Marcus Tullius Cicero

Occupation: Philosopher

Quotes of Marcus Tullius Cicero

Marcus Tullius Cicero

To teach is a necessity, to please is a sweetness, to persuade is a victory.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

True law is right reason in agreement with nature;...it summons to duty by its commands, and averts from wrongdoing by its prohibitions...It is a sin to try to alter this law, nor is it allowable to repeal...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

God's law is 'right reason.' When perfectly understood it is called 'wisdom.' When applied by government in regulating human relations it is called 'justice.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We must not only obtain Wisdom: we must enjoy her.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If the truth were self-evident, eloquence would be unnecessary.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship is the only thing in the world concerning the usefulness of which all mankind are agreed.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century: Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others; Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected; Insisting that a thing is impossible...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Where is there dignity unless there is honesty?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In a disordered mind, as in a disordered body, soundness of health is impossible.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Let flattery, the handmaid of the vices, be far removed .

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Advice is judged by results, not by intentions.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

. . . for until that God who rules all the region of the sky . . . has freed you from the fetters of your body, you cannot gain admission here. Men were created with the understanding that they were to...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Non nobis solum nati sumus. (Not for ourselves alone are we born.)

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

He who has a garden and a library wants for nothing.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Any man may make a mistake; none but a fool will stick to it. Second thoughts are best as the proverb says.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We are all excited by the love of praise, and the noblest are most influenced by glory.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In men of the highest character and noblest genius there is to be found an insatiable desire for honor, command, power, and glory.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A thankful heart is the greatest virtue.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Superstition is an unreasoning fear of God.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A community is like the ones who govern it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Freedom is participation in power.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The higher our position the more modestly we should behave.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The life given us, by nature is short; but the memory of a well-spent life is eternal.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No man can be brave who thinks pain the greatest evil; nor temperate, who considers pleasure the highest good.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Read at every wait; read at all hours; read within leisure; read in times of labor; read as one goes in; read as one goest out. The task of the educated mind is simply put: read to lead.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A mind without instruction can no more bear fruit than can a field, however fertile, without cultivation.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

This wine is forty years old. It certainly doesn't show its age.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Dum Spiro, spero- As long as I breathe, I hope.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No sensible man ever imputes inconsistency to another for changing his minds.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

These studies are a spur to the young, a delight to the old: an ornament in prosperity, a consoling refuge in adversity; they are pleasure for us at home, and no burden abroad; they stay up with us at...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

All action is of the mind and the mirror of the mind is the face, its index the eyes.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is a true saying that 'one falsehood easily leads to another.'

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Diseases of the soul are more dangerous and more numerous than those of the body.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nature herself has imprinted on the minds of all the idea of God

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Dogs wait for us faithfully.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For of all gainful professions, nothing is better, nothing more pleasing, nothing more delightful, nothing better becomes a well-bred man than #‎ agriculture

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Orators are most vehement when they have the weakest cause, as men get on horseback when they cannot walk.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

He who acknowledges a kindness has it still, and he who has a grateful sense of it has requited it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Since an intelligence common to us all makes things known to us and formulates them in our minds, honorable actions are ascribed by us to virtue, and dishonorable actions to vice; and only a madman would...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Inability to tell good from evil is the greatest worry of man's life.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The more virtuous any man is, the less easily does he suspect others to be vicious.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Even if you have nothing to write, write and say so.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Whatever you do, do with all your might.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nature abhors annihilation.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The first law for the historian is that he shall never dare utter an untruth. The second is that he shall suppress nothing that is true. Moreover, there shall be no suspicion of partiality in his writing,...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Everything is alive... Everything is interconnected.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Justice renders to every one his due.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Extreme justice is extreme injustice.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For there is but one essential justice which cements society, and one law which establishes this justice. This law is right reason, which is the true rule of all commandments and prohibitions. Whoever...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Do not blame Caesar, blame the people of Rome who have so enthusiastically acclaimed and adored him and rejoiced in their loss of freedom and danced in his path and gave him triumphal processions. Blame...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For books are more than books, they are the life, the very heart and core of ages past, the reason why men worked and died, the essence and quintessence of their lives.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Not to know what happened before you were born is to be a child forever. For what is the time of a man, except it be interwoven with that memory of ancient things of a superior age?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Like readily consorts with like.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Let the welfare of the people be the ultimate law.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No one dances sober, unless he is insane.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The name of peace is sweet, and the thing itself is beneficial, but there is a great difference between peace and servitude. Peace is freedom in tranquillity, servitude is the worst of all evils, to be...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is nothing proper about what you are doing, soldier, but do try to kill me properly.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Most happy is he who is entirely self-reliant, and who centers all his requirements in himself alone.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Kindness is produced by kindness.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Wars are to be undertaken in order that it may be possible to live in peace without molestation.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Thus in the beginning the world was so made that certain signs come before certain events.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

That he who hath the loan of money has not repaid it, and he who has repaid has not the loan; but he who has acknowledged a kindness has it still, and he who has a feeling of it has requited it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

He he he... Crazy? Cicero? He he he he! That's... madness...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

But the Night Mother is mother to all! It is her voice we follow! Her will! Would you dare risk disobedience? And surely... punishment?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Laughing, laughing, laughing, laughing! It is the jester! A voice from the Void, to cheer poor Cicero! I accept your gift, dearest Night Mother. Thank you for my laughter. Thank you for my friend.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Hmm... That's like telling you about the cold of space, or terror of midnight. Sithis is all those things. He is... the Void.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Cicero is dead! Cicero is born! The laughter has filled me, filled me so very completely. I am the laughter. I am the jester. The soul that has served as my constant companion for so long has breached...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Never was a government that was not composed of liars, malefactors and thieves.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

History is the witness that testifies to the passing of time...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No one can speak well, unless he thoroughly understands his subject.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The life of the dead is placed on the memories of the living. The love you gave in life keeps people alive beyond their time. Anyone who was given love will always live on in another's heart.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The celestial order and the beauty of the universe compel me to admit that there is some excellent and eternal Being, who deserves the respect and homage of men

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Memory is the receptacle and sheath of all knowledge

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The shifts of fortune test the reliability of friends.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In ancient times music was the foundation of all the sciences. Education was begun with music with the persuasion that nothing could be expected of a man who was ignorant of music.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

As I give thought to the matter, I find four causes for the apparent misery of old age; first it withdraws us from active accomplishments; second, it renders the body less powerful; third, it deprives...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nor do I regret that I have lived, since I have so lived that I think I was not born in vain, and I quit life as if it were an inn, not a home.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Your enemies can kill you, but only your friends can hurt you.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No man should so act as to make a gain out of the ignorance of another.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Reason should direct, and appetite obey.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is pleasant to recall past troubles.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

He cannot be strict in judging, who does not wish others to be strict judges of himself.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

They condemn what they do not understand.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Our span of life is brief, but is long enough for us to live well and honestly.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Politicians are not born; they are excreted.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In extraordinary events ignorance of their causes produces astonishment.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Through ignorance of what is good and what is bad, the life of men is greatly perplexed.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Whatever that be which thinks, understands, wills, and acts, it is something celestial and divine.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Neither can embellishments of language be found without arrangement and expression of thoughts, nor can thoughts be made to shine without the light of language.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is, I know not how, a certain presage, as it were, of a future existence; and this takes the deepest root, and is most discoverable, in the greatest geniuses and most exalted souls.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The nearer I approach death the more I feel like one who is in sight of land at last and is about to anchor in one's home port after a long voyage.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In nothing do men more nearly approach the gods, than in giving health to men.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There never was a great soul that did not have some divine inspiration.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We are bound by the law, so that we may be free.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing contributes to the entertainment of the reader more, than the change of times and the vicissitudes of fortune.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no place more delightful than home.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The man who backbites an absent friend, nay, who does not stand up for him when another blames him, the man who angles for bursts of laughter and for the repute of a wit, who can invent what he never saw,...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to continue always a child.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

History is indeed the witness of the times, the light of truth.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Here is a man whose life and actions the world has already condemned - yet whose enormous fortune...has already brought him acquittal!

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We should measure affection, not like youngsters by the ardor of its passion, but by its strength and constancy.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

When a government becomes powerful it is destructive, extravagant and violent; it is an usurer which takes bread from innocent mouths and deprives honorable men of their substance, for votes with which...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The following passage is one of those cited by Copernicus himself in his preface to De Revolutionibus: "The Syracusan Hicetas, as Theophrastus asserts, holds the view that the heaven, sun, moon, stars,...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

People don't know the value of what they have until it is gone: Freedom suppressed and again regained bites with keener fangs than freedom never endangered.... Liberty is rendered even more precious by...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is not enough merely possess virtue, as if it were an art; it should be practiced.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within. An enemy at the gates is less formidable, for he is known and carries his banner openly. But the traitor...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

An agreement of rash men (a conspiracy).

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Tall oaks grow from little acorns.Testing. This is the text of an item. Testing. Origin. Testing. Quoted. Testing. Source. The diligent farmer plants trees, of which he himself will never see the fruit.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What is so beneficial to the people as liberty, which we see not only to be greedily sought after by men, but also by beasts, and to be prepared in all things.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Apollo, sacred guard of earth's true core, Whence first came frenzied, wild prophetic word...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no opinion so stupid that it can't be expressed by some philosopher.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

History is the witness that testifies to the passing of time; it illumines reality, vitalizes memory, provides guidance in daily life and brings us tidings of antiquities. 


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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing so cements and holds together all the parts of a society as faith or credit, which can never be kept up unless men are under some force or necessity of honestly paying what they owe to one another.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A man of courage is also full of faith.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The life of the dead is placed in the memory of the living.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The wise are instructed by reason, average minds by experience, the stupid by necessity and the brute by instinct.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Any man can make mistakes, but only an idiot persists in his error.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nobody can give you wiser advice than yourself.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The rule of friendship means there should be mutual sympathy between them, each supplying what the other lacks and trying to benefit the other, always using friendly and sincere words.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The pursuit, even of the best things, ought to be calm and tranquil.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If you have no confidence in self, you are twice defeated in the race of life. With confidence, you have won even before you have started.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

While there's life, there's hope.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The more laws, the less justice.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing is more noble, nothing more venerable than fidelity. Faithfulness and truth are the most sacred excellences and endowments of the human mind.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing is more unreliable than the populace, nothing more obscure than human intentions, nothing more deceptive than the whole electoral system.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What sweetness is left in life, if you take away friendship? Robbing life of friendship is like robbing the world of the sun. A true friend is more to be esteemed than kinsfolk.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A friend is, as it were, a second self.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship improves happiness and abates misery, by the doubling of our joy and the dividing of our grief.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In a republic this rule ought to be observed: that the majority should not have the predominant power.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Cultivation to the mind is as necessary as food to the body.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Just as the soul fills the body, so God fills the world. Just as the soul bears the body, so God endures the world. Just as the soul sees but is not seen, so God sees but is not seen. Just as the soul...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

According to the law of nature it is only fair that no one should become richer through damages and injuries suffered by another.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is not by muscle, speed, or physical dexterity that great things are achieved, but by reflection, force of character, and judgment.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Advice in old age is foolish; for what can be more absurd than to increase our provisions for the road the nearer we approach to our journey's end.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

As fire when thrown into water is cooled down and put out, so also a false accusation when brought against a man of the purest and holiest character, boils over and is at once dissipated, and vanishes...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Brevity is a great charm of eloquence.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The enemy is within the gates; it is with our own luxury, our own folly, our own criminality that we have to contend.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A home without books is a body without soul.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Silence is one of the great arts of conversation.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The higher we are placed, the more humbly we should walk.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If we are not ashamed to think it, we should not be ashamed to say it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The function of wisdom is to discriminate between good and evil.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

As I approve of a youth that has something of the old man in him, so I am no less pleased with an old man that has something of the youth. He that follows this rule may be old in body, but can never be...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Freedom is a man's natural power of doing what he pleases, so far as he is not prevented by force or law.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Let us not listen to those who think we ought to be angry with our enemies, and who believe this to be great and manly. Nothing is so praiseworthy, nothing so clearly shows a great and noble soul, as clemency...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I prefer tongue-tied knowledge to ignorant loquacity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

An unjust peace is better than a just war.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Those wars are unjust which are undertaken without provocation. For only a war waged for revenge or defense can be just.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What is permissible is not always honorable.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

More law, less justice.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Next to God we are nothing. To God we are Everything.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No one has the right to be sorry for himself for a misfortune that strikes everyone.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing is so unbelievable that oratory cannot make it acceptable.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Any man is liable to err, only a fool persists in error.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Freedom is a possession of inestimable value.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is foolish to tear one's hair in grief, as though sorrow would be made less by baldness.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is the nature of every person to error, but only the fool perseveres in error.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Love is the attempt to form a friendship inspired by beauty.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The safety of the people shall be the highest law.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The spirit is the true self. The spirit, the will to win, and the will to excel are the things that endure.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No sane man will dance.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What nobler employment, or more valuable to the state, than that of the man who instructs the rising generation?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Though silence is not necessarily an admission, it is not a denial, either.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Peace is liberty in tranquillity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Take from a man his reputation for probity, and the more shrewd and clever he is, the more hated and mistrusted he becomes.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The authority of those who teach is often an obstacle to those who want to learn.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I am not ashamed to confess that I am ignorant of what I do not know.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No one was ever great without some portion of divine inspiration.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Confidence is that feeling by which the mind embarks in great and honorable courses with a sure hope and trust in itself.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Never injure a friend, even in jest.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In so far as the mind is stronger than the body, so are the ills contracted by the mind more severe than those contracted by the body.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Never go to excess, but let moderation be your guide.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is nothing so absurd that some philosopher has not already said it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What then is freedom? The power to live as one wishes.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

All pain is either severe or slight, if slight, it is easily endured; if severe, it will without doubt be brief.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Memory is the treasury and guardian of all things.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Liberty consists in the power of doing that which is permitted by the law.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Of all nature's gifts to the human race, what is sweeter to a man than his children?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The sinews of war are infinite money.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In honorable dealing you should consider what you intended, not what you said or thought.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Laws should be interpreted in a liberal sense so that their intention may be preserved.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The harvest of old age is the recollection and abundance of blessing previously secured.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

When you have no basis for an argument, abuse the plaintiff.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Ability without honor is useless.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It might be pardonable to refuse to defend some men, but to defend them negligently is nothing short of criminal.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

True glory takes root, and even spreads; all false pretences, like flowers, fall to the ground; nor can any counterfeit last long.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

True nobility is exempt from fear.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Laws are silent in time of war.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A tear dries quickly when it is shed for troubles of others.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing is so strongly fortified that it cannot be taken by money.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Sweet is the memory of past troubles.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The magistrates are the ministers for the laws, the judges their interpreters, the rest of us are servants of the law, that we all may be free.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The nobler a man, the harder it is for him to suspect inferiority in others.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The study and knowledge of the universe would somehow be lame and defective were no practical results to follow.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Every man can tell how many goats or sheep he possesses, but not how many friends.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

O wretched man, wretched not just because of what you are, but also because you do not know how wretched you are!

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Old age: the crown of life, our play's last act.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A man's own manner and character is what most becomes him.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Great is the power of habit. It teaches us to bear fatigue and to despise wounds and pain.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Live as brave men; and if fortune is adverse, front its blows with brave hearts.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Orators are most vehement when their cause is weak.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

So near is falsehood to truth that a wise man would do well not to trust himself on the narrow edge.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The greater the difficulty, the greater the glory.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The only excuse for war is that we may live in peace unharmed.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Cannot people realize how large an income is thrift?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For how many things, which for our own sake we should never do, do we perform for the sake of our friends.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Thrift is of great revenue.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

People do not understand what a great revenue economy is.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Rashness belongs to youth; prudence to old age.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Time destroys the speculation of men, but it confirms nature.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

When you are aspiring to the highest place, it is honorable to reach the second or even the third rank.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Brevity is the best recommendation of speech, whether in a senator or an orator.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Glory follows virtue as if it were its shadow.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Justice consists in doing no injury to men; decency in giving them no offense.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The countenance is the portrait of the soul, and the eyes mark its intentions.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The false is nothing but an imitation of the true.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Virtue is a habit of the mind, consistent with nature and moderation and reason.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What is thine is mine, and all mine is thine.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A letter does not blush.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Fear is not a lasting teacher of duty.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Hatred is inveterate anger.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Hatred is settled anger.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

He only employs his passion who can make no use of his reason.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I criticize by creation - not by finding fault.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In everything truth surpasses the imitation and copy.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nature has planted in our minds an insatiable longing to see the truth.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Rightly defined philosophy is simply the love of wisdom.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The precepts of the law are these: to live honestly, to injure no one, and to give everyone else his due.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We forget our pleasures, we remember our sufferings.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Before beginning, plan carefully.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Death is not natural for a state as it is for a human being, for whom death is not only necessary, but frequently even desirable.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Honor is the reward of virtue.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I never admire another's fortune so much that I became dissatisfied with my own.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In doubtful cases the more liberal interpretation must always be preferred.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Justice is the set and constant purpose which gives every man his due.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No obligation to do the impossible is binding.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing stands out so conspicuously, or remains so firmly fixed in the memory, as something which you have blundered.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Rather leave the crime of the guilty unpunished than condemn the innocent.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The best interpreter of the law is custom.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The greatest pleasures are only narrowly separated from disgust.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There are more men ennobled by study than by nature.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We must conceive of this whole universe as one commonwealth of which both gods and men are members.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What gift has providence bestowed on man that is so dear to him as his children?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For a tear is quickly dried, especially when shed for the misfortunes of others.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Frivolity is inborn, conceit acquired by education.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Great is our admiration of the orator who speaks with fluency and discretion.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Hatreds not vowed and concealed are to be feared more than those openly declared.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In everything, satiety closely follows the greatest pleasures.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It shows nobility to be willing to increase your debt to a man to whom you already owe much.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No poet or orator has ever existed who believed there was any better than himself.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Not cohabitation but consensus constitutes marriage.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The eyes like sentinel occupy the highest place in the body.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The long time to come when I shall not exist has more effect on me than this short present time, which nevertheless seems endless.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To know the laws is not to memorize their letter but to grasp their full force and meaning.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To some extent I liken slavery to death.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What an ugly beast the ape, and how like us.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What one has, one ought to use: and whatever he does he should do with all his might.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We should not be so taken up in the search for truth, as to neglect the needful duties of active life; for it is only action that gives a true value and commendation to virtue.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If you pursue good with labor, the labor passes away but the good remains; if you pursue evil with pleasure, the pleasure passes away and the evil remains.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I never heard of an old man forgetting where he had buried his money! Old people remember what interests them: the dates fixed for their lawsuits, and the names of their debtors and creditors.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Our character is not so much the product of race and heredity as of those circumstances by which nature forms our habits, by which we are nurtured and live.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If I err in belief that the souls of men are immortal, I gladly err, nor do I wish this error which gives me pleasure to be wrested from me while I live.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

This is the truth: as from a fire aflame thousands of sparks come forth, even so from the Creator an infinity of beings have life and to him return again.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We are motivated by a keen desire for praise, and the better a man is the more he is inspired by glory. The very philosophers themselves, even in those books which they write in contempt of glory, inscribe...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

One who sees the Supersoul accompanying the individual soul in all bodies and who understands that neither the soul nor the Supersoul is ever destroyed, actually sees.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Enjoy the blessing of strength while you have it and do not bewail it when it is gone, unless, forsooth, you believe that youth must lament the loss of infancy, or early manhood the passing of youth. Life's...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I cease not to advocate peace; even though unjust it is better than the most just war.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

O philosophy, you leader of life.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Exercise and temperance can preserve something of our early strength even in old age.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Thus nature has no love for solitude, and always leans, as it were, on some support; and the sweetest support is found in the most intimate friendship.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It shows a brave and resolute spirit not to be agitated in exciting circumstances.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A nation can survive its fools, and even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A happy life consists in tranquility of mind.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship, on the other hand, serves a great host of different purposes all at the same time. In whatever direction you turn, it still remains yours. No barrier can shut it out. It can never be untimely;...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Lucius Cassius ille quem populus Romanus verissimum et sapientissimum iudicem putabat identidem in causis quaerere solebat 'cui bono' fuisset. The famous Lucius Cassius, whom the Roman people used to regard...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If you would abolish covetousness, you must abolish its mother, profusion.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The multitude of fools is a protection to the wise.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A person who is wise does nothing against their will, nothing with sighing or under coercion.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

When you wish to instruct, be brief; that men's [children's] minds take in quickly what you say, learn its lesson, and retain it faithfully. Every word that is unnecessary only pours over the side of a...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Things perfected by nature are better than those finished by art.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I follow nature as the surest guide, and resign myself with implicit obedience to her sacred ordinances.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nature has circumscribed the field of life within small dimensions, but has left the field of glory unmeasured.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Law is the highest reason implanted in Nature, which commands what ought to be done and forbids the opposite.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Not in opinion but in nature is law founded.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nature herself makes the wise man rich.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The beauty of the world and the orderly arrangement of everything celestial makes us confess that there is an excellent and eternal nature, which ought to be worshiped and admired by all mankind.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In friendship we find nothing false or insincere; everything is straight forward, and springs from the heart.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I cannot find a faithful message-bearer," he wrote to his friend, the scholar Atticus. "How few are they who are able to carry a rather weighty letter without lightening it by reading.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To give and receive advice - the former with freedom, and yet without bitterness, the latter with patience and without irritation - is peculiarly appropriate to geniune friendship.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Ill gotten gains will be ill spent.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If I had more time, I would have written a shorter letter.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Life is nothing without friendship.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No tempest or conflagration, however great, is harder to quell than mob carried away by the novelty of power.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

This excessive licence, which the anarchists think is the only true freedom, provides the stock, as it were, from which a tyrant grows.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Generosity should never exceed ability.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The good of the people is the greatest law.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The wise man knows nothing if he cannot benefit from his wisdom. Wisdom is not only to be acquired, but also to be utilized.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is better to receive than to do injury.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The injuries that befall us unexpectedly are less severe than those which are deliberately anticipated.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To stumble twice against the same stone is a Proverbsial disgrace.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is pleasure in calm remembrance of a past sorrow.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The soil of their native land is dear to all the hearts of mankind.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no quality I would rather have, and be thought to have, than gratitude. For it is not only the greatest virtue, but is the mother of all the rest.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is wickedness in the intention of wickedness, even though it be not perpetrated in the act.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship was given by nature to be an assistant to virtue, not a companion in vice.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The causes of events are ever more interesting than the events themselves.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In all matters, before beginning, a diligent preparation should be made.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Such are a well regulated militia, composed of the freeholders, citizen and husbandman, who take up arms to preserve their property, as individuals, and their rights as freemen.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friends, though absent, are still present.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If you possess a library and a garden, you have everything you need. (translation from the French) Si vous possedez une bibliotheque et un jardin, vous avez tout ce qu'il vous faut.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There are gems of thought that are ageless and eternal.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Can there be greater foolishness than the respect you pay to people collectively when you despise them individually?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I have always been of the opinion that unpopularity earned by doing what is right is not unpopularity at all, but glory.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

My precept to all who build, is, that the owner should be an ornament to the house, and not the house to the owner.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is not a virtue, but a deceptive copy and imitation of virtue, when we are led to the performance of duty by pleasure as its recompense.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Within the character of the citizen, lies the welfare of the nation.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The diligent farmer plants trees, of which he himself will never see the fruit.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A mental stain can neither be blotted out by the passage of time nor washed away by any waters.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The best Armour of Old Age is a well spent life preceding it; a Life employed in the Pursuit of useful Knowledge, in honourable Actions and the Practice of Virtue; in which he who labours to improve himself...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

They are, all of them, born with raging fanaticism in their hearts, just as the Bretons and the Germans are born with blond hair. I would not be in the least bit surprised if these people would not some...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Our generosity never should exceed our abilities.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In nothing do humans approach so nearly to the gods as doing good to others.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Let the punishment match the offense.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Probability is the very guide of life.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Like associates with like.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is the act of a bad man to deceive by falsehood.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

They who say that we should love our fellow-citizens but not foreigners, destroy the universal brotherhood of mankind, with which benevolence and justice would perish forever.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing troubles you for which you do not yearn.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Virtue is its own reward.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Whatever is done without ostentation, and without the people being witnesses of it, is, in my opinion, most praiseworthy: not that the public eye should be entirely avoided, for good actions desire to...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A good orator is pointed and impassioned.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The administration of government, like a guardianship ought to be directed to the good of those who confer, not of those who receive the trust.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Be a pattern to others and then all will go well.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Though liberty is established by law, we must be vigilant, for liberty to enslave us is always present under that very liberty. Our Constitution speaks of the "general welfare of the people." Under that...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Great is the power, great is the authority of a senate that is unanimous in its opinions.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If only every man would make proper use of his strength and do his utmost, he need never regret his limited ability.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The home is the empire! There is no peace more delightful than one's own fireplace.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Softly! Softly! I want none but the judges to hear me. The Jews have already gotten me into a fine mess, as they have many other gentleman. I have no desire to furnish further grist for their mills.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Loyalty is what we seek in friendship.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Victory is by nature insolent and haughty.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

That last day does not bring extinction to us, but change of place.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A nation can survive its fools, even the ambitious. But it cannot survive treason from within....for the traitor appears not to be a traitor...he rots the soul of a nation...he infects the body politic...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Everyone has the obligation to ponder well his own specific traits of character. He must also regulate them adequately and not wonder whether someone else's traits might suit him better. The more definitely...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The mind becomes accustomed to things by the habitual sight of them, and neither wonders nor inquires about the reasons for things it sees all the time.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Crimes are not to be measured by the issue of events, but by the bad intentions of men.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Men decide far more problems by hate, love, lust, rage, sorrow, joy, hope, fear, illusion or some other inward emotion, than by reality, authority, any legal standard, judicial precedent, or statute.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If a man cannot feel the power of God when he looks upon the stars, then I doubt whether he is capable of any feeling at all.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The Jews belong to a dark and repulsive force. One knows how numerous this clique is, how they stick together and what power they exercise through their unions. They are a nation of rascals and deceivers.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

So it may well be believed that when I found him taking a complete holiday, with a vast supply of books at command, he had the air of indulging in a literary debauch, if the term may be applied to so honorable...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If a man could mount to Heaven and survey the mighty universe, his admiration of its beauties would be much diminished unless he had someone to share in his pleasure.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For while we are enclosed in these confinements of the body, we perform as a kind of duty the heavy task of necessity; for the soul from heaven has been cast down from its dwelling on high and sunk, as...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child. For what is the worth of human life, unless it is woven into the life of our ancestors by the records of history?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To study philosophy is nothing but to prepare one’s self to die.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Sed nescio quo modo nihil tam absurde dici potest quod non dicatur ab aliquo philosphorum. (There is nothing so absurd but some philosopher has said it.)

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Opinionum enim commenta delet dies; naturæ judicia confirmat. Time destroys the groundless conceits of men; it confirms decisions founded on reality.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

O tempora! O mores! O what times (are these)! what morals!

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The searching-out and thorough investigation of truth ought to be the primary study of man.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Man's best support is a very dear friend.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No one could ever meet death for his country without the hope of immortality.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

"What greater gift can we offer the republic than to teach and instruct our youth?"

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The first bond of society is the marriage tie; the next our children; then the whole family of our house, and all things in common.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To freemen, threats are impotent.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For surely to be wise is the most desirable thing in all the world.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A perverse temper and fretful disposition will make any state of life whatsoever unhappy.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I do not understand what the man who is happy wants in order to be happier.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Who does not know that the first law of historical writing is the truth.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

While the sick man has life, there is hope.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The hope of impunity is the greatest inducement to do wrong.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Not only is there an art in knowing a thing, but also a certain art in teaching it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Every one is least known to himself, and it is very difficult for a man to know himself.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Not to know what happened before one was born is always to be a child.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nature has lent us life at interest, like money, and has fixed no day for its payment.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No one has lived a short life who has performed its duties with unblemished character.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The First Bond of Society is Marriage.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Frugality includes all the other virtues.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Quo usque tandem abutere, Catilina, patientia nostra? In heaven's name,Catiline, how long will you abuse ourpatience?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Patria est communis omnium parens. Our country is the common parent of all.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Peace is freedom in tranquility.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Leisure consists in all those virtuous activities by which a man grows morally, intellectually, and spiritually. It is that which makes a life worth living.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If the soul has food for study and learning, nothing is more delightful than an old age of leisure.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To those who are engaged in commercial dealings, justice is indispensable for the conduct of business.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If we are forced, at every hour, to watch or listen to horrible events, this constant stream of ghastly impressions will deprive even the most delicate among us of all respect for humanity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship makes prosperity more brilliant, and lightens adversity by dividing and sharing it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We should be as careful of our words as of our actions.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is virtue, virtue, which both creates and preserves friendship. On it depends harmony of interest, permanence, fidelity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no place more delightful than one's own fireside. Nullus est locus domestica sede jucundior.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

He does not seem to me to be a free man who does not sometimes do nothing.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no grief which time does not lessen and soften.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Let war yield to peace, laurels to paeans.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Lay down this rule of friendship: neither ask nor consent to do what is wrong. The plea, 'for friendship's sake,' is a discreditable one, and should not be admitted for a moment. We should ask from friends...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The budget should be balanced, the treasury refilled, public debt reduced, the arrogance of officialdom tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands curtailed, lest Rome become bankrupt.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I am never less alone than when alone.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

This is our special duty, that if anyone specially needs our help, we should give him such help to the utmost of our power.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The foundation of justice is good faith.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If we lose affection and kindliness from our life: we lose all that gives it charm.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

When they remain silent, they cry out.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

After victory, you have more enemies.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I look upon the pleasure we take in a garden as one of the most innocent delights in human life.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I look upon the pleasure which we take in a garden as one of the most innocent delights in human life. . . It gives us a great insight into the contrivance and wisdom of Nature, and suggests innumerable...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I hope that the memory of our friendship will be everlasting.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Fortune, not wisdom, rules lives.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Always the same thing.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no fortune so strong that money cannot take it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Knowledge which is divorced from justice, may be called cunning rather than wisdom.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We don't believe a liar even when he tells the truth.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Courage is virtue which champions the cause of right.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

By doubting we come at truth.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A life of peace, purity and refinement leads to a calm and untroubled old age.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Let us drink for the replenishment of our strength, not for our sorrow

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No liberal man would impute a charge of unsteadiness to another for having changed his opinion.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Study carefully, the character of the one you recommend, lest their misconduct bring you shame.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no duty more obligatory than the repayment of kindness.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

An intemperate, disorderly youth will bring to old age, a feeble and worn-out body.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I know not any season of life that is past more agreeably than virtuous old age.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Rashness attends youth, as prudence does old age.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The beginnings of all things are small.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The man who commands efficiently must have obeyed others in the past, and the man who obeys dutifully is worthy of someday being a commander.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Never can custom conquer nature, for she is ever unconquered.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Should this my firm persuasion of the soul's immortality prove to be a mere delusion, it is at least a pleasing delusion, and I will cherish it to my last breath.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The greatest incitement to guilt is the hope of sinning with impunity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

History is the witness of the times, the light of truth, the life of memory, the teacher of life, the messenger of antiquity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Justice is the crowning glory of the virtues.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is a difference between justice and consideration in one's relations to one's fellow men. It is the function of justice not to do wrong to one's fellow men of considerateness, not to wound their...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Not to have knowledge of what happened before you were born is to be condemned to live as a child.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is not only arrogant, but it is profligate, for a man to disregard the world's opinion of himself.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The name of peace is sweet and the thing itself good, but between peace and slavery there is the greatest difference.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The contemplation of celestial things will make a man both speak and think more sublimely and magnificently when he descends to human affairs.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The spirit is the true self, not that physical figure which can be pointed out by your finger.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No phase of life, whether public or private, can be free from duty.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

He removes the greatest ornament of friendship who takes away from it respect.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The proof of a well-trained mind is that it rejoices in which is good and grieves at the opposite.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Every stage of human life, except the last, is marked out by certain and defined limits; old age alone has no precise and determinate boundary.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The foolishness of old age does not characterize all who are old, but only the foolish.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no one so old as to not think they may live a day longer.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Old age, especially an honored old age, has so great authority, that this is of more value than all the pleasures of youth.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

"I believe that no characteristic is so distinctively human as the sense of indebtedness we feel, not necessarily for a favor received, but even for the slightest evidence of kindness; and there is nothing...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is exercise alone that supports the spirits, and keeps the mind in vigor.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is as hard for the good to suspect evil, as it is for the bad to suspect good.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Freedom suppressed and again regained bites with keener fangs than freedom never endangered.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

All I can do is to urge on you to regard friendship as the greatest thing in the world; for there is nothing which so fits in with our nature, or is so exactly what we want in prosperity or adversity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Persistence in a single view has never been regarded as a merit in political leaders.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Learning is a kind of natural food for the mind.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no statement so absurd that no philosopher will make it.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Our minds possess by nature an insatiable desire to know the truth.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For hardly any man dances when sober, unless he is insane. Nor does he dance while alone, nor at a respectable and moderate party. Dancing is the final phase of a wild party with fancy decorations and...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship is the only point in human affairs concerning the benefit of which all, with one voice, agree.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship embraces innumerable ends; turn where you will it is ever at your side; no barrier shuts it out; it is never untimely and never in the way.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship is nothing else than entire fellow feeling as to all things human and divine with mutual good-will and affection; and I doubt whether anything better than this, wisdom alone excepted, has been...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For he, indeed, who looks into the face of a friend beholds, as it were, a copy of himself.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is like taking the sun out of the world, to bereave human life of friendship.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is virtue itself that produces and sustains friendship, not without virtue can friendship by any possibility exist.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Friendship is not to be sought for its wages, but because its revenue consists entirely in the love which it implies.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We are not born, we do not live for ourselves alone; our country, our friends, have a share in us.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is not easy to distinguish between true and false affection, unless there occur one of those crises in which, as gold is tried by fire, so a faithful friendship may be tested by danger.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The habit of arguing in support of atheism, whether it be done from conviction or in pretense, is a wicked and impious practice.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In the conduct of almost every affair slowness and procrastination are hateful

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We study history not to be clever in another time, but to be wise always.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The mere act of believing that some wrongful course of action constitutes an advantage is pernicious.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

You will be as much value to others as you have been to yourself.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The spirit is the true self.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Laws are inoperative in war

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Do not hold the delusion that your advancement is accomplished by crushing others.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Art is born of the observation and investigation of nature.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Let us assume that entertainment is the sole end of reading; even so I think you would hold that no mental employment is so broadening to the sympathies or so enlightening to the understanding. Other pursuits...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Constant practice devoted to one subject often outdoes both intelligence and skill. - Assiduus usus uni rei deditus et ingenium et artem saepe vincit

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To live long, live slowly.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

In this statement, my Scipio, I build on your own admirable definition, that there can be no community, properly so called, unless it be regulated by a combination of rights. And by this definition it...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The face is a picture of the mind with the eyes as its interpreter.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We must not say every mistake is a foolish one.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Physicians, when the cause of disease is discovered, consider that the cure is discovered.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Vivere est cogitare. (To think is to live)

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What is dishonorably got, is dishonorably squandered.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Every word that is unnecessary only pours over the side of a brimming mind.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

On the subject of the nature of the gods, the first question is Do the gods exist or do the not? It is difficult you may say to deny that they exist. I would agree if we were arguing the matter in a public...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Even while Jerusalem was standing and the Jews were at peace with us, the practice of their sacred rites was at variance with the glory of our empire, the dignity of our name, the customs of our ancestors.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Trust no one unless you have eaten much salt with him.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

They are eloquent who can speak low things acutely, and of great things with dignity, and of moderate things with temper.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Leisure with dignity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We are obliged to respect, defend and maintain the common bonds of union and fellowship that exist among all members of the human race.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

There is no castle so strong that it cannot be overthrown by money.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Few are those who wish to be endowed with virtue rather than to seem so.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

I prefer the most unfair peace to the most righteous war.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is our own evil thoughts which madden us.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Man is his own worst enemy.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Let our friends perish, provided that our enemies fall at the same time.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To add a library to a house is to give that house a soul.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nature has inclined us to love men.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Hours and days and months and years go by; the past returns no more, and what is to be we cannot know; but whatever the time gives us in which we live, we should therefore be content.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Time obliterates the fictions of opinion and confirms the decisions of nature.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Promises are not to be kept, if the keeping of them would prove harmful to those to whom you have made them.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is the character of a brave and resolute man not to be ruffled by adversity and not to desert his post.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

If a man aspires to the highest place, it is no dishonor to him to halt at the second.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Liberty is rendered even more precious by the recollection of servitude.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A bureaucrat is the most despicable of men, though he is needed as vultures are needed, but one hardly admires vultures whom bureaucrats so strangely resemble. I have yet to meet a bureaucrat who was not...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What is more agreeable than one's home?

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Other relaxations are peculiar to certain times, places and stages of life, but the study of letters is the nourishment of our youth, and the joy of our old age. They throw an additional splendor on prosperity,...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Socrates was the first to call philosophy down from the heavens and to place it in cities, and even to introduce it into homes and compel it to inquire about life and standards and goods and evils.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The aim of justice is to give everyone his due.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is a great thing to know your vices.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The freedom of poetic license.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

What is morally wrong can never be advantageous, even when it enables you to make some gain that you believe to be to your advantage. The mere act of believing that some wrongful course of action constitutes...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Calamus fortior gladio.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

A careful physician . . . before he attempts to administer a remedy to his patient, must investigate not only the malady of the man he wishes to cure, but also his habits when in health, and his physical...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Not to know what has been transacted in former times is to be always a child. If no use is made of the labors of past ages, the world must remain always in the infancy of knowledge.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The science of love is the philosophy of the heart

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Philosophy is true mother of the arts [of science].

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Mathematics is an obscure field, an abstruse science, complicated and exact; yet so many have attained perfection in it that we might conclude almost anyone who seriously applied himself would achieve...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

It is a shameful thing to be weary of inquiry when what we search for is excellent.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The cultivation of the mind is a kind of food supplied for the soul of man.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The Intellect engages us in the pursuit of Truth. The Passions impel us to Action.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The first duty of man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents, and everyone is writing a book.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Books are the food of youth, the delight of old age; the ornament of prosperity, the refuge and comfort of adversity; a delight at home, and no hindrance abroad; companions by night, in traveling, in the...

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

That is probable which for the most part usually comes to pass, or which is a part of the ordinary beliefs of mankind.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The mansion should not be graced by its master, the master should grace the mansion.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Nothing is more noble, nothing more venerable than fidelity.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

To be content with what we possess is the greatest and most secure of riches.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

The men who administer public affairs must first of all see that everyone holds onto what is his, and that private men are never deprived of their goods by public men.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Life is short, but art lives forever.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Guilt is present in the very hesitation, even though the deed be not committed.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For just as some women are said to be handsome though without adornment, so this subtle manner of speech, though lacking in artificial graces, delights us.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

We were born to unite with our fellow men, and to join in community with the human race.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

While all other things are uncertain, evanescent, and ephemeral, virtue alone is fixed with deep roots; it can neither be overthrown by any violence or moved from its place.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

For there is assuredly nothing dearer to a man than wisdom, and though age takes away all else, it undoubtedly brings us that.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

Before beginning, prepare carefully.

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Marcus Tullius Cicero

No sober person dances.

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“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss