity.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There might be some credit in being jolly.

Read more


Charles Dickens

External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm, no wintry weather chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Yes. He is quite a good fellow - nobody's enemy but his own.

Read more


Charles Dickens

But tears were not the things to find their way to Mr. Bumble’s soul; his heart was waterproof. Like washable beaver hats that improve with rain, his nerves were rendered stouter and more vigorous, by...

Read more


Charles Dickens

There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Let no man turn aside, ever so slightly, from the broad path of honour, on the plausible pretence that he is justified by the goodness of his end. All good ends can be worked out by good means.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Accidentally consumed five biscuits when I wasn't paying attention. Those biscuits are wily fellows - they leap in like sugary ninjas

Read more


Charles Dickens

But you were always a good man of business, Jacob,' faltered Scrooge, who now began to apply this to himself. Business!' cried the Ghost, wringing its hands again. "Mankind was my business; charity, mercy,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humour.

Read more


Charles Dickens

My hair stands on end at the cost and charges of these boys. Why was I ever a father! Why was my father ever a father!

Read more


Charles Dickens

It can't be supposed," said Joe. "Tho' I'm oncommon fond of reading, too." Are you, Joe?" Oncommon. Give me," said Joe, "a good book, or a good newspaper, and sit me down afore a good fire, and I ask no...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Poetry makes life what lights and music do the stage.

Read more


Charles Dickens

He went to the church, and walked about the streets, and watched the people hurrying to and for, and patted the children on the head, and questioned beggars, and looked down into the kitchens of homes,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

the dreams of childhood - it's airy fables, its graceful, beautiful, humane, impossible adornments of the world beyond; so good to be believed in once, so good to be remembered when outgrown...

Read more


Charles Dickens

He knew enough of the world to know that there is nothing in it better than the faithful service of the heart.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I would like to be going all over the kingdom...and acting everywhere. There's nothing in the world equal to seeing the house rise at you, one sea of delightful faces, one hurrah of applause!

Read more


Charles Dickens

I had seen the damp lying on the outside of my little window, as if some goblin had been crying there all night, and using the window for a pocket-handkerchief.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is well for a man to respect his own vocation whatever it is and to think himself bound to uphold it and to claim for it the respect it deserves

Read more


Charles Dickens

There seems a magic in the very name of Christmas.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Old Marley was as dead as a doornail. Mind! I don't mean to say that, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a doornail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is not possible to know how far the influence of any amiable, honest-hearted duty-doing man flies out into the world, but it is very possible to know how it has touched one's self in going by.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Eccentricities of genius.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Really, for a man who had been out of practice for so many years it was a splendid laugh!

Read more


Charles Dickens

We spent as much money as we could and got as little for it as people could make up their minds to give us. We were always more or less miserable, and most of our acquaintance were in the same condition....

Read more


Charles Dickens

To a young heart everything is fun.

Read more


Charles Dickens

In every life, no matter how full or empty ones purse, there is tragedy. It is the one promise life always fulfills. Thus, happiness is a gift, and the trick is not to expect it, but to delight in it when...

Read more


Charles Dickens

They don't mind it: its a reg'lar holiday to them - all porter and skittles.

Read more


Charles Dickens

My life is one demd horrid grind.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A multitude of people and yet solitude.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Love is not a feeling to pass away Like the balmy breath of a Summer's day....... Love is not a passion of earthly mould As a thirst for honour, or fame, or gold

Read more


Charles Dickens

And therefore, Uncle, though it has never put a scrap of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe that [Christmas] has done me good, and will do me good; and I say, God bless it!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Then tell Wind and Fire where to stop," returned madame; "but don't tell me.

Read more


Charles Dickens

How many young men, in all previous times of unprecedented steadiness, had turned suddenly wild and wicked for the same reason, and, in an ecstasy of unrequited love, taken to wrench off door-knockers,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I wish you to know that you have been the last dream of my soul...Since I knew you, I have been troubled by a remorse that I thought would never reproach me again, and have heard whispers from old voices...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Try to do unto others as you would have them do to you, and do not be discouraged if they fail sometimes. It is much better that they should fail than you should.

Read more


Charles Dickens

[She wasn't] a logically reasoning woman, but God is good, and hearts may count in heaven as high as heads.

Read more


Charles Dickens

So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pity in all the glittering multitude.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The two stand in the fast-thinning throng of victims, but they speak as if they were alone. Eye to eye, voice to voice, hand to hand, heart to heart, these two children of the Universal Mother, else so...

Read more


Charles Dickens

He did each single thing as if he did nothing else.

Read more


Charles Dickens

We must meet reverses boldly, and not suffer them to frighten us, my dear. We must learn to act the play out. We must live misfortune down, Trot!

Read more


Charles Dickens

I am light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am as merry as a schoolboy

Read more


Charles Dickens

Have you ever had the sensation of looking at someone for the first time and ever so quickly the past and future seem to fuse ? Does that not mean something ? That we felt so much, so deeply, before even...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The great grindstone, Earth, had turned when Mr. Lorry looked out again, and the sun was red on the courtyard. But, the lesser grindstone stood alone there in the calm morning air, with red upon it that...

Read more


Charles Dickens

This reminds me, Godmother, to ask you a serious question. You are as wise as wise can be (having been brought up by the fairies), and you can tell me this: Is it better to have had a good thing and lost...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Men's courses will foreshadow certain ends, to which, if persevered in, they must lead," said Scrooge. "But if the courses be departed from, the ends will change.

Read more


Charles Dickens

And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death. And O what a bright old song it is, that O 'tis love, 'tis love, 'tis love that makes the world go round!

Read more


Charles Dickens

At last, however, he began to think -- as you or I would have thought at first; for it is always the person not in the predicament who knows what ought to have been done in it, and would unquestionably...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be. I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape.

Read more


Charles Dickens

it is a principle of his that no man who was not a true gentleman at heart, ever was, since the world began, a true gentleman in manner. He says, no varnish can hide the grain of the wood; and that the...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It's in vain to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Possibly we might even improve the world a little, if we got up early in the morning, and took off our coats to the work.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A display of indifference to all the actions and passions of mankind was not supposed to be such a distinguished quality at that time, I think, as I have observed it to be considered since. I have known...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It will be your duty, and it will be your pleasure too to estimate her (as you chose her) by the qualities that she has, and not by the qualities she may not have.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I thought it very touching to see these two women, coarse and shabby and beaten, so united; to see what they could be to one another; to see how they felt for one another, how the heart of each to each...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Then idiots talk....of Energy. If there is a word in the dictionary under any letter from A to Z that I abominate, it is energy. It is such a conventional superstition, such parrot gabble! What the deuce!....But...

Read more


Charles Dickens

What is peace? Is it war? No. Is it strife? No. Is it lovely, and gentle, and beautiful, and pleasant, and serene, and joyful? O yes!

Read more


Charles Dickens

I believe that the heaviest blow ever dealt at liberty's head will be dealt by this nation in the ultimate failure of its example to the earth.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Why then we should drop into poetry.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A commission of haberdashers could alone have reported what the rest of her poor dress was made of, but it had a strong general resemblance to seaweed, with here and there a gigantic tea-leaf. Her shawl...

Read more


Charles Dickens

She forgot to be shy at the moment, in honestly warning him away from the sunken wreck he had a dream of raising; and looked at him with eyes which assuredly, in association with her patient face, her...

Read more


Charles Dickens

All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretences did I cheat myself.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Can I view thee panting, lying On thy stomach, without sighing; Can I unmoved see thee dying On a log Expiring frog!

Read more


Charles Dickens

New thoughts and hopes were whirling through my mind, and all the colours of my life were changing.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The universe, he observed, makes rather an indifferent parent, I am afraid.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Friendship? Yes Please.

Read more


Charles Dickens

We went our several ways," said Lady Dedlock, "and had little in common even before we agreed to differ. It is to be regretted, I suppose, but it could not be helped.

Read more


Charles Dickens

One always begins to forgive a place as soon as it's left behind.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The last trumpet ever to be sounded shall blow even algebra to wreck.

Read more


Charles Dickens

"Why, I don't exactly know about perjury, my dear sir," replied the little gentleman. "Harsh word, my dear sir, very harsh word indeed. It's a legal fiction, my dear sir, nothing more."

Read more


Charles Dickens

Come, let's be a comfortable couple and take care of each other! How glad we shall be, that we have somebody we are fond of always, to talk to and sit with.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss, and, in their struggles to be truly free, in their triumphs and defeats, through long years to come, I see the evil of this time and...

Read more


Charles Dickens

When I have come to you, at last (as I have always done), I have come to peace and happiness. I come home, now, like a tired traveller, and find such a blessed sense of rest!

Read more


Charles Dickens

what I want you to be - I don't mean physically but morally: you are very well physically - is a firm fellow, a fine firm fellow, with a will of your own, with resolution. with determination. with strength...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The streets looked small, of course. The streets that we have only seen as children always do I believe when we go back to them

Read more


Charles Dickens

things cannot be expected to turn up of themselves. We must in a measure assist to turn them up

Read more


Charles Dickens

the sight of me is good for sore eyes

Read more


Charles Dickens

Try not to associate bodily defect with mental, my good friend, except for a solid reason

Read more


Charles Dickens

There can't be a quarrel without two parties, and I won't be one. I will be a friend to you in spite of you. So now you know what you've got to expect

Read more


Charles Dickens

Industry is the soul of business and the keystone of prosperity.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I recollected one story there was in the village, how that on a certain night in the year (it might be that very night for anything I knew), all the dead people came out of the ground and sat at the heads...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Change begets change.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I know enough of the world now to have almost lost the capacity of being much surprised by anything

Read more


Charles Dickens

Change begets change. Nothing propagates so fast. If a man habituated to a narrow circle of cares and pleasures, out of which he seldom travels, step beyond it, though for never so brief a space, his departure...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Least said, soonest mended

Read more


Charles Dickens

Change begets change. Nothing propagates so fast.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The wind is rushing after us, and the clouds are flying after us, and the moon is plunging after us, and the whole wild night is in pursuit of us; but, so far we are pursued by nothing else.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Look round and round upon this bare bleak plain, and see even here, upon a winter's day, how beautiful the shadows are! Alas! It is the nature of their kind to be so. The loveliest things in life... are...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Remembrance, like a candle, burns brightest at Christmastime.

Read more


Charles Dickens

All of us have wonders hidden in our breasts, only needing circumstances to evoke them.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Dreams are the bright creatures of poem and legend, who sport on earth in the night season, and melt away in the first beam of the sun, which lights grim care and stern reality on their daily pilgrimage...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Let me feel now what sharp distress I may.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Detestation of the high is the involuntary homage of the low.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Drive him fast to his tomb. This, from Jacques.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The year end brings no greater pleasure then the opportunity to express to you season's greetings and good wishes. May your holidays and new year be filled with joy.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A heart well worth winning, and well won. A heart that, once won, goes through fire and water for the winner, and never changes, and is never daunted.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I loved you madly; in the distasteful work of the day, in the wakeful misery of the night, girded by sordid realities, or wandering through Paradises and Hells of visions into which I rushed, carrying...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Do you want to be a gentleman, to spite her or to gain her over? Because, if it is to spite her, I should think - but you know best - that might be better and more independently done by caring nothing...

Read more


Charles Dickens

We never tire of the friendships we form with books.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A silent look of affection and regard when all other eyes are turned coldly away-the consciousness that we possess the sympathy and affection of one being when all others have deserted us-is a hold, a...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Mrs Joe was a very clean housekeeper, but had an exquisite art of making her clenliness more umcomfortable and unacceptable than dirt itself. Cleanliness is next to godliness, and some people do the same...

Read more


Charles Dickens

if the world go wrong, it was, in some off-hand manner, never meant to go right.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I must do something or I shall wear my heart away...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Thus violent deeds live after men upon the earth, and traces of war and bloodshed will survive in mournful shapes long after those who worked the desolation are but atoms of earth themselves.

Read more


Charles Dickens

If I dropped a tear upon your hand, may it wither it up! If I spoke a gentle word in your hearing, may it deafen you! If I touched you with my lips, may the touch be poison to you! A curse upon this roof...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one....

Read more


Charles Dickens

What an immense impression Paris made upon me. It is the most extraordinary place in the world!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Come, then," returned the nephew gaily. "What right have you to be dismal? What reason have you to be morose? You're rich enough.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It was a long and gloomy night that gathered on me, haunted by the ghosts of many hopes, of many dear remembrances, many errors, many unavailing sorrows and regrets.

Read more


Charles Dickens

When men are about to commit, or sanction the commission of some injustice, it is not uncommon for them to express pity for the object either of that or some parallel proceeding, and to feel themselves,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Champagne is one of the elegant extras in life.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I have nothing else to tell; unless, indeed, I were to confess that no one can ever believe this narrative, in the reading, more than I have believed it in the writing.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Moths, and all sorts of ugly creatures, hover about a lighted candle. Can the candle help it?

Read more


Charles Dickens

You are too young to know how the world changes everyday,' said Mrs Creakle, 'and how the people in it pass away. But we all have to learn it, David; some of us when we are young, some of us when we are...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is when our budding hopes are nipped beyond recovery by some rough wind, that we are the most disposed to picture to ourselves what flowers they might have borne, if they had flourished . . .

Read more


Charles Dickens

The two commonest mistakes in judgement ... are, the confounding of shyness with arrogance - a very common mistake indeed - and the not understanding that an obstinate nature exists in a perpetual struggle...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Have a heart that never hardens

Read more


Charles Dickens

You should know," said Estella. "I am what you have made me. Take all the praise, take all the blame; take all the success, take all the failure; in short, take me.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You are part of my existence, part of myself. You have been in every line I have ever read, since I first came here, the rough common boy whose poor heart you wounded even then. You have been in every...

Read more


Charles Dickens

She dotes on poetry, sir. She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself, sir. You may have met with her 'Ode...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It would have been cruel in Miss Havisham, horribly cruel, to practise on the susceptibility of a poor boy, and to torture me through all these years with a vain hope and an idle pursuit, if she had reflected...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible. Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Love her, love her, love her! If she favours you, love her. If she wounds you, love her. If she tears your heart to pieces – and as it gets older and stronger, it will tear deeper – love her, love...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I'll tell you," said she, in the same hurried passionate whisper, "what real love it. It is blind devotion, unquestioning self-humiliation, utter submission, trust and belief against yourself and against...

Read more


Charles Dickens

There was something very comfortable in having plenty of stationery.

Read more


Charles Dickens

"It wasn't the wine," murmured Mr. Snodgrass, in a broken voice. "It was the salmon."

Read more


Charles Dickens

I must be taken as I have been made. The success is not mine, the failure is not mine, but the two together make me.

Read more


Charles Dickens

In fine weather the old gentelman is almost constantly in the garden; and when it is too wet to go into it, he will look out the window at it, by the hour together. He has always something to do there,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

What connexion can there be, between the place in Lincolnshire, the house in town, the Mercury in powder, and the whereabout of Jo the outlaw with the broom, who had that distant ray of light upon him...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The secret was such an old one now, had so grown into me and become a part of myself, that I could not tear it away.

Read more


Charles Dickens

He lived in chambers that had once belonged to his deceased partner. They were a gloomy suite of rooms, in a lowering pile of building up a yard, where it had so little business to be, that one could scarcely...

Read more


Charles Dickens

This is the even-handed dealing of the world!" he said. "There is noth-ing on which it is so hard as poverty; and there is nothing it professes tocondemn with such severity as the pursuit of wealth!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Why, Mrs. Piper has a good deal to say, chiefly in parentheses and without punctuation, but not much to tell.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Nothingever happened on this globe, for good, at which some people did not have their fill of laughter in the onset; and knowing that such as these would be blind anyway, he thought it quite as well that...

Read more


Charles Dickens

There's more of gravey than grave about you, whatever you are!" - Scrooge, referring to Marley's ghost which he believes is a hallucination from food poisoning

Read more


Charles Dickens

Never sign a valentine with your own name.

Read more


Charles Dickens

it's not my business," Scrooge returned. "It's enough for a man to understand his own business, and not to interfere with other people's. Mine occupies me constantly.

Read more


Charles Dickens

When I speak of home, I speak of the place where in default of a better--those I love are gathered together; and if that place where a gypsy's tent, or a barn, I should call it by the same good name notwithstanding.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Christmas is a poor excuse every 25th of December to pick a man's pockets.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Please, sir, I want some more.

Read more


Charles Dickens

We all have some experience of a feeling, that comes over us occasionally, of what we are saying and doing having been said and done before, in a remote time - of our having been surrounded, dim ages ago,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

A man is lucky if he is the first love of a woman. A woman is lucky if she is the last love of a man.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A loving heart is the truest wisdom.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Happy, happy Christmas, that can win us back to the delusions of our childhood days, recall to the old man the pleasures of his youth, and transport the traveler back to his own fireside and quiet home!

Read more


Charles Dickens

I will honor Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Electric communication will never be a substitute for the face of someone who with their soul encourages another person to be brave and true.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A day wasted on others is not wasted on one's self.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There is a wisdom of the head, and a wisdom of the heart.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Reflect upon your present blessings of which every man has many - not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The whole difference between construction and creation is exactly this: that a thing constructed can only be loved after it is constructed; but a thing created is loved before it exists.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The pain of parting is nothing to the joy of meeting again.

Read more


Charles Dickens

To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart.

Read more


Charles Dickens

If there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do it well; whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself completely; in great aims and in small I have always thoroughly...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I have known a vast quantity of nonsense talked about bad men not looking you in the face. Don't trust that conventional idea. Dishonesty will stare honesty out of countenance any day in the week, if there...

Read more


Charles Dickens

No one is useless in this world who lightens the burden of it to anyone else.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It was one of those March days when the sun shines hot and the wind blows cold: when it is summer in the light, and winter in the shade.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I never could have done what I have done without the habits of punctuality, order, and diligence, without the determination to concentrate myself on one subject at a time.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Cows are my passion. What I have ever sighed for has been to retreat to a Swiss farm, and live entirely surrounded by cows - and china.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Life is made of ever so many partings welded together.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Credit is a system whereby a person who can not pay gets another person who can not pay to guarantee that he can pay.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship; and pass the rosy wine.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There is nothing so strong or safe in an emergency of life as the simple truth.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper; so cry away.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Regrets are the natural property of grey hairs.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

Read more


Charles Dickens

An idea, like a ghost, must be spoken to a little before it will explain itself.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Home is a name, a word, it is a strong one; stronger than magician ever spoke, or spirit ever answered to, in the strongest conjuration.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The men who learn endurance, are they who call the whole world, brother.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Papa, potatoes, poultry, prunes and prism, are all very good words for the lips.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Any man may be in good spirits and good temper when he's well dressed. There ain't much credit in that.

Read more


Charles Dickens

In the little world in which children have their existence, whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt, as injustice.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own; and from morning to night, as from the cradle to the grave, it is but a succession of changes so gentle and easy that we can scarcely mark...

Read more


Charles Dickens

A boy's story is the best that is ever told.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.

Read more


Charles Dickens

We forge the chains we wear in life.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Vices are sometimes only virtues carried to excess!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Great men are seldom over-scrupulous in the arrangement of their attire.

Read more


Charles Dickens

'Tis love that makes the world go round, my baby.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There are books of which the backs and covers are by far the best parts.

Read more


Charles Dickens

He would make a lovely corpse.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There are strings in the human heart that had better not be vibrated.

Read more


Charles Dickens

He had but one eye and the pocket of prejudice runs in favor of two.

Read more


Charles Dickens

When a man bleeds inwardly, it is a dangerous thing for himself; but when he laughs inwardly, it bodes no good to other people.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Oh the nerves, the nerves; the mysteries of this machine called man! Oh the little that unhinges it, poor creatures that we are!

Read more


Charles Dickens

The one great principle of English law is to make business for itself.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Anything for the quick life, as the man said when he took the situation at the lighthouse.

Read more


Charles Dickens

'Do you spell it with a 'V' or a 'W'?' inquired the judge. 'That depends upon the taste and fancy of the speller, my Lord'.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Most men are individuals no longer so far as their business, its activities, or its moralities are concerned. They are not units but fractions.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The age of chivalry is past. Bores have succeeded to dragons.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You don't carry in your countenance a letter of recommendation.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It's my old girl that advises. She has the head. But I never own to it before her. Discipline must be maintained.

Read more


Charles Dickens

May not the complaint, that common people are above their station, often take its rise in the fact of uncommon people being below theirs?

Read more


Charles Dickens

Renunciation remains sorrow, though a sorrow borne willingly.

Read more


Charles Dickens

That sort of half sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity's small change in general society.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There are not a few among the disciples of charity who require, in their vocation, scarcely less excitement than the votaries of pleasure in theirs.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There are only two styles of portrait painting; the serious and the smirk.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Although a skillful flatterer is a most delightful companion if you have him all to yourself, his taste becomes very doubtful when he takes to complimenting other people.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A person who can't pay gets another person who can't pay to guarantee that he can pay. Like a person with two wooden legs getting another person with two wooden legs to guarantee that he has got two natural...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Send forth the child and childish man together, and blush for the pride that libels our own old happy state, and gives its title to an ugly and distorted image.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is a pleasant thing to reflect upon, and furnishes a complete answer to those who contend for the gradual degeneration of the human species, that every baby born into the world is a finer one than the...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Prowling about the rooms, sitting down, getting up, stirring the fire, looking out the window, teasing my hair, sitting down to write, writing nothing, writing something and tearing it up...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Repression is the only lasting philosophy. The dark deference of fear and slavery, my friend, will keep the dogs obedient to the whip, as long as this roof shuts out the sky.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Be natural my children. For the writer that is natural has fulfilled all the rules of art.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It being a remarkable fact in theatrical history, but one long since established beyond dispute, that it is a hopeless endeavor to attract people to a theatre unless they can be first brought to believe...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The cloud of caring for nothing, which overshadowed him with such a fatal darkness, was very rarely pierced by the light within him.

Read more


Charles Dickens

All through it, I have known myself to be quite undeserving. And yet I have had the weakness, and have still the weakness, to wish you to know with what a sudden mastery you kindled me, heap of ashes that...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I distress you; I draw fast to an end.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The boy was lying, fast asleep, on a rude bed upon the floor; so pale with anxiety, and sadness, and the closeness of his prison, that he looked like death; not death as it shews in shroud and coffin,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Women can always put things in fewest words. Except when it's blowing up; and then they lengthens it out.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The present representative of the Dedlocks is an excellent master.He supposes all his dependents to be utterly bereft of individual characters, intentions or opinions, and is persuaded that he was born...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Morning drew on apace. The air became more sharp and piercing, as its first dull hue: the death of night, rather than the birth of day: glimmered faintly in the sky. The objects which had looked dim and...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The doctor seemed especially troubled by the fact of the robbery having been unexpected, and attempted in the night-time; as if it were the established custom of gentlemen in the housebreaking way to transact...

Read more


Charles Dickens

If ever household affections and loves are graceful things, they are graceful in the poor. The ties that bind the wealthy and the proud to home may be forged on earth, but those which link the poor man...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Happiness is a gift and the trick is not to expect it, but to delight in it when it comes.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You touch some of the reasons for my going, not for my staying away.

Read more


Charles Dickens

That glorious vision of doing good is so often the sanguine mirage of so many good minds.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I know that she deserves the best and purest love the heart of man can offer," said Mrs. Maylie; "I know that the devotion and affection of her nature require no ordinary return, but one that shall be...

Read more


Charles Dickens

My heart is set, as firmly as ever heart of man was set on woman. I have no thought, no view, no hope, in life beyond her; and if you oppose me in this great stake, you take my peace and happiness in your...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is because I think so much of warm and sensitive hearts, that I would spare them from being wounded.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Such is the influence which the condition of our own thoughts, exercises, even over the appearance of external objects. Men who look on nature, and their fellow-men, and cry that all is dark and gloomy,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The dew seemed to sparkle more brightly on the green leaves the air to rustle among them with a sweeter music and the sky itself to look more blue and bright. Such is the influence which the condition...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I confess I have yet to learn that a lesson of the purest good may not be drawn from the vilest evil.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Mankind was my business... charity, mercy, forbearance, benevolence, were all my business.

Read more


Charles Dickens

One great blemish in the popular mind of America and the prolific parent of an innumerable brood of evils, is Universal Distrust . . . you no sooner set up an idol firmly, than you are sure to pull it...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Minds, like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled, ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I am not old, but my young way was never the way to age.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons...

Read more


Charles Dickens

He has the power to render us happy or unhappy; to make our service light or burdensome; a pleasure or a toil. Say that his power lies in words and looks; in things so slight and insignificant that it...

Read more


Charles Dickens

And O there are days in this life, worth life and worth death.

Read more


Charles Dickens

My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I believe the spreading of Catholicism to be the most horrible means of political and social degradation left in the world.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Never," said my aunt, "be mean in anything; never be false; never be cruel. Avoid those three vices, Trot, and I can always be hopeful of you.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The New Testament is the very best book that ever was or ever will be known in the world.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The sun,--the bright sun, that brings back, not light alone, but new life, and hope, and freshness to man--burst upon the crowded city in clear and radiant glory. Through costly-coloured glass and paper-mended...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Your tale is of the longest," observed Monks, moving restlessly in his chair. It is a true tale of grief and trial, and sorrow, young man," returned Mr. Brownlow, "and such tales usually are; if it were...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Let the tears which fell, and the broken words which were exchanged in the long close embrace between the orphans, be sacred. A father, sister, and mother, were gained, and lost, in that one moment. Joy...

Read more


Charles Dickens

In the moonlight which is always sad, as the light of the sun itself is--as the light called human life is--at its coming and its going.

Read more


Charles Dickens

If they would rather die, . . . they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population.

Read more


Charles Dickens

And it was always said of him, that he knew how to keep Christmas well, if any man alive possessed the knowledge. May that be truly said of us, and all of us! And so, as Tiny Tim observed, God bless Us,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Are there no prisons?

Read more


Charles Dickens

The most important thing in life is to stop saying 'I wish' and start saying 'I will.' Consider nothing impossible, then treat possibilities as probabilities.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Time has been lost and opportunity thrown away, but I am yet a young man, and may retrieve it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

We must leave the discovery of this mystery, like all others, to time, and accident, and Heaven's pleasure.

Read more


Charles Dickens

In the Destroyer's steps there spring up bright creations that defy his power, and his dark path becomes a way of light to Heaven.

Read more


Charles Dickens

But the moon came slowly up in all her gentle glory, and the stars looked out, and through the small compass of the grated window, as through the narrow crevice of one good deed in a murky life of guilt,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Some of the craftiest scoundrels that ever walked this earth . . . will gravely jot down in diaries the events of every day, and keep a regular debtor and creditor account with heaven, which shall always...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Heaven above was blue, and earth beneath was green; the river glistened like a path of diamonds in the sun; the birds poured forth their songs from the shady trees; the lark soared high above the waving...

Read more


Charles Dickens

In this way they went on, and on, and on-in the language of the story-books-until at last the village lights appeared before them, and the church spire cast a long reflection on the graveyard grass; as...

Read more


Charles Dickens

If you can't get to be uncommon through going straight, you'll never get to do it through going crooked. [...] live well and die happy.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Fog everywhere. Fog up the river where it flows among green airs and meadows; fog down the river, where it rolls defiled among the tiers of shipping, and the waterside pollutions of a great (and dirty)...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The leprosy of unreality disfigured every human creature in attendance.

Read more


Charles Dickens

No space of regret can make amends for one life's opportunity misused

Read more


Charles Dickens

He was wise enough to know that nothing ever happened on this globe, for good, at which some people did not have their fill of laughter in the outset

Read more


Charles Dickens

For it is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was a child Himself.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I don't know what to do!" cried Scrooge, laughing and crying in the same breath; and making a perfect Laocoön of himself with his stockings. "I am as light as a feather, I am as happy as an angel, I am...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Vengeance and retribution require a long time; it is the rule.

Read more


Charles Dickens

and, unlike the celebrated herd in the poem, they were not forty children conducting themselves as one, but every child was conducting itself like forty.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I am what you designed me to be.I am your blade. You cannot now complain if you also feel the hurt

Read more


Charles Dickens

And how did little Tim behave?” asked Mrs Cratchit, when she had rallied Bob on his credulity and Bob had hugged his daughter to his heart’s content. “As good as gold,” said Bob, “and better....

Read more


Charles Dickens

I will die here where I have walked. And I will walk here, though I am in my grave. I will walk here until the pride of this house is humbled.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I saw that the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress, and like the flowers, and had no brightness left but the brightness of her sunken eyes.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I have heard it said that as we keep our birthdays when we are alive, so the ghosts of dead people, who are not easy in their graves, keep the day they died upon.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Around and around the house the leaves fall thick, but never fast, for they come circling down with a dead lightness that is sombre and slow.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There was a frosty rime upon the trees, which, in the faint light of the clouded moon, hung upon the smaller branches like dead garlands.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Accidents will occur in the best regulated families.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show. To begin my life with the beginning of my life, I record that I was...

Read more


Charles Dickens

My dear if you could give me a cup of tea to clear my muddle of a head I should better understand your affairs.

Read more


Charles Dickens

And can it be that in a world so full and busy the loss of one creature makes a void so wide and deep that nothing but the width and depth of eternity can fill it up!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Perhaps second-hand cares, like second-hand clothes, come easily off and on.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Little Red Riding Hood was my first love. I felt that if I could have married Little Red Riding Hood, I should have known perfect bliss.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Most men unconsciously judge the world from themselves, and it will be very generally found that those who sneer habitually at human nature, and affect to despise it, are among its worst and least pleasant...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The coffee was boiling over a charcoal fire, and large slices of bread and butter were piled one upon the other like deals in a lumber yard.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You know what I am going to say. I love you. What other men may mean when they use that expression, I cannot tell. What I mean is that I am under the influence of some tremendous attraction which I have...

Read more


Charles Dickens

She was more than human to me. She was a Fairy, a Sylph. I don't know what she was, anything that no one ever saw, and everything that everybody ever wanted. I was swallowed up in an abyss of love in an...

Read more


Charles Dickens

The first rule of business is: Do other men for they would do you

Read more


Charles Dickens

Darkness is cheap, and Scrooge liked it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The one great principle of the English law is, to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings. Viewed by this...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Missionaries are perfect nuisances and leave every place worse than they found it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

On the eve of long voyages or an absence of many years, friends who are tenderly attached will seperate with the usual look, the usual pressure of the hand, planning one final interview for the morrow,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

A very little key will open a very heavy door.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Tongue; well that's a wery good thing when it an't a woman.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I took a good deal o' pains with his eddication, sir; let him run in the streets when he was very young, and shift for hisself. It's the only way to make a boy sharp, sir.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A new heart for a New Year, always!

Read more


Charles Dickens

The word of a gentleman is as good as his bond; and sometimes better.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It was a good thing to have a couple of thousand people all rigid and frozen together, in the palm of one's hand.

Read more


Charles Dickens

For the rest of his life, Oliver Twist remembers a single word of blessing spoken to him by another child because this word stood out so strikingly from the consistent discouragement around him.

Read more


Charles Dickens

We know, Mr. Weller - we, who are men of the world - that a good uniform must work its way with the women, sooner or later.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Dickens writes that an event, "began to be forgotten, as most affairs are, when wonder, having no fresh food to support it, dies away of itself.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Sudden shifts and changes are no bad preparation for political life.

Read more


Charles Dickens

This is a world of action, and not moping and droning in.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Subdue your appetites, my dears, and you've conquered human nature .

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is a long time,' repeated his wife; 'and when is it not a long time? Vengeance and retribution require a long time; it is the rule.' 'It does not take a long time to strike a man with Lightning,' said...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Keep out of Chancery. It's being ground to bits in a slow mill; it's being roasted at a slow fire; it's being stung to death by single bees; it's being drowned by drops; it's going mad by grains.

Read more


Charles Dickens

They are so filthy and bestial that no honest man would admit one into his house for a water-closet doormat.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Houses were knocked down... enormous heaps of earth and clay thrown up; buildings that were undermined and shaking, propped up by great beams of wood... The yet unfinished and unopened Railway was in progress.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Ask no questions, and you'll be told no lies.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You know what I am going to say. I love you. What other men may mean when they use that expression, I cannot tell; what I mean is, that I am under the influence of some tremendous attraction which I have...

Read more


Charles Dickens

But, tears were not the things to find their way to Mr. Bumble's soul; his heart was waterproof.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Keep up appearances whatever you do.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It was a harder day's journey than yesterday's, for there were long and weary hills to climb; and in journeys, as in life, it is a great deal easier to go down hill than up. However, they kept on, with...

Read more


Charles Dickens

In seasons of pestilence, some of us will have a secret attraction to the disease--a terrible passing inclination to die of it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Go ye, who rest so placidly upon the sacred Bard who had been young, and when he strung his harp was old, and had never seen the righteous forsaken, or his seed begging their bread; go, Teachers of content...

Read more


Charles Dickens

a most excellent man, though I could have wished his trousers not quite so tight in some places and not quite so loose in others.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I have been bent and broken, but - I hope - into a better shape.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You can't make a head and brains out of a brass knob with nothing in it. You couldn't do it when your uncle George was living much less when he's dead.

Read more


Charles Dickens

A merry Christmas to everybody! A happy New Year to the world!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Spring is the time of year when it is summer in the sun and winter in the shade.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I was so humiliated, hurt, spurned, offended, angry, sorry--I cannot hit upon the right name for the smart--God knows what its name was--that tears started to my eyes.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Her contempt for me was so strong, that it became infectious, and I caught it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You might, from your appearance, be the wife of Lucifer,” said Miss Pross, in her breathing. “Nevertheless, you shall not get the better of me. I am an Englishwoman.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Many merry Christmases, many happy New Years. Unbroken friendships, great accumulations of cheerful recollections and affections on earth, and heaven for us all.

Read more


Charles Dickens

In love of home, the love of country has its rise.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Father Time is not always a hard parent and though he tarries for none of his children, often lays his hand lightly upon those who have used him well; making them old men and women inexorably enough, but...

Read more


Charles Dickens

You hear, Eugene?' said Lightwood over his shoulder. 'You are deeply interested in lime.' 'Without lime,' returned that unmoved barrister at law, 'my existence would be unilluminated by a ray of hope.

Read more


Charles Dickens

And yet I love him. I love him so much and so dearly, that when I sometimes think my life may be but a weary one, I am proud of it and glad of it. I am proud and glad to suffer something for him, even...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I never thought before, that there was a woman in the world who could affect me so much by saying so little. But don't be hard in your construction of me. You don't know what my state of mind towards you...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It was darkly rumoured that the butler, regarding him with favour such as that stern man had never shown before to mortal boy, had sometimes mingled porter with his table beer to make him strong.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Now, what I want is Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the minds of reasoning animals...

Read more


Charles Dickens

"What is your best, your very best, ale a glass?" "Two pence halfpenny," says the landlord, "is the price of the Genuine Stunning Ale." "Then," says I, producing the money, "just draw me a glass of the...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Take the pencil and write under my name, 'I forgive her.

Read more


Charles Dickens

And still I stood looking at the house, thinking how happy I should be if I lived there with her, and knowing that I never was happy with her, but always miserable.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I feel an earnest and humble desire, and shall do till I die, to increase the stock of harmless cheerfulness.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Then I'm sorry to say, I've eat your pie.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Such is hope, heaven's own gift to struggling mortals, pervading, like some subtle essence from the skies, all things both good and bad.

Read more


Charles Dickens

My dear young lady, crime, like death, is not confined to the old and withered alone. The youngest and fairest are too often its chosen victims.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Of little worth as life is when we misuse it, it is worth that effort. It would cost nothing to lay down if it were not.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Reflect upon your present blessings

Read more


Charles Dickens

To be shelterless and alone in the open country, hearing the wind moan and watching for day through the whole long weary night; to listen to the falling rain, and crouch for warmth beneath the lee of some...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Scattered wits take a long time in picking up.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I find my breath gets short, but it seldom gets longer as a man gets older. I take it as it comes, and make the most of it. That's the best way, ain't it?

Read more


Charles Dickens

Probably every new and eagerly expected garment ever put on since clothes came in, fell a trifle short of the wearer's expectation.

Read more


Charles Dickens

What are the odds so long as the fire of the soul is kindled at the taper of conviviality, and the wing of friendship never molts a feather?

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is known, to the force of a single pound weight, what the engine will do; but, not all the calculators of the National Debt can tell me the capacity for good or evil, for love or hatred, for patriotism...

Read more


Charles Dickens

But the sun itself, however beneficent, generally, was less kind to Coketown than hard frost, and rarely looked intently into any of its closer regions without engendering more death than life. So does...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I stole her heart away and put ice in its place.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Their demeanor is invariably morose, sullen, clownish and repulsive. I should think there is not, on the face of the earth, a people so entirely destitute of humor, vivacity, or the capacity for enjoyment.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Marley was dead, to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it. And Scrooge's...

Read more


Charles Dickens

and it was not until I began to think, that I began fully to know how wrecked I was, and how the ship in which I had sailed was gone to pieces.

Read more


Charles Dickens

We changed again, and yet again, and it was now too late and too far to go back, and I went on. And the mists had all solemnly risen now, and the world lay spread before me.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I see a beautiful city and a brilliant people rising from this abyss. I see the lives for which I lay down my life, peaceful, useful, prosperous and happy. I see that I hold a sanctuary in their hearts,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of underdone potato. There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Mr Jarndyce, and prevented his going any farther, when he had remarked that there were two classes of charitable people: one, the people who did a little and made a great deal of noise; the other, the...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I took her hand in mine, and we went out of the ruined place; and, as the morning mists had risen long ago when I first left the forge, so, the evening mists were rising now, and in all the broad expanse...

Read more


Charles Dickens

In a word, I was too cowardly to do what I knew to be right, as I had been too cowardly to avoid doing what I knew to be wrong.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Liberty, equality, fraternity, or death; - the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine!

Read more


Charles Dickens

You fear the world too much,' she answered gently. 'All your other hopes have merged into the hope of being beyond the chance of its sordid reproach. I have seen your nobler aspirations fall off, one by...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I only ask to be free. The butterflies are free. Mankind will surely not deny to Harold Skimpole what it concedes to the butterflies.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I see that I hold a sanctuary in their hearts, and in the hearts of their descendants, generations hence. I see her, an old woman, weeping for me on the anniversary of this day. I see her and her husband,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I wear the chain I forged in life....I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Give me a moment, because I like to cry for joy. It's so delicious, John dear, to cry for joy.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There is prodigious strength in sorrow and despair.

Read more


Charles Dickens

But, in this separation I associate you only with the good and I will faithfully hold you to that always, for you have done far more good than harm, let me feel now what sharp distress I may.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There is a passion for hunting something deeply implanted in the human breast.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Mystery and disappointment are not absolutely indispensable to the growth of love, but they are, very often, its powerful auxiliaries.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I have a heart to be stabbed in or shot in, I have no doubt, and, of course, if it ceased to beat, I would cease to be. But you know what I mean. I have no softness there, no—sympathy—sentiment—nonsense.

Read more


Charles Dickens

All partings foreshadow the great final one.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I was always treated as if I had insisted on being born, in opposition to the dictates of reason, religion, and morality, and against the dissuadinig arguments of my best friends.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Marley was dead: to begin with.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You are in every line I have ever read.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There wasn't room to swing a cat there.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The broken heart. You think you will die, but you just keep living, day after day after terrible day.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Procrastination is the thief of time, collar him.

Read more


Charles Dickens

No one who can read, ever looks at a book, even unopened on a shelf, like one who cannot.

Read more


Charles Dickens

‎And yet I have had the weakness, and have still the weakness, to wish you to know with what a sudden mastery you kindled me, heap of ashes that I am, into fire.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Trifles make the sum of life.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The privileges of the side-table included the small prerogatives of sitting next to the toast, and taking two cups of tea to other people's one.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Polly put the kettle on, we'll all have tea.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I had considered how the things that never happen, are often as much realities to us, in their effects, as those that are accomplished.

Read more


Charles Dickens

…a lady of what is commonly called an uncertain temper --a phrase which being interpreted signifies a temper tolerably certain to make everybody more or less uncomfortable.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Death may beget life, but oppression can beget nothing other than itself.

Read more


Charles Dickens

On the motionless branches of some trees, autumn berries hung like clusters of coral beads, as in those fabled orchards where the fruits were jewels . . .

Read more


Charles Dickens

[S]he stood for some moments gazing at the sisters, with affection beaming in one eye, and calculation shining out of the other.

Read more


Charles Dickens

We need never be ashamed of our tears.

Read more


Charles Dickens

And what an example of the power of dress young Oliver Twist was! Wrapped in the blanket which had hitherto formed his only covering, he might have been the child of a nobleman or a beggar;—it would...

Read more


Charles Dickens

They are Man's and they cling to me, appealing from their fathers. This boy is Ignorance and this girl is Want. Beware them both, and all of their degree, but most of all beware this boy for on his brow...

Read more


Charles Dickens

every idiot who goes about with a 'Merry Christmas' on his lips should be boiled with his own pudding, and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Other sound than the owl's voice there was none, save the falling of a fountain into its stone basin; for, it was one of those dark nights that hold their breath by the hour together, and then heave a...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I hope that real love and truth are stronger in the end than any evil or misfortune in the world.

Read more


Charles Dickens

In a utilitarian age, of all other times, it is a matter of grave importance that fairy tales should be respected.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I want to escape from myself. For when I do start up and stare myself seedily in the face, as happens to be my case at present, my blankness is inconceivable--indescribable--my misery amazing.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I revere the memory of Mr. F. as an estimable man and most indulgent husband, only necessary to mention Asparagus and it appeared or to hint at any little delicate thing to drink and it came like magic...

Read more


Charles Dickens

If Husain (as) had fought to quench his worldly desires…then I do not understand why his sister, wife, and children accompanied him. It stands to reason therefore, that he sacrificed purely for Islam.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Dead, your Majesty. Dead, my lords and gentlemen. Dead, Right Reverends and Wrong Reverends of every order. Dead, men and women, born with Heavenly compassion in your hearts. And dying thus around us every...

Read more


Charles Dickens

"Do not repine, my friends," said Mr. Pecksniff, tenderly. "Do not weep for me. It is chronic."

Read more


Charles Dickens

Every traveler has a home of his own, and he learns to appreciate it the more from his wandering.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Christmas may not bring a single thing; still, it gives me a song to sing.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Sadly, sadly, the sun rose; it rose upon no sadder sight than the man of good abilities and good emotions, incapable of their directed exercise, incapable of his own help and his own happiness, sensible...

Read more


Charles Dickens

We were equals afterwards, as we had been before; but, afterwards at quiet times when I sat looking at Joe and thinking about him, I had a new sensation of feeling conscious that I was looking up to Joe...

Read more


Charles Dickens

There have been occasions in my later life (I suppose as in most lives) when I have felt for a time as if a thick curtain had fallen on all its interest and romance, to shut me out from anything save dull...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. I was better after I had cried, than before--more sorry, more aware of...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Man cannot really improve himself without improving others.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Be guided, only by the healer of the sick, the raiser of the dead, the friend of all who were afflicted and forlorn, the patient Master who shed tears of compassion for our infirmities. We cannot but be...

Read more


Charles Dickens

And this is the eternal law. For, Evil often stops short at istelf and dies with the doer of it! but Good, never.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Are you thankful for not being young?' 'Yes, sir. If I was young, it would all have to be gone through again, and the end would be a weary way off, don't you see?...

Read more


Charles Dickens

When the time comes, let loose a tiger and a devil; but wait for the time with the tiger and the devil chained -not shown- yet always ready.

Read more


Charles Dickens

'Mind and matter,' said the lady in the wig, 'glide swift into the vortex if immensity. Howls the sublime, and softly sleeps the calm Ideal, in the whispering chambers of Imagination.'

Read more


Charles Dickens

I mean a man whose hopes and aims may sometimes lie (as most men's sometimes do, I dare say) above the ordinary level, but to whom the ordinary level will be high enough after all if it should prove to...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Good never come of such evil, a happier end was not in nature to so unhappy a beginning.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I am no more annoyed when I think of the expression, than I should be annoyed by a man's opinion of a picture of mine, who had no eye for pictures; or of a piece of music of mine, who had no ear for music.

Read more


Charles Dickens

How beautiful you are! You are more beautiful in anger than in repose. I don't ask you for your love; give me yourself and your hatred; give me yourself and that pretty rage; give me yourself and that...

Read more


Charles Dickens

There are very few moments in a man's existence when he experiences so much ludicrous distress, or meets with so little charitable commiseration, as when he is in pursuit of his own hat.

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is a pleasant world we live in, sir, a very pleasant world. There are bad people in it, Mr. Richard, but if there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Love, though said to be afflicted with blindness, is a vigilant watchman.

Read more


Charles Dickens

But the mere truth won't do. You must have a lawyer.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I will live in the past, the present, and the future. The spirits of all three shall strive within me.

Read more


Charles Dickens

From the days when it was always summer in Eden, to these days when it is mostly winter in fallen latitudes, the world of a man has invariably gone one way Charles Darnay's way the way of the love of a...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Equity sends questions to Law. Law sends questions back to equity; Law finds it can't do this, equity finds it can't do that; neither can do anything, without this solicitor instructing and this counsel...

Read more


Charles Dickens

All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretences did I cheat myself. Surely a curious thing. That I should innocently take a bad half-crown of somebody else's manufacture,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Never close your lips to those whom you have already opened your heart.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Circumstances beyond my individual control.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Oh! captive, bound, and double-ironed," cried the phantom, "not to know, that ages of incessant labour, by immortal creatures, for this earth must pass into eternity before the good of which it is susceptible...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It is no small thing, when they, who are so fresh from God, love us.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must show.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Christmas is a time in which, of all times in the year, the memory of every remediable sorrow, wrong, and trouble in the world around us, should be active with us, not less than our own experiences, for...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Come in, -- come in! and know me better, man! I am the Ghost of Christmas Present. Look upon me! You have never seen the like of me before!

Read more


Charles Dickens

A wonderful fact to reflect upon, that every human creature is constituted to be that profound secret and mystery to every other. A solemn consideration, when I enter a great city by night, that every...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Christmas a humbug, uncle!" said Scrooge's nephew. "You don't mean that, I am sure?" "I do," said Scrooge. "Merry Christmas! What right have you to be merry? what reason have you to be merry? You're poor...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Man," said the Ghost, "if man you be in heart, not adamant, forbear that wicked cant until you have discovered What the surplus is, and Where it is. Will you decide what men shall live, what men shall...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I love your daughter fondly, dearly, disinterestedly, devotedly. If ever there were love in the world, I love her.

Read more


Charles Dickens

You speak so feelingly and so manfully, Charles Darnay

Read more


Charles Dickens

Black are the brooding clouds and troubled the deep waters, when the Sea of Thought, first heaving from a calm, gives up its Dead

Read more


Charles Dickens

I don't feel any vulgar gratitude to you[for helping me]. I almost feel as if You ought to be grateful to ME, for giving you the opportunity of enjoying the luxury of generosity. . . I may have come into...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Pride is one of the seven deadly sins; but it cannot be the pride of a mother in her children, for that is a compound of two cardinal virtues - faith and hope.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I am well aware that I am the 'umblest person going. . . . My mother is likewise a very 'umble person. We live in a 'umble abode.

Read more


Charles Dickens

...and to-morrow looked in my face more steadily than I could look at it

Read more


Charles Dickens

Meow says the cat ,quack says the duck , Bow wow wow says the dog ! Grrrr!

Read more


Charles Dickens

I only know that it was, and ceased to be; and that I have written, and there I leave it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

He thought of the number of girls and women she had seen marry, how many homes with children in them she had seen grow up around her, how she had contentedly pursued her own lone quite path-for him. ~...

Read more


Charles Dickens

There was a piece of ornamental water immediately below the parapet, on the other side, into which Mr. James Harthouse had a very strong inclination to pitch Mr. Thomas Gradgrind Junior.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Sir," returned Mrs. Sparsit, " I cannot say that i have heard him precisely snore, and therefore must not make that statement. But on winter evenings, when he has fallen asleep at his table, I have heard...

Read more


Charles Dickens

She was the most wonderful woman for prowling about the house. How she got from one story to another was a mystery beyond solution. A lady so decorous in herself, and so highly connected, was not to be...

Read more


Charles Dickens

How could you give me life, and take from me all the inappreciable things that raise it from the state of conscious death? Where are the graces of my soul? Where are the sentiments of my heart? What have...

Read more


Charles Dickens

You have been so careful of me that I never had a child's heart. You have trained me so well that I never dreamed a child's dream. You have dealt so wisely with me, Father ,from my cradle to this hour,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

God bless us, every one!

Read more


Charles Dickens

Joe gave me some more gravy.

Read more


Charles Dickens

So the case stands, and under all the passion of the parties and the cries of battle lie the two chief moving causes of the struggle. Union means so many millions a year lost to the South; secession means...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Buy an annuity cheap, and make your life interesting to yourself and everybody else that watches the speculation.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Oh, a dainty plant is the ivy green, That creepeth o'er ruins old! Of right choice food are his meals, I ween, In his cell so lone and cold. Creeping where no life is seen, A rare old plant is the ivy...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Crush humanity out of shape once more, under similar hammers, and it will twist itself into the same tortured forms. Sow the same seeds of rapacious licence and oppression over again, and it will surely...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Don't be afraid! We won't make an author of you, while there's an honest trade to be learnt, or brick-making to turn to.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Did it ever strike you on such a morning as this that drowning would be happiness and peace?

Read more


Charles Dickens

He was consious of a thousand odours floating in the air, each one connected with a thousand thoughts, and hopes, and joys, and cares, long, long, forgotten.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Marley was dead, to begin with ... This must be distintly understood, or nothing wonderful can come of the story I am going to relate.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The blossom is blighted, the leaf is withered, the God of day goes down upon the dreary scene, and in short you are for ever floored.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Circumstances may accumulate so strongly even against an innocent man, that directed, sharpened, and pointed, they may slay him.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Gold, for the instant, lost its luster in his eyes, for there were countless treasures of the heart which it could never purchase

Read more


Charles Dickens

And thus ever by day and night, under the sun and under the stars, climbing the dusty hills and toiling along the weary plains, journeying by land and journeying by sea, coming and going so strangely,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I have sometimes sat alone here of an evening, listening, until I have made the echoes out to be the echoes of all the footsteps that are coming by and by into our lives. "Jerry, say that my answer was,...

Read more


Charles Dickens

If I may ride with you, Citizen Evremonde, will you let me hold your hand? I am not afraid, but I am little and weak, and it will give me more courage." As the patient eyes were lifted to his face, he...

Read more


Charles Dickens

This was my only and my constant comfort. When I think of it, the picture always rises in my mind, of a summer evening, the boys at play in the churchyard, and I sitting on my bed, reading as if for life.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I am a neat hand at cookery, and I'll tell you what I knocked up for my Christmas-eve dinner in the Library Cart. I knocked up a beefsteak-pudding for one, with two kidneys, a dozen oysters, and a couple...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Think now and then that there is a man who would give his life, to keep a life you love beside you.

Read more


Charles Dickens

The bearings of this observation lays in the application of it.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Philosophers are only men in armor after all.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see triumph.

Read more


Charles Dickens

... the woman who grows up with the idea that she is simply to be an amiable animal, to be caressed and coaxed, is invariably a bitterly disappointed woman. A game of chess will cure such a conceit forever....

Read more


Charles Dickens

The persons on whom I have bestowed my dearest love lie deep in their graves; but, although the happiness and delight of my life lie buried there too, I have not made a coffin of my heart, and sealed it...

Read more


Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Novelties please less than they impress.

Read more


Charles Dickens

. . . in seclusion, she had secluded herself from a thousand natural and healing influences; that, her mind, brooding solitary, had grown diseased, as all minds do and must and will that reverse the appointed...

Read more


Charles Dickens

I do not know the American gentleman, God forgive me for putting two such words together.

Read more


Charles Dickens

There either is or is not, that’s the way things are. The colour of the day. The way it felt to be a child. The saltwater on your sunburnt legs. Sometimes the water is yellow, sometimes it’s red. But...

Read more


Charles Dickens

People like us don't go out at night cause people like them see us for what we are

Read more


Charles Dickens

Do the wise thing and the kind thing too, and make the best of us and not the worst.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Do all the good you can and make as little fuss about it as possible.

Read more


Charles Dickens

While the flowers, pale and unreal in the moonlight, floated away upon the river; and thus do greater things that once were in our breasts, and near our hearts, flow from us to the eternal sea.

Read more


Charles Dickens

No varnish can hide the grain of the wood; and that the more varnish you put on, the more the grain will express itself.

Read more


Charles Dickens

Mr. Cruncher... always spoke of the year of our Lord as Anna Dominoes: apparently under the impression that the Christian era dated from the invention of a popular game, by a lady who had bestowed her...

Read more


Charles Dickens

Bleak, dark, and piercing cold, it was a night for the well-housed and fed to draw round the bright fire, and thank God they were at home; and for the homeless starving wretch to lay him down and die....

Read more


Charles Dickens

I could settle down into a state of equable low spirits, and resign myself to coffee.

Read more


Charles Dickens

She had curiously thoughtful and attentive eyes; eyes that were very pretty and very good.

Read more


Charles Dickens

I never had one hour's happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.

Read more


Charles Dickens

To see the butcher slap the steak before he laid it on the block, and give his knife a sharpening, was to forget breakfast instantly. It was agreeable too - it really was - to see him cut it off so smooth...

Read more


Charles Dickens

All knives and forks were working away at a rate that was quite alarming; very few words were spoken; and everybody seemed to eat his utmost, in self defence, as if a famine were expected to set in before...

Read more


Charles Dickens

And could I look upon her without compassion, seeing her punishment in the ruin she was, in her profound unfitness for this earth on which she was placed, in the vanity of sorrow which had become a master...

Read more


“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss