Jane Austen

Born: December 16, 1775

Die: July 18, 1817

Occupation: Novelist

Quotes of Jane Austen

Jane Austen

I have no more to say. If this be the case, he deserves you. I could not have parted with you, my Lizzy, to any one less worthy.

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Jane Austen

She went, however, and they sauntered about together many a half hour in Mr. Grant's shrubbery, the weather being unusually mild for the time of year, and venturing sometimes even to sit down on one of...

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Jane Austen

When I fall in love, it will be forever.

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Jane Austen

The advantages of natural folly in a beautiful girl have been already set forth by the capital pen of a sister author; and to her treatment of the subject I will only add, in justice to men, that though...

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Jane Austen

You must really begin to harden yourself to the idea of being worth looking at.

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Jane Austen

I cannot comprehend the neglect of a family library in such days as these." - Mr. Darcy

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Jane Austen

I have been used to consider poetry as "the food of love" said Darcy. "Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination,...

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Jane Austen

One word from you shall silence me forever.

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Jane Austen

A natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.

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Jane Austen

Oh! you are a great deal too apt, you know, to like people in general. You never see fault in any body. All the world are good and agreeable in your eyes. I never heard you speak ill of a human being in...

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Jane Austen

Everybody likes to go their own way–to choose their own time and manner of devotion.

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Jane Austen

Now they were as strangers; nay worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted.

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Jane Austen

Good apple pies are a considerable part of our domestic happiness.

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Jane Austen

Nobody could catch cold by the sea; nobody wanted appetite by the sea; nobody wanted spirits; nobody wanted strength. Sea air was healing, softening, relaxing - fortifying and bracing - seemingly just...

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Jane Austen

She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in any thing ridiculous.

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Jane Austen

It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us. Women fancy admiration means more than it does. And men take care that they should.

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Jane Austen

One can never have too large a party.

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Jane Austen

Is not poetry the food of love?

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Jane Austen

And have you never known the pleasure and triumph of a lucky guess? I pity you. I thought you cleverer; for depend upon it, a lucky guess is never merely luck. There is always some talent in it.

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Jane Austen

But remember that the pain of parting from friends will be felt by everybody at times, whatever be their education or state. Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience; or give it a more fascinating...

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Jane Austen

I do not think I ever opened a book in my life which had not something to say upon woman's inconstancy. Songs and proverbs, all talk of woman's fickleness. But perhaps you will say, these were all written...

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Jane Austen

She attracted him more than he liked.

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Jane Austen

Her eye fell everywhere on lawns and plantations of the freshest green; and the trees, though not fully clothed, were in that delightful state when farther beauty is known to be at hand, and when, while...

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Jane Austen

I should infinitely prefer a book...

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Jane Austen

The truth is, that in London it is always a sickly season. Nobody is healthy in London, nobody can be.

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Jane Austen

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering...

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Jane Austen

Nothing amuses me more than the easy manner with which everybody settles the abundance of those who have a great deal less than themselves.

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Jane Austen

There are as many forms of love as there are moments in time.

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Jane Austen

... But he recommended the books which charmed her leisure hours, he encouraged her taste, and corrected her judgment; he made reading useful by talking to her of what she read, and heightened its attraction...

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Jane Austen

There is no reason in the world why you should not be important where you are known. You have good sense, and a sweet temper, and I am sure you have a grateful heart, that could never receive kindness...

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Jane Austen

Laugh as much as you choose, but you will not laugh me out of my opinion.

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Jane Austen

I love you. Most ardently.

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Jane Austen

My fingers,' said Elizabeth, 'do not move over this instrument in the masterly manner which I see so many woman's do. They have not the same force of rapidity and do not possess the same expression. But...

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Jane Austen

Men were put into the world to teach women the law of compromise.

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Jane Austen

Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.

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Jane Austen

There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.

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Jane Austen

Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.

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Jane Austen

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves; vanity, to what we would have...

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Jane Austen

The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.

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Jane Austen

My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.

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Jane Austen

There are people, who the more you do for them, the less they will do for themselves.

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Jane Austen

There is no charm equal to tenderness of heart.

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Jane Austen

Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility. It is often only carelessness of opinion, and sometimes an indirect boast.

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Jane Austen

A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.

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Jane Austen

A lady's imagination is very rapid; it jumps from admiration to love, from love to matrimony in a moment.

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Jane Austen

A woman, especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.

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Jane Austen

I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.

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Jane Austen

Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings.

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Jane Austen

The more I know of the world, the more I am convinced that I shall never see a man whom I can really love.

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Jane Austen

An engaged woman is always more agreeable than a disengaged. She is satisfied with herself. Her cares are over, and she feels that she may exert all her powers of pleasing without suspicion. All is safe...

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Jane Austen

If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more.

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Jane Austen

Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.

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Jane Austen

To sit in the shade on a fine day and look upon verdure is the most perfect refreshment.

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Jane Austen

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.

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Jane Austen

To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love.

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Jane Austen

For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors and laugh at them in our turn?

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Jane Austen

Oh! do not attack me with your watch. A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch.

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Jane Austen

We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.

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Jane Austen

To flatter and follow others, without being flattered and followed in turn, is but a state of half enjoyment.

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Jane Austen

It is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy. May I ask whether these pleasing attentions proceed from the impulse of the moment, or are they the result of previous study?

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Jane Austen

A person who can write a long letter with ease, cannot write ill.

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Jane Austen

Every man is surrounded by a neighborhood of voluntary spies.

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Jane Austen

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.

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Jane Austen

It sometimes happens that a woman is handsomer at twenty-nine than she was ten years before.

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Jane Austen

In nine cases out of ten, a woman had better show more affection than she feels.

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Jane Austen

Good-humoured, unaffected girls, will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women. They are two distinct orders of being.

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Jane Austen

Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed in love a little now and then.

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Jane Austen

No man is offended by another man's admiration of the woman he loves; it is the woman only who can make it a torment.

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Jane Austen

How quick come the reasons for approving what we like!

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Jane Austen

A mind lively and at ease, can do with seeing nothing, and can see nothing that does not answer.

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Jane Austen

Surprises are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.

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Jane Austen

One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.

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Jane Austen

One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.

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Jane Austen

I am afraid that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.

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Jane Austen

If things are going untowardly one month, they are sure to mend the next.

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Jane Austen

Those who do not complain are never pitied.

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Jane Austen

We do not look in our great cities for our best morality.

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Jane Austen

Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or...

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Jane Austen

I have been a selfish being all my life, in practice, though not in principle.

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Jane Austen

Respect for right conduct is felt by every body.

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Jane Austen

What is right to be done cannot be done too soon.

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Jane Austen

It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.

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Jane Austen

One cannot be always laughing at a man without now and then stumbling on something witty.

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Jane Austen

There is something so amiable in the prejudices of a young mind, that one is sorry to see them give way to the reception of more general opinions.

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Jane Austen

Business, you know, may bring you money, but friendship hardly ever does.

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Jane Austen

Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery.

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Jane Austen

One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless it has been all suffering, nothing but suffering.

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Jane Austen

I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible.

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Jane Austen

One man's style must not be the rule of another's.

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Jane Austen

Vanity working on a weak head, produces every sort of mischief.

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Jane Austen

Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor. Which is one very strong argument in favor of matrimony.

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Jane Austen

There are certainly not so many men of large fortune in the world, as there are pretty women to deserve them.

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Jane Austen

Where an opinion is general, it is usually correct.

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Jane Austen

Husbands and wives generally understand when opposition will be vain.

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Jane Austen

It is always incomprehensible to a man that a woman should ever refuse an offer of marriage.

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Jane Austen

Nobody minds having what is too good for them.

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Jane Austen

What wild imaginations one forms where dear self is concerned! How sure to be mistaken!

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Jane Austen

Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken.

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Jane Austen

Dress is at all times a frivolous distinction, and excessive solicitude about it often destroys its own aim.

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Jane Austen

They are much to be pitied who have not been given a taste for nature early in life.

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Jane Austen

To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain for the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.

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Jane Austen

Where youth and diffidence are united, it requires uncommon steadiness of reason to resist the attraction of being called the most charming girl in the world.

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Jane Austen

Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree; the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.

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Jane Austen

Human nature is so well disposed towards those who are in interesting situations, that a young person, who either marries or dies, is sure of being kindly spoken of.

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Jane Austen

It is this delightful habit of journalizing which largely contributes to form the easy style of writing for which ladies are so generally celebrated. Every body allows that the talent of writing is particularly...

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Jane Austen

Self-knowledge is the first step to maturity.

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Jane Austen

How little of permanent happiness could belong to a couple who were only brought together because their passions were stronger than their virtue.

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Jane Austen

If a woman conceals her affection with the same skill from the object of it, she may lose the opportunity of fixing him; and it will then be but poor consolation to believe the world equally in the dark....

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Jane Austen

Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly.

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Jane Austen

You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever. I offer myself to you again with a heart even more your own than when you...

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Jane Austen

But indeed I would rather have nothing but tea.

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Jane Austen

She began now to comprehend that he was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes. It...

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Jane Austen

You expect me to account for opinions which you choose to call mine, but which I have never acknowledged.

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Jane Austen

This is an evening of wonders, indeed!

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Jane Austen

There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always do if he chooses, and that is his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution. - Mr. Knightley

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Jane Austen

He then departed, to make himself still more interesting, in the midst of a heavy rain.

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Jane Austen

A person who is knowingly bent on bad behavior, gets upset when better behavior is expected of them.

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Jane Austen

she thought it was the misfortune of poetry, to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly, were the very feelings which...

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Jane Austen

There is a quickness of perception in some, a nicety in the discernment of character, a natural penetration, in short, which no experience in others can equal...

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Jane Austen

The power of doing any thing with quickness is always much prized by the possessor, and often without any attention to the imperfection of the performance. - Mr Darcy

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Jane Austen

Pray, pray be composed, and do not betray what you feel to every body present

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Jane Austen

I hate to hear you talk about all women as if they were fine ladies instead of rational creatures. None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.

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Jane Austen

He was not an ill-disposed young man, unless to be rather cold hearted, and rather selfish, is to be ill-disposed....

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Jane Austen

Were I to fall in love, indeed, it would be a different thing; but I have never been in love ; it is not my way, or my nature; and I do not think I ever shall.

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Jane Austen

Where the heart is really attached, I know very well how little one can be pleased with the attention of any body else.

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Jane Austen

if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him. If she can hesitate as to `Yes,' she ought to say `No' directly. It is not a state to be safely entered...

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Jane Austen

With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works.

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Jane Austen

Nothing is more deceitful than the appearance of humility.

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Jane Austen

There is nothing like employment, active indispensable employment, for relieving sorrow. Employment, even melancholy, may dispel melancholy.

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Jane Austen

If there is any thing disagreeable going on, men are always sure to get out of it.

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Jane Austen

The Very first moment I beheld him, my heart was irrevocably gone.

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Jane Austen

What do you know of my heart? What do you know of anything but your own suffering?

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Jane Austen

I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man.

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Jane Austen

He may live in my memory as the most amiable man of my acquaintance..

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Jane Austen

In a letter from Bath to her sister, Cassandra, one senses her frustration at her sheltered existence, Tuesday, 12 May 1801. Another stupid party . . . with six people to look on, and talk nonsense to...

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Jane Austen

I am fond of history and am very well contented to take the false with the true. In the principal facts they have sources of intelligence in former histories and records, which may be as much depended...

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Jane Austen

Such squeamish youths as cannot bear to be connected with a little absurdity are not worth a regret.

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Jane Austen

I pay very little regard...to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person.

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Jane Austen

I might as well enquire,” replied she, “why with so evident a design of offending and insulting me, you chose to tell me that you liked me against your will, against your reason, and even against your...

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Jane Austen

I have changed my mind, and changed the trimmings of my cap this morning; they are now such as you suggested.

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Jane Austen

If this man had not twelve thousand a year, he would be a very stupid fellow.

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Jane Austen

but a sanguine temper, though for ever expecting more good than occurs, does not always pay for its hopes by any proportionate depression. it soon flies over the present failure, and begins to hope again.

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Jane Austen

I do assure you, Sir, that I have no pretension whatever of that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man. I would rather be paid the compliment of being believed sincere. I thank...

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Jane Austen

To her own heart it was a delightful affair, to her imagination it was even a ridiculous one, but to her reason, her judgment, it was completely a puzzle.

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Jane Austen

It isn't what we say or think that defines us, but what we do.

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Jane Austen

I certainly have not the talent which some people possess," said Darcy, "of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their...

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Jane Austen

Well, my dear," said Mr. Bennet, when Elizabeth had read the note aloud, "if your daughter should have a dangerous fit of illness—if she should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit...

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Jane Austen

Till this moment I never knew myself.

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Jane Austen

It was not in her nature, however, to increase her vexations by dwelling on them. She was confident of having performed her duty, and to fret over unavoidable evils, or augment them by anxiety, was not...

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Jane Austen

Wisdom is better than wit, and in the long run will certainly have the laugh on her side.

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Jane Austen

An artist cannot do anything slovenly.

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Jane Austen

My sore throats are always worse than anyone's.

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Jane Austen

Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left.

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Jane Austen

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading!

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Jane Austen

I do not like to have people throw themselves away; but everybody should marry as soon as they can do it to advantage.

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Jane Austen

One has not great hopes from Birmingham. I always say there is something direful in the sound.

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Jane Austen

I mean to be too rich to lament or to feel anything of the sort. A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of. It certainly may secure all the myrtle and turkey part of it.

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Jane Austen

A lucky guess is never merely luck. There is always some talent in it.

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Jane Austen

Then it would not be so strong a sense. If it failed to produce equal exertion, it could not be an equal conviction.

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Jane Austen

Fine dancing, I believe like virtue, must be its own reward. Those who are standing by are usually thinking of something very different.

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Jane Austen

There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. My courage always rises at every attempt to intimidate me.

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Jane Austen

The evergreen! How beautiful, how welcome, how wonderful the evergreen! When one thinks of it, how astonishing a variety of nature! In some countries we know that the tree that sheds its leaf is the...

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Jane Austen

And now I may dismiss my heroine to the sleepless couch, which is the true heroine's portion - to a pillow strewed with thorns and wet with tears. And lucky may she think herself, if she get another good...

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Jane Austen

But Catherine did not know her own advantages - did not know that a good-looking girl, with an affectionate heart and a very ignorant mind, cannot fail of attracting a clever young man, unless circumstances...

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Jane Austen

Where people are really attached, poverty itself is wealth.

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Jane Austen

She had a lively, playful disposition that delighted in anything ridiculous.

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Jane Austen

Where a man does his best with only moderate powers, he will have the advantage over negligent superiority.

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Jane Austen

You are too generous to trifle with me. If your feelings are still what they were last April, tell me so at once. My affections and wishes are unchanged; but one word from you will silence me on this subject...

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Jane Austen

Yes, you know enough of my frankness to believe me capable of that. After abusing you so abominably to your face, I could have no scruple in abusing you to all your relations.” -Elizabeth Bennet

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Jane Austen

If you will thank me '' he replied let it be for yourself alone. That the wish of giving happiness to you might add force to the other inducements which led me on I shall not attempt to deny. But your...

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Jane Austen

Indulge your imagination in every possible flight.

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Jane Austen

Mrs. Jennings was a widow, with an ample jointure. She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest of...

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Jane Austen

When once married people begin to attack me with, 'Oh! you will think very differently, when you are married,' I can only say, 'No I shall not'; and then they say again, 'Yes you will,' and there is an...

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Jane Austen

I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seen through I am afraid is pitiful.

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Jane Austen

In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided among the sexes.

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Jane Austen

Everybody's heart is open, you know, when they have recently escaped from severe pain, or are recovering the blessing of health.

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Jane Austen

Anne hoped she had outlived the age of blushing; but the age of emotion she certainly had not.

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Jane Austen

Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste it's fragrance on the desert air.

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Jane Austen

The evening ended with dancing. On its being proposed, Anne offered her services, as usual, and though her eyes would sometimes fill with tears as she sat at the instrument, she was extremely glad to be...

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Jane Austen

Teach us...... that we may feel the importance of every day, of every hour, as it passes.

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Jane Austen

Now I must give one smirk and then we may be rational again

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Jane Austen

The most incomprehensible thing in the world to a man, is a woman who rejects his offer of marriage!

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Jane Austen

To yield readily--easily--to the persuasion of a friend is no merit.... To yield without conviction is no compliment to the understanding of either.

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Jane Austen

one day in the country is exactly like another.

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Jane Austen

We live at home, quiet, confined, and our feelings prey upon us.

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Jane Austen

Know your own happiness.

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Jane Austen

And you are never to stir out of doors till you can prove that you have spent ten minutes of every day in a rational manner.

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Jane Austen

I do not find it easy to talk to people I don't know.

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Jane Austen

Here I have opportunity enough for the exercise of my talent, as the chief of my time is spent in conversation.

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Jane Austen

It was absolutely necessary to interrupt him now.

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Jane Austen

She was heartily ashamed of her ignorance - a misplaced shame. Where people wish to attach, they should always be ignorant. To come with a well−informed mind is to come with an inability of administering...

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Jane Austen

Maybe it’s that I find it hard to forgive the follies and vices of others, or their offenses against me. My good opinion, once lost, is lost forever.

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Jane Austen

Let other pens dwell on guilt and misery. I quit such odious subjects as soon as I can, impatient to restore everybody not greatly in fault themselves to tolerable comfort, and to have done with all the...

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Jane Austen

But people themselves alter so much, that there is something new to be observed in them for ever.

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Jane Austen

Trusting that you will some time or other do me greater justice than you can do now.

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Jane Austen

Let us have the luxury of silence.

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Jane Austen

Almost anything is possible with time

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Jane Austen

An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see...

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Jane Austen

The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke.

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Jane Austen

They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance, that it was impossible to avoid his sight. Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest...

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Jane Austen

Where shall we see a better daughter, or a kinder sister, or a truer friend?

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Jane Austen

You think me foolish to call instruction a torment, but if you had been as much used as myself to hear poor little children first learning their letters and then learning to spell, if you had ever seen...

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Jane Austen

I leave it to be settled, by whomsoever it may concern, whether the tendency of this work be altogether to recommend parental tyranny, or reward filial disobedience.

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Jane Austen

Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.

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Jane Austen

To begin perfect happiness at the respective ages of 26 and 18 is to do pretty well

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Jane Austen

A mother would have been always present. A mother would have been a constant friend; her influence would have been beyond all other.

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Jane Austen

Catherine had never wanted comfort more, and [Henry] looked as if he was aware of it.

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Jane Austen

What praise is more valuable than the praise of an intelligent servant?

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Jane Austen

Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make her feelings appear what they were not. It was necessary to laugh, when she would rather have cried.

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Jane Austen

Not very good, I am afraid. But now really, do not you think Udolpho the nicest book in the world?" "The nicest—by which I suppose you mean the neatest. That must depend upon the binding.

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Jane Austen

I am sure," cried Catherine, "I did not mean to say anything wrong; but it is a nice book, and why should not I call it so?" "Very true," said Henry, "and this is a very nice day, and we are taking a very...

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Jane Austen

Oh! Single, my dear, to be sure! A single man of large fortune; four or five thousand a year. What a fine thing for our girls!

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Jane Austen

[W]here other powers of entertainment are wanting, the true philosopher will derive benefit from such as are given.

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Jane Austen

Oh!” said she, “I heard you before, but I could not immediately determine what to say in reply. You wanted me, I know, to say ‘Yes,’ that you might have the pleasure of despising my taste; but...

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Jane Austen

She was nothing more than a mere good-tempered, civil and obliging Young Woman; as such we could scarcely dislike her -- she was only an Object of Contempt

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Jane Austen

I will only add, God bless you.

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Jane Austen

If gratitude and esteem are good foundations of affection, Elizabeth's change of sentiment will be neither improbable nor faulty. But if otherwise--if regard springing from such sources is unreasonable...

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Jane Austen

Children of the same family, the same blood, with the same first associations and habits, have some means of enjoyment in their power, which no subsequent connections can supply...

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Jane Austen

Her companion's discourse now sunk from its hitherto animated pitch, to nothing more than a short, decisive sentence of praise or condemnation on the face of every woman they met; and Catherine, after...

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Jane Austen

We must consider what Miss. Fairfax quits, before we condemn her taste for what she goes to.

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Jane Austen

The less said the better.

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Jane Austen

Is there not something wanted, Miss Price, in our language - a something between compliments and - and love - to suit the sort of friendly acquaintance we have had together?

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Jane Austen

It is very difficult for the prosperous to be humble.

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Jane Austen

Brandon is just the kind of man whom every body speaks well of, and nobody cares about; whom all are delighted to see, and nobody remembers to talk to.

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Jane Austen

Sense will always have attractions for me.

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Jane Austen

If a woman is partial to a man, and does not endeavour to conceal it, he must find it out." -Elizabeth

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Jane Austen

...when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure.

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Jane Austen

It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury...

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Jane Austen

If adventures will not befall a young lady in her own village, she must seek them abroad.

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Jane Austen

Upon the whole, therefore, she found, what has been sometimes found before, that an event to which she had looked forward with impatient desire, did not in taking place, bring all the satisfaction she...

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Jane Austen

It is very unfair to judge any body's conduct, without an intimate knowledge of their situation.

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Jane Austen

Whom are you going to dance with?' asked Mr. Knightley. She hesitated a moment and then replied, 'With you, if you will ask me.' Will you?' said he, offering his hand. Indeed I will. You have shown that...

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Jane Austen

It is not every man's fate to marry the woman who loves him best

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Jane Austen

I certainly will not persuade myself to feel more than I do. I am quite enough in love. I should be sorry to be more

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Jane Austen

Evil to some is always good to others

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Jane Austen

Ah, mother! How do you do?' said he, giving her a hearty shake of the hand; 'Where did you get that quiz of a hat? It makes you look like an old witch...' On his two younger sisters he then bestowed an...

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Jane Austen

I have no talent for certainty.

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Jane Austen

The worst crimes; are the crimes of the heart

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Jane Austen

And we mean to treat you all,' added Lydia, 'but you must lend us the money, for we have just spent ours at the shop out there.

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Jane Austen

Have you any other objection than your belief of my indifference?" - Elizabeth Bennet

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Jane Austen

What one means one day, you know, one may not mean the next. Circumstances change, opinions alter.

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Jane Austen

Another stupid party . . . with six people to look on, and talk nonsense to each other.

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Jane Austen

My style of writing is very diffrent from yours.

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Jane Austen

Her heart did whisper that he had done it for her.

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Jane Austen

She had nothing to wish otherwise, but that the days did not pass so swiftly. It was a delightful visit;-perfect, in being much too short.

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Jane Austen

I wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!- Elizabeth Bennet

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Jane Austen

Eleanor went to her room "where she was free to think and be wretched.

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Jane Austen

To you I shall say, as I have often said before, Do not be in a hurry, the right man will come at last...

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Jane Austen

She was feeling, thinking, trembling about everything; agitated, happy, miserable, infinitely obliged, absolutely angry.

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Jane Austen

I read it [history] a little as a duty, but it tells me nothing that does not either vex or weary me. The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars or pestilences, in every page; the men all so good for nothing,...

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Jane Austen

One cannot know what a man really is by the end of a fortnight.

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Jane Austen

A very narrow income has a tendency to contract the mind, and sour the temper. Those who can barely live, and who live perforce in a very small, and generally very inferior, society, may well be illiberal...

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Jane Austen

Have a little compassion on my nerves. You tear them to pieces.

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Jane Austen

Which of all my important nothings shall I tell you first?

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Jane Austen

To love is to burn, to be on fire.

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Jane Austen

I am not romantic, you know; I never was.

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Jane Austen

The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it.

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Jane Austen

Incline us oh God! to think humbly of ourselves, to be severe only in the examination of our own conduct, to consider our fellow-creatures with kindness, and to judge of all they say and do with that charity...

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Jane Austen

All the world is good and agreeable in your eyes.

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Jane Austen

Her family had of late been exceedingly fluctuating. For many years of her life she had had two sons; but the crime and annihilation of Edward a few weeks ago, had robbed her of one; the similar annihilation...

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Jane Austen

Know your own happiness. You want nothing but patience- or give it a more fascinating name, call it hope.

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Jane Austen

I am certainly the most fortunate creature ever existed!

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Jane Austen

A man always imagines a woman to be ready for anybody who asks her.

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Jane Austen

I do not find myself making any use of the word sacrifice.

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Jane Austen

I do suspect that he is not really necessary to my happiness.

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Jane Austen

His feelings are warm, but I can imagine them rather changeable.

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Jane Austen

Did not you? I did for you. But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never.

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Jane Austen

To be sure you know no actual good of me, but nobody thinks of that when they fall in love.

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Jane Austen

Time, time will heal the wound.

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Jane Austen

Oh! I am delighted with the book! I should like to spend my whole life in reading it.

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Jane Austen

never could I expect to be so truly beloved and important; so always first and always right in any man's eyes as I am in my father's...

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Jane Austen

It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives us.

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Jane Austen

I am sure of this, that if everybody was to drink their bottle a day, there would be not half the disorders in the world there are now. It would be a famous good thing for us all.

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Jane Austen

Her own thoughts and reflections were habitually her best companions.

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Jane Austen

Those who have not more must be satisfied with what they have.

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Jane Austen

My heart is, and always will be, yours.

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Jane Austen

How much I love every thing that is decided and open!

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Jane Austen

Yet there it was not love. It was a little fever of admiration; but it might, probably must, end in love with some

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Jane Austen

She knew that when she played she was giving pleasure only to herself; but this was no new sensation

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Jane Austen

I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him.

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Jane Austen

You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you. -Mr. Darcy

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Jane Austen

One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy.

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Jane Austen

When I look out on such a night as this, I feel as if there could be neither wickedness nor sorrow in the world; and there certainly would be less of both if the sublimity of Nature were more attended...

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Jane Austen

There is not the hundredth part of the wine consumed in this kingdom that there ought to be. Our foggy climate wants help.

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Jane Austen

The sooner every party breaks up the better.

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Jane Austen

Mr. Bennet's expectations were fully answered. His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened to him with the keenest enjoyment.

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Jane Austen

It was, perhaps, one of those cases in which advice is good or bad only as the event decides.

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Jane Austen

Such a letter was not to be soon recovered from. . . . Every moment rather brought fresh agitation. It was an overpowering happiness.

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Jane Austen

Perfect happiness, even in memory, is not common.

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Jane Austen

No- I cannot talk of books in a ballroom; my head is always full of something else.

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Jane Austen

It would be most right, and most wise, and, therefore must involve least suffering.

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Jane Austen

Beware how you give your heart.

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Jane Austen

She would have liked to know how he felt as to a meeting. Perhaps indifferent, if indifference could exist under such circumstances. He must be either indifferent or unwilling. Has he wished ever to see...

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Jane Austen

His cold politeness, his ceremonious grace, were worse than anything.

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Jane Austen

She understood him. He could not forgive her,-but he could not be unfeeling. Though condemning her for the past, and considering it with high and unjest resentment, though perfectly careless of her, and...

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Jane Austen

The last few hours were certainly very painful," replied Anne: "but when pain is over, the remembrance of it often becomes a pleasure. One does not love a place the less for having suffered in it, unless...

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Jane Austen

We certainly do not forget you, so soon as you forget us. It is, perhaps, our fate rather than our merit. We cannot help ourselves.

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Jane Austen

Thus much indeed he was obliged to acknowledge - that he had been constant unconsciously, nay unintentionally; that he had meant to forget her, and believed it to be done. He had imagined himself indifferent,...

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Jane Austen

There, he had seen every thing to exalt in his estimation the woman he had lost, and there begun to deplore the pride, the folly, the madness of resentment, which had kept him from trying to regain her...

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Jane Austen

They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.

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Jane Austen

She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.

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Jane Austen

Upon the whole, therefore, she found what had been sometimes found before, that an event to which she had looked forward with impatient desire, did not, in taking place, bring all the satisfaction she...

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Jane Austen

There are secrets in all families.

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Jane Austen

The more I see of the world, the more am i dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistencies of all human.

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Jane Austen

Do you talk by rule, then, while you are dancing?" Sometimes. One must speak a little, you know. It would look odd to be entirely silent for half an hour together, and yet for the advantage of some, conversation...

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Jane Austen

Do not consider me now as an elegant female intending to plague you, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart.

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Jane Austen

It was a gloomy prospect, and all that she could do was to throw a mist over it, and hope when the mist cleared away, she should see something else.

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Jane Austen

Oh! write, write. Finish it at once. Let there be an end of this suspense. Fix, commit, condemn yourself.

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Jane Austen

I do not know whether it ought to be so, but certainly silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way. Wickedness is always wickedness, but folly is not always...

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Jane Austen

She was happy, she knew she was happy, and knew she ought to be happy.

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Jane Austen

Nay," cried Bingley, "this is too much, to remember at night all the foolish things that were said in the morning.

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Jane Austen

We must not be so ready to fancy ourselves intentionally injured. We must not expect a lively young man to be always so guarded and circumspect. It is very often nothing but our own vanity that deceives...

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Jane Austen

And to all this she must yet add something more substantial, in the improvement of her mind by extensive reading.

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Jane Austen

Do you dance, Mr. Darcy?" Darcy: "Not if I can help it!" Sir William: "What a charming amusement for young people this is, Mr. Darcy! There is nothing like dancing, after all. I consider it as one of the...

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Jane Austen

Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride - where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.

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Jane Austen

How much sooner one tires of anything than of a book!

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Jane Austen

Pride is a very common failing, I believe. By all that I have ever read, I am convinced that it is very common indeed, that human nature is particularly prone to it, and that there are very few of us who...

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Jane Austen

Mr. Darcy began to feel the danger of paying Elizabeth too much attention.

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Jane Austen

Not keep a journal! How are your absent cousins to understand the tenor of your life in Bath without one? How are the civilities and compliments of every day to be related as they ought to be, unless noted...

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Jane Austen

I will not say that your mulberry trees are dead; but I am afraid they're not alive.

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Jane Austen

I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness ... Shyness is only the effect of a sense of inferiority in some way or...

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Jane Austen

Had I not been bound to silence I could have provided proof enough of a broken heart, even for you.

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Jane Austen

And if I had not a letter to write myself, I might sit by you and admire the evenness of your writing, as another young lady once did. But I have an aunt too, who must not be longer neglected.

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Jane Austen

If any young men come for Mary or Kitty, send them in, for I am quite as leisure.

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Jane Austen

But if I were you, I would stand by the nephew. He has more to give.

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Jane Austen

You have delighted us long enough.

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Jane Austen

I can never be important to any one.' 'What is to prevent you?' 'Every thing — my situation — my foolishness and awkwardness.

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Jane Austen

…but then I am unlike other people I dare say.

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Jane Austen

She wished such words unsaid with all her heart

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Jane Austen

But it is very foolish to ask questions about any young ladies — about any three sisters just grown up; for one knows, without being told, exactly what they are — all very accomplished and pleasing,...

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Jane Austen

Her mind was all disorder. The past, present, future, every thing was terrible.

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Jane Austen

Sitting with her on Sunday evening — a wet Sunday evening — the very time of all others when if a friend is at hand the heart must be opened, and every thing told…

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Jane Austen

You men have none of you any hearts.' 'If we have not hearts, we have eyes; and they give us torment enough.

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Jane Austen

The mere habit of learning to love is the thing; and a teachableness of disposition in a young lady is a great blessing

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Jane Austen

…she had nothing to do but to forgive herself and be happier than ever…

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Jane Austen

…each found her greatest safety in silence…

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Jane Austen

...but there are some situations of the human mind in which good sense has very little power...

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Jane Austen

He had an affectionate heart. He must love somebody.

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Jane Austen

…one half of her should not be always so much wiser than the other half…

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Jane Austen

A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself.

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Jane Austen

…she felt depressed beyond any thing she had ever known before.

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Jane Austen

Well, my comfort is, I am sure Jane will die of a broken heart, and then he will be sorry for what he has done.

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Jane Austen

How hard it is in some cases to be believed!' 'And how impossible in others!

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Jane Austen

I am happier than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh. Mr. Darcy sends you all the love in the world, that he can spare from me.

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Jane Austen

She was without any power, because she was without any desire of command over herself.

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Jane Austen

You have no ambition, I well know. Your wishes are all moderate.' 'As moderate as those of the rest of the world, I believe. I wish as well as every body else to be perfectly happy, but like every body...

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Jane Austen

Marianne was silent; it was impossible for her to say what she did not feel, however trivial the occasion…

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Jane Austen

She was stronger alone…

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Jane Austen

But to appear happy when I am so miserable — Oh! who can require it?

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Jane Austen

From a night of more sleep than she had expected, Marianne awoke the next morning to the same consciousness of misery in which she had closed her eyes.

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Jane Austen

…told herself likewise not to hope. But it was too late. Hope had already entered…

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Jane Austen

I think I may boast myself to be, with all possible vanity, the most unlearned and uninformed female who ever dared to be an authoress.

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Jane Austen

Why not seize the pleasure at once? -- How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!

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Jane Austen

Elinor was to be the comforter of others in her own distresses, no less than in theirs; and all the comfort that could be given by assurances of her own composure of mind, and a very earnest vindication...

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Jane Austen

A Woman never looks better than on horseback

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Jane Austen

But to live in ignorance on such a point was impossible.

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Jane Austen

My good opinion once lost is lost forever.

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Jane Austen

There is a monsterous deal of stupid quizzing, & common-place nonsense talked, but scarcely any wit.

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Jane Austen

Sometimes one is guided by what they say of themselves, and very frequently by what other people say of them, without giving oneself time to deliberate and judge." -Elinor Dashwood

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Jane Austen

I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness." -Edward Ferrars

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Jane Austen

My dear Mr. Bennet," said his lady to him one day, "have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?

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Jane Austen

Books--oh! no. I am sure we never read the same, or not with the same feelings." "I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be no want of subject. We may compare our different...

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Jane Austen

my courage always rises with every attempt to intimidate me.

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Jane Austen

I could not be happy with a man whose taste did not in every point coincide with my own. He must enter in all my feelings; the same books, the same music must charm us both.

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Jane Austen

How clever you are, to know something of which you are ignorant.

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Jane Austen

Catherine hoped at least to pass uncensured through the crowd. As for admiration, it was always very welcome when it came, but she did not depend on it.

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Jane Austen

Are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?

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Jane Austen

I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness.

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Jane Austen

Mr. Knightley seemed to be trying not to smile; and succeeded without difficulty, upon Mrs. Elton's beginning to talk to him.

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Jane Austen

It's such a happiness when good people get together.

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Jane Austen

Success supposes endeavour.

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Jane Austen

When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable If I have not an excellent library.

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Jane Austen

None but a woman can teach the science of herself.

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Jane Austen

Fanny! You are killing me!" "No man dies of love but on the stage, Mr. Crawford.

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Jane Austen

I understand Crawford paid you a visit?" "Yes." "And was he attentive?" "Yes, very." "And has your heart changed towards him?" "Yes. Several times. I have - I find that I - I find that-" "Shh. Surely you...

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Jane Austen

She was one of those, who, having, once begun, would be always in love.

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Jane Austen

Where the wound had been given, there must the cure be found, if any where.

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Jane Austen

It is indolence... Indolence and love of ease; a want of all laudable ambition, of taste for good company, or of inclination to take the trouble of being agreeable, which make men clergymen. A clergyman...

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Jane Austen

I have frequently detected myself in such kind of mistakes... in a total misapprehension of character at some point or other: fancying people so much more gay or grave, or ingenious or stupid than they...

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Jane Austen

There could have been no two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison

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Jane Austen

Next to being married, a girl likes to be crossed in love a little now and then. It is something to think of, and gives her a sort of distinction among her companions

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Jane Austen

You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more...

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Jane Austen

I do not cough for my own amusement.

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Jane Austen

This was a lucky recollection -- it saved her from something like regret.

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Jane Austen

As a brother, a landlord, a master, she considered how many people's happiness were in his guardianship! -- How much of pleasure or pain it was in his power to bestow! -- How much of good or evil must...

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Jane Austen

Heaven forbid! -- That would be the greatest misfortune of all! -- To find a man agreeable whom one is determined to hate! -- Do not wish me such an evil.

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Jane Austen

With a book he was regardless of time.

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Jane Austen

Every young lady may feel for my heroine in this critical moment, for every young lady has at some time or other known the same agitation.

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Jane Austen

You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.

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Jane Austen

She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing, than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped.

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Jane Austen

I am determined that only the deepest love will induce me into matrimony. So... I shall end an old maid, and teach your ten children to embroider cushions and play their instruments very ill.

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Jane Austen

Loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her...

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Jane Austen

General benevolence, but not general friendship, made a man what he ought to be.

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Jane Austen

The distance is nothing when one has a motive.

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Jane Austen

It has sunk him, I cannot say how much it has sunk him in my opinion. So unlike what a man should be!-None of that upright integrity, that strict adherence to truth and principle, that distain of trick...

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Jane Austen

She denied none of it aloud, and agreed to none of it in private.

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Jane Austen

I think him every thing that is worthy and amiable.

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Jane Austen

From politics it was an easy step to silence.

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Jane Austen

The enthusiasm of a woman's love is even beyond the biographer's.

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Jane Austen

my good qualities are under your protection, and you are to exaggerate them as much as possible; and, in return, it belongs to me to find occasion for teasing and quarreling with you as often as may be...

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Jane Austen

And from the whole she deduced this useful lesson, that to go previously engaged to a ball, does not necessarily increase either the dignity or enjoyment of a young lady.

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Jane Austen

It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy. I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples.

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Jane Austen

How horrible it is to have so many people killed! And what a blessing that one cares for none of them!

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Jane Austen

I use the verb 'to torment,' as I observed to be your own method, instead of 'to instruct,' supposing them to be now admitted as synonymous.

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Jane Austen

I am going to take a heroine whom no one but myself will much like

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Jane Austen

The world may know my words, but it has no such privileges with my heart

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Jane Austen

I am all astonishment.

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Jane Austen

The younger brother must help to pay for the pleasures of the elder.

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Jane Austen

My object then," replied Darcy, "was to show you, by every civility in my power, that I was not so mean as to resent the past; and I hoped to obtain your forgiveness, to lessen your ill opinion, by letting...

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Jane Austen

I have never yet known what it was to separate esteem from love

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Jane Austen

How wonderful, how very wonderful the operations of time, and the changes of the human mind!

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Jane Austen

And sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in.

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Jane Austen

The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away.

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Jane Austen

Marianne Dashwood was born to an extraordinary fate. She was born to discover the falsehood of her own opinions, and to counteract, by her conduct, her most favourite maxims.

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Jane Austen

Half the sum of attraction, on either side, might have been enough, for he had nothing to do, and she had hardly any body to love." (of Anne Elliot and Captain Wentworth, Persuasion)

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Jane Austen

When any two young people take it into their heads to marry, they are pretty sure by perseverance to carry their point, be they ever so poor, or ever so imprudent, or ever so little likely to be necessary...

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Jane Austen

Sophia shrieked and fainted on the ground – I screamed and instantly ran mad. We remained thus mutually deprived of our senses, some minutes, and on regaining them were deprived of them again. For an...

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Jane Austen

She is probably by this time as tired of me, as I am of her; but as she is too Polite and I am too civil to say so, our letters are still as frequent and affectionate as ever, and our Attachment as firm...

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Jane Austen

I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder now at your knowing any.

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Jane Austen

What! Would I be turned back from doing a thing that I had determined to do, and that I knew to be right, by the airs and interference of such a person, or any person I may say? No, I have no idea of being...

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Jane Austen

Her pleasure in the walk must arise from the exercise and the day, from the view of the last smiles of the year upon the tawny leaves and withered hedges, and from repeating to herself some few of the...

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Jane Austen

Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.

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Jane Austen

Dare not say that man forgets sooner than woman, that his love has an earlier death. I have loved none but you.

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Jane Austen

She is loveliness itself.

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Jane Austen

She looked back as well as she could; but it was all confusion. She had taken up the idea, she supposed and made everything bend to it.

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Jane Austen

I cannot help thinking that it is more natural to have flowers grow out of the head than fruit.

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Jane Austen

people always live for ever when there is an annuity to be paid them

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Jane Austen

I would much rather have been merry than wise.

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Jane Austen

We neither of us perform to strangers.

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Jane Austen

It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberley.

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Jane Austen

Yes," replied Darcy, who could contain himself no longer, "but that was when I first knew her; for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance.

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Jane Austen

She mediated, by turns, on broken promises and broken arches, phaetons and false hangings, Tilneys and trap-doors.

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Jane Austen

I walk: I prefer walking.

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Jane Austen

I am excessively fond of a cottage; there is always so much comfort, so much elegance about them. And I protest, if I had any money to spare, I should buy a little land and build one myself, within a short...

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Jane Austen

I do regard her as one who is too modest for the world in general to be aware of half her accomplishments, and too highly accomplished for modesty to be natural of any other woman.

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Jane Austen

Had Elizabeth been able to encounter his eye, she might have seen how well the expression of heartfelt delight, diffused over his face, became him; but, though she could not look, she could listen, and...

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Jane Austen

We all love to instruct, though we can teach only what is not worth knowing.

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Jane Austen

There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.

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Jane Austen

Money can only give happiness where there is nothing else to give it.

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Jane Austen

Everybody has their taste in noises as well as in other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity.

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Jane Austen

There is safety in reserve, but no attraction. One cannot love a reserved person.

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Jane Austen

Our scars make us know that our past was for real

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Jane Austen

You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.

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Jane Austen

Sometimes the last person on earth you want to be with is the one person you can't be without.

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Jane Austen

Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant.

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Jane Austen

Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world

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Jane Austen

He certainly is very agreeable, and I give you leave to like him. You have liked many a stupider person.

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Jane Austen

With women, the heart argues, not the mind.

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Jane Austen

He is also handsome," replied Elizabeth, "which a young man ought likewise to be, if he possibly can. His character is thereby complete.

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Jane Austen

A single woman, of good fortune, is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as any body else.

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Jane Austen

I have always maintained the importance of Aunts

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Jane Austen

Silly things do cease to be silly if they are done by sensible people in an impudent way.

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Jane Austen

This sweetest and best of all creatures, faultless in spite of all her faults.

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Jane Austen

Catherine [...] enjoyed her usual happiness with Henry Tilney, listening with sparkling eyes to everything he said; and, in finding him irresistible, becoming so herself.

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Jane Austen

If the heroine of one novel be not patronized by the heroine of another, from whom can she expect protection and regard?

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Jane Austen

I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself.

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Jane Austen

There are few people whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see of the world, the more am I dissatisfied with it; and every day confirms my belief of the inconsistency of...

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Jane Austen

She was stronger alone; and her own good sense so well supported her, that her firmness was as unshaken, her appearance of cheerfulness as invariable, as, with regrets so poignant and so fresh, it was...

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Jane Austen

It is not everyone,' said Elinor, 'who has your passion for dead leaves.

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Jane Austen

From the very beginning— from the first moment, I may almost say— of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish...

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Jane Austen

A submissive spirit might be patient, a strong understanding would supply resolution, but here was something more; here was that elasticity of mind, that disposition to be comforted, that power of turning...

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Jane Austen

In vain have I struggled. It will not do. My feelings will not be repressed. You must allow me to tell you how ardently I admire and love you.

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Jane Austen

Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with...

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Jane Austen

Cold-hearted Elinor! Oh! Worse than cold-hearted! Ashamed of being otherwise.--Marianne Dashwood

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Jane Austen

I am only resolved to act in that manner, which will, in my own opinion, constitute my happiness, without reference to you, or to any person so wholly unconnected with me.

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Jane Austen

I encourage him to be in his garden as often as possible. Then he has to walk to Rosings nearly every day. ... I admit I encourage him in that also.

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Jane Austen

We are each of an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all the eclat of a proverb.

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Jane Austen

Indeed, I am very sorry to be right in this instance. I would much rather have been merry than wise.

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Jane Austen

What are men to rocks and mountains?

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Jane Austen

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading! How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book! -- When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not an excellent library.

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Jane Austen

I always deserve the best treatment because I never put up with any other.

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Jane Austen

It would be difficult to say which had seen highest perfection in the other, or which had been the happiest: she, in receiving his declarations and proposals, or he in having them accepted.

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Jane Austen

her spirits wanted the solitude and silence which only numbers could give.

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Jane Austen

A man does not recover from such devotion of the heart to such a woman! He ought not; he does not.

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Jane Austen

They gave themselves up wholly to their sorrow, seeking increase of wretchedness in every reflection that could afford it, and resolved against ever admitting consolation in future.

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Jane Austen

the Musgroves had had the ill fortune of a very troublesome, hopeless son, and the good fortune to lose him before he reached his twentieth year.

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Jane Austen

It is only a novel... or, in short, only some work in which the greatest powers of the mind are displayed, in which the most thorough knowledge of human nature, the happiest delineation of its varieties,...

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Jane Austen

It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;—it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough...

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Jane Austen

His own enjoyment, or his own ease, was, in every particular, his ruling principle.

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Jane Austen

From all that I can collect by your manner of talking, you must be two of the silliest girls in the country. I have suspected it some time, but I am now convinced.

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Jane Austen

Elinor agreed with it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.

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Jane Austen

What do you know of my heart? What do you know of anything but your own suffering. For weeks, Marianne, I've had this pressing on me without being at liberty to speak of it to a single creature. It was...

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Jane Austen

To wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect

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Jane Austen

You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.

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Jane Austen

Do not give way to useless alarm; though it is right to be prepared for the worst, there is no occasion to look on it as certain.

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Jane Austen

At first sight, his address is certainly not striking; and his person can hardly be called handsome, till the expression of his eyes, which are uncommonly good, and the general sweetness of his countenance,...

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Jane Austen

He is a gentleman, and I am a gentleman's daughter. So far we are equal.

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Jane Austen

Obstinate, headstrong girl!

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Jane Austen

My ideas flow so rapidly that I have not time to express them──by which means my letters sometimes convey no ideas at all to my correspondents.

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Jane Austen

Every moment has its pleasures and its hope.

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Jane Austen

Without music, life would be a blank to me.

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Jane Austen

You have qualities which I had not before supposed to exist in such a degree in any human creature. You have some touches of the angel in you.

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Jane Austen

A lady, without a family, was the very best preserver of furniture in the world.

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Jane Austen

Nobody, who has not been in the interior of a family, can say what the difficulties of any individual of that family may be.

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Jane Austen

If I had ever learnt, I should have been a great proficient.

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Jane Austen

There could have never been two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved. Now they were as strangers; nay, worse than strangers, for they could never become...

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Jane Austen

I cannot make speeches, Emma...If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more. But you know what I am. You hear nothing but truth from me. I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have...

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Jane Austen

Elinor could sit still no longer. She almost ran out of the room, and as soon as the door was closed, burst into tears of joy, which at first she thought would never cease.

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Jane Austen

she was oppressed, she was overcome by her own felicity; and happily disposed as is the human mind to be easily familiarized with any change for the better, it required several hours to give sedateness...

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Jane Austen

Miss Morland, no one can think more highly of the understanding of women than I do. In my opinion, nature has given them so much, that they never find it necessary to use more than half.

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Jane Austen

[I]t is well to have as many holds upon happiness as possible.

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Jane Austen

Angry people are not always wise.

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Jane Austen

Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all.

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Jane Austen

Too many cooks spoil the broth

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Jane Austen

Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint!

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Jane Austen

Everything nourishes what is strong already

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Jane Austen

Where the waters do agree, it is quite wonderful the relief they give.

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Jane Austen

You must be the best judge of your own happiness.

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Jane Austen

Reflection must be reserved for solitary hours; whenever she was alone, she gave way to it as the greatest relief; and not a day went by without a solitary walk, in which she might indulge in all the delight...

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Jane Austen

There seemed a gulf impassable between them.

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Jane Austen

Woe betide him, and her too, when it comes to things of consequence, when they are placed in circumstances requiring fortitude and strength of mind, if she have not resolution enough to resist idle interference...

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Jane Austen

What dreadful hot weather we have! It keeps me in a continual state of inelegance.

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Jane Austen

You deserve a longer letter than this; but it is my unhappy fate seldom to treat people so well as they deserve.

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Jane Austen

Marriage is indeed a maneuvering business.

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Jane Austen

Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like.

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Jane Austen

What strange creatures brothers are!

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Jane Austen

I am excessively diverted.

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Jane Austen

..that sanguine expectation of happiness which is happiness itself

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Jane Austen

I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but, like everybody else, it must be in my own way.

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Jane Austen

The longer they were together the more doubtful seemed the nature of his regard, and sometimes for a few painful minutes she believed it to be no more than friendship

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Jane Austen

I do not think it worth while to wait for enjoyment until there is some real opportunity for it.

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Jane Austen

I have not wanted syllables where actions have spoken so plainly.

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Jane Austen

When the evening was over, Anne could not be amused…nor could she help fearing, on more serious reflection, that, like many other great moralists and preachers, she had been eloquent on a point in which...

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Jane Austen

My Emma, does not every thing serve to prove more and more the beauty of truth and sincerity in all our dealings with each other?

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Jane Austen

Wickedness is always wickedness, but folly is not always folly.

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Jane Austen

Time did not compose her.

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Jane Austen

Time will generally lessen the interest of every attachment not within the daily circle.

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Jane Austen

If I could not be persuaded into doing what I thought wrong, I will never be tricked into it.

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Jane Austen

There is nothing I would not do for those who are really my friends. I have no notion of loving people by halves, it is not my nature.

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Jane Austen

I assure you. I have no notion of treating men with such respect. That is the way to spoil them.

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Jane Austen

He listened to her with silent attention, and on her ceasing to speak, rose directly from his seat, and after saying in a voice of emotion, 'To your sister I wish all imaginable happiness; to Willoughby,...

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Jane Austen

Life could do nothing for her, beyond giving time for a better preparation for death.

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Jane Austen

Yes, I found myself, by insensible degrees, sincerely fond of her; and the happiest hours of my life were what I spent with her.

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Jane Austen

Mary wished to say something very sensible, but knew not how.

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Jane Austen

You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever.

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Jane Austen

Real solemn history, I cannot be interested in.... The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all.

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Jane Austen

Look into your own heart because who looks outside, dreams, but who looks inside awakes.

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Jane Austen

Her form, though not so correct as her sister's, in having the advantage of height, was more striking; and her face was so lovely, that when in the common cant of praise she was called a beautiful girl,...

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Jane Austen

Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.

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Jane Austen

It was for the sake of what had been, rather than what was.

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Jane Austen

I was quiet but I was not blind.

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Jane Austen

What are you thinking of so earnestly?" said he, as they walked back to the ballroom; "not of your partner, I hope, for, by that shake of the head, your meditations are not satisfactory." Catherine coloured,...

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Jane Austen

I have faults enough, but they are not, I hope, of understanding. My temper I dare not vouch for. It is, I believe, too little yielding— certainly too little for the convenience of the world. I cannot...

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Jane Austen

I often think," she said, "that there is nothing so bad as parting with one's friends. One seems to forlorn without them.

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Jane Austen

We can all begin freely—a slight preference is natural enough; but there are very few of us who have heart enough to be really in love without encouragement.

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Jane Austen

I cannot think well of a man who sports with any woman's feelings; and there may often be a great deal more suffered than a stander-by can judge of.

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Jane Austen

A woman of seven and twenty, said Marianne, after pausing a moment, can never hope to feel or inspire affection again.

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Jane Austen

Of this she was perfectly unaware; to her he was only the man who had made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.

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Jane Austen

You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope...I have loved none but you.

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Jane Austen

A family of ten children will be always called a fine family, where there are heads and arms and legs enough for the number.

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Jane Austen

I have never yet found that the advice of a Sister could prevent a young Man's being in love if he chose it.

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Jane Austen

The ladies here probably exchanged looks which meant, 'Men never know when things are dirty or not;' and the gentlemen perhaps thought each to himself, 'Women will have their little nonsense and needless...

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Jane Austen

You may only call me "Mrs. Darcy"... when you are completely, and perfectly, and incandescently happy.

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Jane Austen

That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long enough. Let the other young ladies have time to exhibit.

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Jane Austen

Mr. Bennet, how can you abuse your own children in such a way? You take delight in vexing me. You have no compassion for my poor nerves." "You mistake me, my dear. I have a high respect for your nerves....

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Jane Austen

She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older: the natural sequel of an unnatural beginning.

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Jane Austen

I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine.

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Jane Austen

A report of a most alarming nature reached me two days ago.

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Jane Austen

I certainly must,' said she. 'This sensation of listlessness, weariness, stupidity, this disinclination to sit down and employ myself, this feeling of everything's being dull and insipid about the house!...

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Jane Austen

Far be it from me, my dear sister, to depreciate such pleasures. They would doubtless be congenial with the generality of female minds. But I confess they would have no charms for me. I should infinitely...

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Jane Austen

She knew that what Marianne and her mother conjectured one moment, they believed the next: that with them, to wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect.

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Jane Austen

I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.

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Jane Austen

but for my own part, if a book is well written, I always find it too short.

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Jane Austen

I am no indiscriminate novel reader. The mere trash of the common circulating library I hold in the highest contempt.

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Jane Austen

It's been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable.

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Jane Austen

My characters shall have, after a little trouble, all that they desire.

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Jane Austen

I can easily believe it. Women of that class have great opportunities, and if they are intelligent may be well worth listening to. Such varieites of human nature as they are in the habit of witnessing!...

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Jane Austen

Vanity, not love, has been my folly.

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Jane Austen

…dearest, loveliest Elizabeth [...] By you, I was properly humbled.

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Jane Austen

Where so many hours have been spent in convincing myself that I am right, is there not some reason to fear I may be wrong?

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Jane Austen

No young lady can be justified in falling in love before the gentleman's love is declared, it must be very improper that a young lady should dream of a gentleman before the gentleman is first known to...

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Jane Austen

But your mind is warped by an innate principle of general integrity, and, therefore, not accessible to the cool reasonings of family partiality, or a desire of revenge.

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Jane Austen

I may have lost my heart, but not my self-control.

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Jane Austen

Mr. Knightley, if I have not spoken, it is because I am afraid I will awaken myself from this dream.

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Jane Austen

Better be without sense than misapply it as you do.

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Jane Austen

Dear Diary, Today I tried not to think about Mr. Knightly. I tried not to think about him when I discussed the menu with Cook... I tried not to think about him in the garden where I thrice plucked the...

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Jane Austen

I am not at all in a humor for writing; I must write on till I am.

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Jane Austen

I . . . am always half afraid of finding a clever novel too clever--& of finding my own story & my own people all forestalled.

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Jane Austen

I have not the pleasure of understanding you.

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Jane Austen

Grant us peace, Almighty Father, so to pray as to deserve to be heard.

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Jane Austen

Men of sense, whatever you may choose to say, do not want silly wives.

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Jane Austen

Arguments are too much like disputes.

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Jane Austen

I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow.

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Jane Austen

She was humbled, she was grieved; she repented, though she hardly knew of what. She became jealous of his esteem, when she could no longer hope to be benefited by it. She wanted to hear of him, when there...

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Jane Austen

He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and every body hoped that he would never come there again.

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Jane Austen

It is wonderful, for almost all his actions may be traced to pride;-and pride has often been his best friend.

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Jane Austen

May I ask you what these questions tend?' 'Merely to the illustration of your character,' said she, endeavouring to shake off her gravity. 'I am trying to make it out.' 'And what is your success?' She...

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Jane Austen

There was no being displeased with such an encourager, for his admiration made him discern a likeness before it was possible.

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Jane Austen

I must learn to be content with being happier than I deserve.

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Jane Austen

She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.

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Jane Austen

for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quite a misfortune to be liked by him.

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Jane Austen

I particularly recollect your saying one night, after they had been dining at Netherfield, 'SHE a beauty!--I should as soon call her mother a wit.' But afterwards she seemed to improve on you, and I believe...

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Jane Austen

that you seemed almost as fearful of notice and praise as other women were of neglect. (Edmund to Fanny)

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Jane Austen

to hope was to expect

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Jane Austen

There will be little rubs and disappointments everywhere, and we are all apt to expect too much; but then, if one scheme of happiness fails, human nature turns to another; if the first calculation is wrong,...

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Jane Austen

We met Dr. Hall in such deep mourning that either his mother, his wife, or himself must be dead.

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Jane Austen

Time will explain.

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Jane Austen

No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be a heroine... But from fifteen to seventeen she was in training for a heroine...

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Jane Austen

But Shakespeare one gets acquainted with without knowing how. It is a part of an Englishman's constitution. His thoughts and beauties are so spread abroad that one touches them everywhere; one is intimate...

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Jane Austen

An interval of meditation, serious and grateful, was the best corrective of everything dangerous.

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Jane Austen

I am now convinced that I have never been much in love; for had I really experienced that pure and elevating passion, I should at present detest his very name, and wish him all manner of evil. But my feelings...

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Jane Austen

If you were to give me forty such men, I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness. No, no, let me shift for myself; and, perhaps, if...

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Jane Austen

I am sorry to tell you that I am getting very extravagant and spending all my money: and what is worse for you, I have been spending yours too.

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Jane Austen

And what am I to do on the occasion? -- It seems an hopeless business.

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Jane Austen

Do you not want to know who has taken it?" cried his wife impatiently.

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Jane Austen

If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities...

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Jane Austen

...I will not allow books to prove any thing." "But how shall we prove any thing?" "We never shall.

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Jane Austen

You either choose this method of passing the evening because you are in each other's confidence, and have secret affairs to discuss, or because you are conscious that your figures appear to the greatest...

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Jane Austen

Always resignation and acceptance. Always prudence and honour and duty. Elinor, where is your heart?

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Jane Austen

She tried to explain the real state of the case to her sister. "I do not attempt to deny," said she, "that I think very highly of him--that I greatly esteem, that I like him." Marianne here burst with...

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Jane Austen

She hardly knew how to suppose that she could be an object of admiration to so great a man.

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Jane Austen

I am not fond of the idea of my shrubberies being always approachable.

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Jane Austen

You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking, and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused, and interested you, because I was so unlike them.

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Jane Austen

And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody." "And yours," he replied with a smile, "is willfully to misunderstand them.

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Jane Austen

It taught me to hope," said he, "as I had scarcely ever allowed myself to hope before." Mr. Darcy - Pride and Prejudice

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Jane Austen

It was a delightful visit;-perfect, in being much too short.

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Jane Austen

How she might have felt had there been no Captain Wentworth in the case, was not worth enquiry; for there was a Captain Wentworth: and be the conclusion of the present suspense good or bad, her affection...

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Jane Austen

She will never submit to any thing requiring industry and patience, and a subjection of the fancy to the understanding.

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Jane Austen

Marry me. Marry me, my wonderful, darling friend.

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Jane Austen

I could not sit seriously down to write a serious Romance under any other motive than to save my life, & if it were indispensable for me to keep it up & never relax into laughing at myself or other...

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Jane Austen

It sometimes is a disadvantage to be so very guarded. If a woman conceals her affection from the object of it, she may loose the opportunity of fixing him.

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Jane Austen

Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?

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Jane Austen

Now be sincere; did you admire me for my impertinence?" "For the liveliness of your mind, I did.

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Jane Austen

What have wealth or grandeur to do with happiness?" Grandeur has but little," said Elinor, "but wealth has much to do with it." Elinor, for shame!" Said Marianne. "Money can only give happiness where there...

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Jane Austen

I come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, that my heart is and always will be yours.

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Jane Austen

Mr. Collins is a conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man; you know he is, as well as I do; and you must feel, as well as I do, that the woman who married him cannot have a proper way of thinking.

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Jane Austen

She hoped to be wise and reasonable in time; but alas! Alas! She must confess to herself that she was not wise yet.

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Jane Austen

Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial, but generally speaking it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber; it is selfishness and impatience rather than...

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Jane Austen

Your countenance perfectly informs me that you were in company last night with the person, whom you think the most agreeable in the world, the person who interests you at this present time, more than all...

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Jane Austen

She tried to be calm, and leave things to take their course; and tried to dwell much on this argument of rational dependence – “Surely, if there be constant attachment on each side, our hearts must...

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Jane Austen

[Mrs. Allen was] never satisfied with the day unless she spent the chief of it by the side of Mrs. Thorpe, in what they called conversation, but in which there was scarcely ever any exchange of opinion,...

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Jane Austen

She was sensible and clever, but eager in everything; her sorrows, her joys, could have no moderation.

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Jane Austen

If I could but know his heart, everything would become easy.

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Jane Austen

I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice. I am happier even than Jane; she only smiles, I laugh.

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Jane Austen

But when a young lady is to be a heroine, the perverseness of forty surrounding families cannot prevent her. Something must and will happen to throw a hero in her way.

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Jane Austen

Every savage can dance.

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Jane Austen

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. If the dispositions of the parties are ever so well known to each other or ever so similar beforehand, it does not advance their felicity in the least....

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Jane Austen

It is particularly incumbent on those who never change their opinion, to be secure of judging properly at first.

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Jane Austen

They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects.

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Jane Austen

We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but this would be nothing if you really liked him.

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Jane Austen

I have not a doubt of your doing very well together. Your tempers are by no means unlike. You are each of you so complying, that nothing will ever be resolved on; so easy, that every servant will cheat...

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Jane Austen

We are all fools in love

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Jane Austen

She was not often invited to join in the conversation of the others, nor did she desire it. Her own thoughts and reflections were habitually her best companions.

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Jane Austen

...faultless in spite of all her faults...

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Jane Austen

No: the years which had destroyed her youth and bloom had only given him a more glowing, manly, open look, in no respect lessening his personal advantages. She had seen the same Frederick Wentworth.

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Jane Austen

Nobody can tell what I suffer! But it is always so. Those who do not complain are never pitied.

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Jane Austen

There is, I believe, in every disposition a tendency to some particular evil, a natural defect, which not even the best education can overcome." "And your defect is a propensity to hate everybody." "And...

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Jane Austen

I can always live by my pen.

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Jane Austen

And pictures of perfection, as you know, make me sick and wicked.

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Jane Austen

Perhaps it is our imperfections that make us so perfect for one another.

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Jane Austen

I have the highest respect for your nerves, they are my old friends.

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Jane Austen

That is what I like; that is what a young man ought to be. Whatever be his pursuits, his eagerness in them should know no moderation, and leave him no sense of fatigue.

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Jane Austen

I have had to contend against the unkindness of his sister, and the insolence of his mother; and have suffered the punishment of an attachment, without enjoying its advantages.

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Jane Austen

I frequently observe that one pretty face would be followed by five and thirty frights.

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Jane Austen

I must have my share in the conversation…

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Jane Austen

We do not suffer by accident.

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Jane Austen

What a shame, for I dearly love to laugh.

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Jane Austen

I take no leave of you, Miss Bennet: I send no compliments to your mother. You deserve no such attention. I am most seriously displeased.

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“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss