Pliny the Elder

Born: 23

Die: August 25, 79

Occupation: Author

Quotes of Pliny the Elder

Pliny the Elder

The agricultural population, says Cato, produces the bravest men, the most valiant soldiers, and a class of citizens the least given of all too evil designs.

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Pliny the Elder

The great business of man is to improve his mind, and govern his manners; all other projects and pursuits, whether in our power to compass or not, are only amusements.

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Pliny the Elder

The happier the moment the shorter.

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Pliny the Elder

Nature has given man no better thing than shortness of life.

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Pliny the Elder

The ancients had little doubt about the true shape of the earth: "It's [the world's] shape has the rounded appearance of a perfect sphere. This is shown first of all by the name of 'orb' which is bestowed...

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Pliny the Elder

Home is where the heart is.

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Pliny the Elder

Hope is the pillar that holds up the world. Hope is the dream of a waking man.

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Pliny the Elder

The depth of darkness to which you can descend and still live is an exact measure of the height to which you can aspire to reach.

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Pliny the Elder

From the end spring new beginnings.

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Pliny the Elder

An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit.

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Pliny the Elder

Grief has limits, whereas apprehension has none. For we grieve only for what we know has happened, but we fear all that possibly may happen.

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Pliny the Elder

Such is the audacity of man, that he hath learned to counterfeit Nature, yea, and is so bold as to challenge her in her work.

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Pliny the Elder

In these matters the only certainty is that nothing is certain.

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Pliny the Elder

It is generally much more shameful to lose a good reputation than never to have acquired it.

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Pliny the Elder

No mortal man, moreover is wise at all moments.

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Pliny the Elder

In comparing various authors with one another, I have discovered that some of the gravest and latest writers have transcribed, word for word, from former works, without making acknowledgment.

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Pliny the Elder

No one is wise at all times.

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Pliny the Elder

Let honor be to us as strong an obligation as necessity is to others.

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Pliny the Elder

The master's eye is the best fertilizer.

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Pliny the Elder

Our civilization depends largely on paper.

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Pliny the Elder

The only thing man knows instinctively is how to weep.

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Pliny the Elder

Contact with [menstrual blood] turns new wine sour, crops touched by it become barren, grafts die, seed in gardens are dried up, the fruit of trees fall off, the edge of steel and the gleam of ivory are...

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Pliny the Elder

Nulla dies sine linea - Not a day without a line.

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Pliny the Elder

Among these things, one thing seems certain - that nothing certain exists and that there is nothing more pitiful or more presumptuous than man.

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Pliny the Elder

There is no book so bad that some good can not be got out of it,

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Pliny the Elder

In wine there is health (In vino sanitas)

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Pliny the Elder

It has become quite a common proverb that in wine there is truth (In Vino Veritas).

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Pliny the Elder

Made up of the glories of the most precious gems, to describe them is a matter of inexpressible difficulty. For there is amongst them the gentler fire of the ruby, there is the rich purple of the amethyst,...

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Pliny the Elder

Honey comes out of the air At early dawn the leaves of trees are found bedewed with honey. Whether this is the perspiration of the sky or a sort of saliva of the stars, or the moisture of the air purging...

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Pliny the Elder

Wine refreshes the stomach, sharpens the appetite, blunts care and sadness, and conduces to slumber.

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Pliny the Elder

The leading distinction of magnets is sex... The kind that is found in Troas is black, and of the female sex, and consequently destitute of attractive power.

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Pliny the Elder

With man, most of his misfortunes are occasioned by man.

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Pliny the Elder

Nature is to be found in her entirety nowhere more than in her smallest creatures.

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Pliny the Elder

The best kind of wine is that which is most pleasant to him who drinks it.

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Pliny the Elder

The enjoyments of this life are not equal to its evils.

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Pliny the Elder

Amid the sufferings of life on earth, suicide is God's best gift to man.

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Pliny the Elder

True glory consists in doing what deserves to be written, and writing what deserves to be read.

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Pliny the Elder

The largest land animal is the elephant, and it is the nearest to man in intelligence: it understands the language of its country and obeys orders, remembers duties that it has been taught, is pleased...

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Pliny the Elder

Suicide is a privilege of man which deity does not possess.

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Pliny the Elder

The lust of avarice as so totally seized upon mankind that their wealth seems rather to possess them than they possess their wealth.

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Pliny the Elder

There is, to be sure, no evil without something good.

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Pliny the Elder

When collapse is imminent, the little rodents flee.

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Pliny the Elder

When a building is about to fall down, all the mice desert it.

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Pliny the Elder

The brain is the highest of the organs in position, and it is protected by the vault of the head; it has no flesh or blood or refuse. It is the citadel of sense-perception.

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Pliny the Elder

....shellfish are the prime cause of the decline of morals and the adaptation of an extravagant lifestyle.

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Pliny the Elder

His only fault is that he has no fault.

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Pliny the Elder

The javelin-snake amphiptere hurls itself from the branches of trees.

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Pliny the Elder

The best plan is to profit by the folly of others.

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Pliny the Elder

The only certainty is uncertainty

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Pliny the Elder

The most disgraceful cause of the scarcity [of remedies] is that even those who know them do not want to point them out, as if they were going to lose what they pass on to others.

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Pliny the Elder

Human nature is fond of novelty.

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Pliny the Elder

In wine, there's truth.

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“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss