Thomas Carlyle

Born: December 4, 1795

Die: February 5, 1881

Occupation: Philosopher

Quotes of Thomas Carlyle

Thomas Carlyle

Give us, O give us the man who sings at his work! Be his occupation what it may, he is equal to any of those who follow the same pursuit in silent sullenness. He will do more in the same time . . . he...

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Thomas Carlyle

Skepticism . . . is not intellectual only it is moral also, a chronic atrophy and disease of the whole soul.

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Thomas Carlyle

Social Science, is not a 'gay science' but rueful, which finds the secret of this universe in 'supply and demand' and reduces the duty of human governors to that of letting men alone. Not a 'gay science',...

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Thomas Carlyle

The word of Mohammad is a voice direct from nature's own heart - all else is wind in comparison.

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Thomas Carlyle

The barrenest of all mortals is the sentimentalist.

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Thomas Carlyle

Why did not somebody teach me the constellations, and make me at home in the starry heavens, which are always overhead, and which I don't half know to this day?

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Thomas Carlyle

A vein of poetry exists in the hearts of all men.

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Thomas Carlyle

Let a man try faithfully, manfully to be right, he will daily grow more and more right. It is at the bottom of the condition on which all men have to cultivate themselves.

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Thomas Carlyle

Popular opinion is the greatest lie in the world.

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Thomas Carlyle

The merit of originality is not novelty; it is sincerity. The believing man is the original man; whatsoever he believes, he believes it for himself, not for another.

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Thomas Carlyle

All greatness is unconscious, or it is little and naught.

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Thomas Carlyle

But the whim we have of happiness is somewhat thus. By certain valuations, and averages, of our own striking, we come upon some sort of average terrestrial lot; this we fancy belongs to us by nature, and...

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Thomas Carlyle

The person who cannot wonder is but a pair of spectacles behind which there is no eye.

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Thomas Carlyle

Men are to be guided only by their self-interests. Good government is a good balancing of these; and, except a keen eye and appetite for self-interest, requires no virtue in any quarter. To both parties...

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Thomas Carlyle

The devil has his elect.

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Thomas Carlyle

The age of miracles is forever here.

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Thomas Carlyle

All work, even cotton-spinning, is noble; work is alone noble.

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Thomas Carlyle

Success in life, in anything, depends upon the number of persons that one can make himself agreeable to.

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Thomas Carlyle

If Jesus Christ were to come today, people would not even crucify him. They would ask him to dinner, and hear what he had to say, and make fun of it.

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Thomas Carlyle

History is a great dust heap.

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Thomas Carlyle

Also, what mountains of dead ashes, wreck and burnt bones, does assiduous pedantry dig up from the past time and name it History.

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Thomas Carlyle

Music is well said to be the speech of angels; in fact, nothing among the utterances allowed to man is felt to be so divine. It brings us near to the infinite.

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Thomas Carlyle

In books lies the soul of the whole Past Time; the articulate audible voice of the Past, when the body and material substance of it has altogether vanished like a dream.

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Thomas Carlyle

That great mystery of TIME, were there no other; the illimitable, silent, never-resting thing called Time, rolling, rushing on, swift, silent, like an all-embracing ocean tide, on which we and all the...

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Thomas Carlyle

If time is precious, no book that will not improve by repeated readings deserves to be read at all.

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Thomas Carlyle

The past is all holy to us; the dead are all holy; even they that were wicked when alive.

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Thomas Carlyle

Pain was not given thee merely to be miserable under; learn from it, turn it to account.

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Thomas Carlyle

One life; a little gleam of Time between two Eternities; no second chance to us for evermore!

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Thomas Carlyle

Men do less than they ought, unless they do all they can.

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Thomas Carlyle

We have not read an author till we have seen his object, whatever it may be, as he saw it.

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Thomas Carlyle

The Christian must be consumed by the conviction of the infinite beauty of holiness and the infinite damnability of sin.

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Thomas Carlyle

The king is the man who can.

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Thomas Carlyle

Tell a person they are brave and you help them become so.

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Thomas Carlyle

A person with a clear purpose will make progress, even on the roughest road. A person with no purpose will make no progress, even on the smoothest road.

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Thomas Carlyle

Experience takes dreadfully high school-wages, but he teaches like no other.

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Thomas Carlyle

Biography is the most universally pleasant and profitable of all reading.

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Thomas Carlyle

What is all knowledge except recorded experience, and a product of history?

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Thomas Carlyle

Universal history, the history of what man has accomplished in this world, is at bottom the History of the Great Men who have worked here.

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Thomas Carlyle

Habit is the deepest law of human nature

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Thomas Carlyle

History is the distillation of rumour.

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Thomas Carlyle

History is the essence of innumerable biographies.

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Thomas Carlyle

O thou that pinest in the imprisonment of the Actual, and criest bitterly to the gods for a kingdom wherein to rule and create, know this for a truth: the thing thou seekest is already here, "here or nowhere,"...

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Thomas Carlyle

What an enormous magnifier is tradition! How a thing grows in the human memory and in the human imagination, when love, worship, and all that lies in the human heart, is there to encourage it

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Thomas Carlyle

In a certain sense all men are historians.

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Thomas Carlyle

History is the new poetry.

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Thomas Carlyle

The battle that never ends is the battle of belief against disbelief

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Thomas Carlyle

Do not be embarrassed by your mistakes. Nothing can teach us better than our understanding of them. This is one of the best ways of self-education.

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Thomas Carlyle

In every object there is inexhaustible meaning; the eye sees in it what the eye brings means of seeing.

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Thomas Carlyle

That there should one man die ignorant who had capacity for knowledge, this I call a tragedy.

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Thomas Carlyle

The deadliest sin were the consciousness of no sin

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Thomas Carlyle

What is all Knowledge too but recorded Experience, and a product of History; of which, therefore, Reasoning and Belief, no less than Action and Passion, are essential materials?

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Thomas Carlyle

Fame is no sure test of merit.

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Thomas Carlyle

There is no life of a man, faithfully recorded, but is a heroic poem of its sort, rhymed or unrhymed.

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Thomas Carlyle

He who has no vision of eternity has no hold on time.

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Thomas Carlyle

Thought, true labor of any kind, highest virtue itself, is it not the daughter of Pain?

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Thomas Carlyle

A person with half volition goes backwards and forwards, but makes no progress on even the smoothest of roads.

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Thomas Carlyle

Let Time and Chance combine, combine! Let Time and Chance combine! The fairest love from heaven above, That love of yours was mine, My Dear! That love of yours was mine.

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Thomas Carlyle

In every object there is inexhaustible meaning.

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Thomas Carlyle

A force as of madness in the hands of reason has done all that was ever done in the world.

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Thomas Carlyle

Nothing stops the man who desires to achieve. Every obstacle is simply a course to develop his achievement muscle. It's a strengthening of his powers of accomplishment.

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Thomas Carlyle

There is so much data available to us, but most data won't help us succeed.

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Thomas Carlyle

If you are looking at data over and over you better be taking away valuable insight every time. If you are constantly looking at data that isn't leading to strategic action stop wasting your time and look...

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Thomas Carlyle

Poetry, therefore, we will call Musical Thought.

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Thomas Carlyle

The suffering man ought really to consume his own smoke; there is no good in emitting smoke till you have made it into fire.

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Thomas Carlyle

The eternal stars shine out as soon as it is dark enough.

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Thomas Carlyle

Intellect is the soul of man, the only immortal part of him.

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Thomas Carlyle

A man's religion consists, not of the many things he is in doubt of and tries to believe, but of the few he is assured of and has no need of effort for believing.

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Thomas Carlyle

No iron chain, or outward force of any kind, could ever compel the soul of man to believe or to disbelieve: it is his own indefeasible light, that judgment of his; he will reign and believe there by the...

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Thomas Carlyle

In idleness there is a perpetual despair.

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Thomas Carlyle

Men's hearts ought not to be set against one another, but set with one another and all against evil only.

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Thomas Carlyle

What is nature? Art thou not the living government of God? O Heaven, is it in very deed He then that ever speaks through thee, that lives and loves in thee, that lives and loves in me?

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Thomas Carlyle

Society is founded upon Cloth;

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Thomas Carlyle

Why multiply instances? It is written, the Heavens and the Earth shall fade away like a Vesture; which indeed they are: the Time-vesture of the Eternal. Whatsoever sensibly exists, whatsoever represents...

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Thomas Carlyle

Great souls are always loyally submissive, reverent to what is over them: only small mean souls are otherwise.

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Thomas Carlyle

No nobler feeling than this, of admiration for one higher than himself, dwells in the breast of man. It is to this hour, and at all hours, the vivifying influence in man's life.

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Thomas Carlyle

He that has a secret to hide should not only hide it but hide that he has to hide it.

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Thomas Carlyle

A loving heart is the beginning of all knowledge.

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Thomas Carlyle

He who has health, has hope; and he who has hope, has everything.

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Thomas Carlyle

Permanence, perseverance and persistence in spite of all obstacle s, discouragement s, and impossibilities: It is this, that in all things distinguishes the strong soul from the weak.

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Thomas Carlyle

Nothing builds self-esteem and self-confidence like accomplishment.

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Thomas Carlyle

I've got a great ambition to die of exhaustion rather than boredom.

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Thomas Carlyle

A strong mind always hopes, and has always cause to hope.

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Thomas Carlyle

Adversity is the diamond dust Heaven polishes its jewels with.

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Thomas Carlyle

Endurance is patience concentrated.

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Thomas Carlyle

A laugh, to be joyous, must flow from a joyous heart, for without kindness, there can be no true joy.

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Thomas Carlyle

The first duty of man is to conquer fear; he must get rid of it, he cannot act till then.

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Thomas Carlyle

If you look deep enough you will see music; the heart of nature being everywhere music.

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Thomas Carlyle

No pressure, no diamonds.

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Thomas Carlyle

Music is well said to be the speech of angels.

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Thomas Carlyle

Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness.

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Thomas Carlyle

Reform is not pleasant, but grievous; no person can reform themselves without suffering and hard work, how much less a nation.

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Thomas Carlyle

What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books.

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Thomas Carlyle

Silence is more eloquent than words.

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Thomas Carlyle

There are good and bad times, but our mood changes more often than our fortune.

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Thomas Carlyle

A man lives by believing something: not by debating and arguing about many things.

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Thomas Carlyle

Foolish men imagine that because judgment for an evil thing is delayed, there is no justice; but only accident here below. Judgment for an evil thing is many times delayed some day or two, some century...

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Thomas Carlyle

Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand.

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Thomas Carlyle

Of all acts of man repentance is the most divine. The greatest of all faults is to be conscious of none.

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Thomas Carlyle

Every noble work is at first impossible.

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Thomas Carlyle

The work an unknown good man has done is like a vein of water flowing hidden underground, secretly making the ground green.

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Thomas Carlyle

A man cannot make a pair of shoes rightly unless he do it in a devout manner.

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Thomas Carlyle

Imperfection clings to a person, and if they wait till they are brushed off entirely, they would spin for ever on their axis, advancing nowhere.

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Thomas Carlyle

The three great elements of modern civilization, Gun powder, Printing, and the Protestant religion.

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Thomas Carlyle

A man without a goal is like a ship without a rudder.

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Thomas Carlyle

A man willing to work, and unable to find work, is perhaps the saddest sight that fortune's inequality exhibits under this sun.

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Thomas Carlyle

Old age is not a matter for sorrow. It is matter for thanks if we have left our work done behind us.

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Thomas Carlyle

War is a quarrel between two thieves too cowardly to fight their own battle.

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Thomas Carlyle

Conviction is worthless unless it is converted into conduct.

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Thomas Carlyle

If you are ever in doubt as to whether to kiss a pretty girl, always give her the benefit of the doubt.

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Thomas Carlyle

A man's felicity consists not in the outward and visible blessing of fortune, but in the inward and unseen perfections and riches of the mind.

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Thomas Carlyle

Under all speech that is good for anything there lies a silence that is better, Silence is deep as Eternity; speech is shallow as Time.

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Thomas Carlyle

Clever men are good, but they are not the best.

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Thomas Carlyle

Culture is the process by which a person becomes all that they were created capable of being.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is a vain hope to make people happy by politics.

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Thomas Carlyle

Show me the man you honor, and I will know what kind of man you are.

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Thomas Carlyle

Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together.

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Thomas Carlyle

The merit of originality is not novelty; it is sincerity.

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Thomas Carlyle

Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure there is one less rascal in the world.

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Thomas Carlyle

Genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains.

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Thomas Carlyle

I don't pretend to understand the Universe - it's a great deal bigger than I am.

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Thomas Carlyle

If what you have done is unjust, you have not succeeded.

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Thomas Carlyle

Long stormy spring-time, wet contentious April, winter chilling the lap of very May; but at length the season of summer does come.

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Thomas Carlyle

No person is important enough to make me angry.

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Thomas Carlyle

Sarcasm I now see to be, in general, the language of the devil; for which reason I have long since as good as renounced it.

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Thomas Carlyle

Humor has justly been regarded as the finest perfection of poetic genius.

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Thomas Carlyle

In the long-run every Government is the exact symbol of its People, with their wisdom and unwisdom; we have to say, Like People like Government.

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Thomas Carlyle

No great man lives in vain. The history of the world is but the biography of great men.

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Thomas Carlyle

Show me the person you honor, for I know better by that the kind of person you are. For you show me what your idea of humanity is.

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Thomas Carlyle

If there be no enemy there's no fight. If no fight, no victory and if no victory there is no crown.

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Thomas Carlyle

The old cathedrals are good, but the great blue dome that hangs over everything is better.

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Thomas Carlyle

For all right judgment of any man or things it is useful, nay, essential, to see his good qualities before pronouncing on his bad.

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Thomas Carlyle

No man lives without jostling and being jostled; in all ways he has to elbow himself through the world, giving and receiving offence.

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Thomas Carlyle

Doubt, of whatever kind, can be ended by action alone.

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Thomas Carlyle

All that mankind has done, thought or been: it is lying as in magic preservation in the pages of books.

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Thomas Carlyle

He who could foresee affairs three days in advance would be rich for thousands of years.

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Thomas Carlyle

Man is a tool-using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.

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Thomas Carlyle

No ghost was every seen by two pair of eyes.

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Thomas Carlyle

No man who has once heartily and wholly laughed can be altogether irreclaimably bad.

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Thomas Carlyle

The block of granite which was an obstacle in the pathway of the weak, became a stepping-stone in the pathway of the strong.

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Thomas Carlyle

The man of life upright has a guiltless heart, free from all dishonest deeds or thought of vanity.

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Thomas Carlyle

A well-written life is almost as rare as a well-spent one.

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Thomas Carlyle

Conviction never so excellent, is worthless until it coverts itself into conduct.

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Thomas Carlyle

History shows that the majority of people that have done anything great have passed their youth in seclusion.

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Thomas Carlyle

I don't like to talk much with people who always agree with me. It is amusing to coquette with an echo for a little while, but one soon tires of it.

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Thomas Carlyle

In every phenomenon the beginning remains always the most notable moment.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is the heart always that sees, before the head can see.

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Thomas Carlyle

Love is the only game that is not called on account of darkness.

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Thomas Carlyle

Nothing is more terrible than activity without insight.

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Thomas Carlyle

Oh, give us the man who sings at his work.

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Thomas Carlyle

Originality is a thing we constantly clamour for, and constantly quarrel with.

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Thomas Carlyle

The fearful unbelief is unbelief in yourself.

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Thomas Carlyle

Thought is the parent of the deed.

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Thomas Carlyle

A person who is gifted sees the essential point and leaves the rest as surplus.

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Thomas Carlyle

Everywhere in life, the true question is not what we gain, but what we do.

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Thomas Carlyle

Men seldom, or rather never for a length of time and deliberately, rebel against anything that does not deserve rebelling against.

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Thomas Carlyle

No amount of ability is of the slightest avail without honor.

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Thomas Carlyle

Secrecy is the element of all goodness; even virtue, even beauty is mysterious.

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Thomas Carlyle

When the oak is felled the whole forest echoes with it fall, but a hundred acorns are sown in silence by an unnoticed breeze.

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Thomas Carlyle

Wonder is the basis of worship.

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Thomas Carlyle

All great peoples are conservative.

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Thomas Carlyle

Egotism is the source and summary of all faults and miseries.

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Thomas Carlyle

If an eloquent speaker speak not the truth, is there a more horrid kind of object in creation?

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Thomas Carlyle

If you do not wish a man to do a thing, you had better get him to talk about it; for the more men talk, the more likely they are to do nothing else.

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Thomas Carlyle

Nothing that was worthy in the past departs; no truth or goodness realized by man ever dies, or can die.

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Thomas Carlyle

One must verify or expel his doubts, and convert them into the certainty of Yes or NO.

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Thomas Carlyle

Speech is human, silence is divine, yet also brutish and dead: therefore we must learn both arts.

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Thomas Carlyle

Talk that does not end in any kind of action is better suppressed altogether.

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Thomas Carlyle

The real use of gunpowder is to make all men tall.

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Thomas Carlyle

The spiritual is the parent of the practical.

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Thomas Carlyle

The world is a republic of mediocrities, and always was.

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Thomas Carlyle

Be not a slave of words.

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Thomas Carlyle

Every new opinion, at its starting, is precisely in a minority of one.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is a strange trade that of advocacy. Your intellect, your highest heavenly gift is hung up in the shop window like a loaded pistol for sale.

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Thomas Carlyle

No sadder proof can be given by a man of his own littleness than disbelief in great men.

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Thomas Carlyle

Not brute force but only persuasion and faith are the kings of this world.

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Thomas Carlyle

Silence is as deep as eternity, speech a shallow as time.

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Thomas Carlyle

Teach a parrot the terms 'supply and demand' and you've got an economist.

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Thomas Carlyle

The cut of a garment speaks of intellect and talent and the color of temperament and heart.

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Thomas Carlyle

The difference between Socrates and Jesus? The great conscious and the immeasurably great unconscious.

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Thomas Carlyle

The true university of these days is a collection of books.

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Thomas Carlyle

There is a great discovery still to be made in literature, that of paying literary men by the quantity they do not write.

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Thomas Carlyle

To us also, through every star, through every blade of grass, is not God made visible if we will open our minds and our eyes.

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Thomas Carlyle

Weak eyes are fondest of glittering objects.

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Thomas Carlyle

Woe to him that claims obedience when it is not due; woe to him that refuses it when it is.

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Thomas Carlyle

Worship is transcendent wonder.

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Thomas Carlyle

Do the duty which lies nearest to you, the second duty will then become clearer.

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Thomas Carlyle

Imagination is a poor matter when it has to part company with understanding.

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Thomas Carlyle

Isolation is the sum total of wretchedness to a man.

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Thomas Carlyle

Laughter is one of the very privileges of reason, being confined to the human species.

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Thomas Carlyle

Let each become all that he was created capable of being.

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Thomas Carlyle

Love is not altogether a delirium, yet it has many points in common therewith.

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Thomas Carlyle

Man is, properly speaking, based upon hope, he has no other possession but hope; this world of his is emphatically the place of hope.

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Thomas Carlyle

Narrative is linear, but action has breadth and depth as well as height and is solid.

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Thomas Carlyle

Necessity dispenseth with decorum.

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Thomas Carlyle

No iron chain, or outward force of any kind, can ever compel the soul of a person to believe or to disbelieve.

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Thomas Carlyle

No violent extreme endures.

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Thomas Carlyle

Not what I have, but what I do is my kingdom.

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Thomas Carlyle

The courage we desire and prize is not the courage to die decently, but to live manfully.

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Thomas Carlyle

The eye sees what it brings the power to see.

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Thomas Carlyle

The only happiness a brave person ever troubles themselves in asking about, is happiness enough to get their work done.

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Thomas Carlyle

The outer passes away; the innermost is the same yesterday, today, and forever.

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Thomas Carlyle

What you see, but can't see over is as good as infinite.

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Thomas Carlyle

When new turns of behavior cease to appear in the life of the individual, its behavior ceases to be intelligent.

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Thomas Carlyle

Writing is a dreadful labor, yet not so dreadful as Idleness.

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Thomas Carlyle

Youth is to all the glad season of life; but often only by what it hopes, not by what it attains, or what it escapes.

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Thomas Carlyle

Every day that is born into the world comes like a burst of music and rings the whole day through, and you make of it a dance, a dirge, or a life march, as you will.

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Thomas Carlyle

Wondrous is the strength of cheerfulness, and its power of endurance - the cheerful man will do more in the same time, will do it; better, will preserve it longer, than the sad or sullen.

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Thomas Carlyle

This world, after all our science and sciences, is still a miracle; wonderful, inscrutable, magical and more, to whosoever will think of it.

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Thomas Carlyle

True humor springs not more from the head than from the heart. It is not contempt; its essence is love. It issues not in laughter, but in still smiles, which lie far deeper.

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Thomas Carlyle

Everywhere the human soul stands between a hemisphere of light and another of darkness; on the confines of the two everlasting empires, necessity and free will.

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Thomas Carlyle

Good breeding differs, if at all, from high breeding only as it gracefully remembers the rights of others, rather than gracefully insists on its own rights.

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Thomas Carlyle

Man's unhappiness, as I construe, comes of his greatness; it is because there is an Infinite in him, which with all his cunning he cannot quite bury under the Finite.

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Thomas Carlyle

To reform a world, to reform a nation, no wise man will undertake; and all but foolish men know, that the only solid, though a far slower reformation, is what each begins and perfects on himself.

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Thomas Carlyle

I grow daily to honour facts more and more, and theory less and less. A fact, it seems to me, is a great thing; a sentence printed, if not by God, then at least by the Devil.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is a mathematical fact that the casting of this pebble from my hand alters the centre of gravity of the universe.

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Thomas Carlyle

It were a real increase of human happiness, could all young men from the age of nineteen be covered under barrels, or rendered otherwise invisible; and there left to follow their lawful studies and callings,...

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Thomas Carlyle

Silence is the element in which great things fashion themselves together; that at length they may emerge, full-formed and majestic, into the delight of life, which they are thenceforth to rule.

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Thomas Carlyle

Thought once awakened does not again slumber; unfolds itself into a System of Thought; grows, in man after man, generation after generation, - till its full stature is reached, and such System of Thought...

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Thomas Carlyle

Of a truth, men are mystically united: a mystic bond of brotherhood makes all men one.

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Thomas Carlyle

A thought once awakened does not again slumber.

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Thomas Carlyle

Force, force, everywhere force; we ourselves a mysterious force in the centre of that. "There is not a leaf rotting on the highway but has Force in it: how else could it rot?" [As used in his time, by...

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Thomas Carlyle

Properly speaking, all true work is religion.

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Thomas Carlyle

We are not altogether here to tolerate. We are here to resist, to control and vanquish withal.

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Thomas Carlyle

All true work is sacred. In all true work, were it but true hand work, there is something of divineness. Labor, wide as the earth, has its summit in Heaven.

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Thomas Carlyle

Parties on the back of Parties, at war with the world and with each other.

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Thomas Carlyle

Armed Soldier, terrible as Death, relentless as Doom; doing God's judgement on the Enemies of God. It is a phenomenon not of joyful nature; no, but of awful, to be looked at with pious terror and awe.

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Thomas Carlyle

Today is not yesterday: we ourselves change; how can our works and thoughts, if they are always to be the fittest, continue always the same? Change, indeed is painful; yet ever needful; and if memory have...

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Thomas Carlyle

The true past departs not, no truth or goodness realized by man ever dies, or can die; but all is still here, and, recognized or not, lives and works through endless change.

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Thomas Carlyle

By nature man hates change; seldom will he quit his old home till it has actually fallen around his ears.

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Thomas Carlyle

Happy the people whose annals are blank in the history books!

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Thomas Carlyle

No good book, or good thing of any sort, shows its best face at first.

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Thomas Carlyle

Let me have my own way in exactly everything and a sunnier and pleasanter creature does not exist.

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Thomas Carlyle

There can be no acting or doing of any kind till it be recognized that there is a thing to be done; the thing once recognized, doing in a thousand shapes becomes possible.

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Thomas Carlyle

Books are a triviality. Life alone is great.

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Thomas Carlyle

Laissez-faire, supply and demand-one begins to be weary of all that. Leave all to egotism, to ravenous greed of money, of pleasure, of applause-it is the gospel of despair.

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Thomas Carlyle

Once the mind has been expanded by a big idea, it will never go back to its original state.

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Thomas Carlyle

War is a quarrel between two thieves too cowardly to fight their own battle; therefore they take boys from one village and another village, stick them into uniforms, equip them with guns, and let them...

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Thomas Carlyle

Philosophy dwells aloft in the Temple of Science, the divinity of its inmost shrine; her dictates descend among men, but she herself descends not : whoso would behold her must climb with long and laborious...

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Thomas Carlyle

Every noble crown is, and on Earth will forever be, a crown of thorns.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is great, and there is no other greatness-to make one nook of God's Creation more fruitful, better, more worthy of God; to make some human heart a little wiser, manlier, happier-more blessed.

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Thomas Carlyle

Enjoying things which are pleasant; that is not the evil; it is the reducing of our moral self to slavery by them that is.

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Thomas Carlyle

The dead are all holy, even they that were base and wicked while alive. Their baseness and wickedness was not they, was but the heavy and unmanageable environment that lay round them.

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Thomas Carlyle

Every human being has a right to hear what other wise human beings have spoken to him. It is one of the Rights of Men; a very cruel injustice if you deny it to a man!

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Thomas Carlyle

Every man is my superior in that I may learn from him.

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Thomas Carlyle

The Orator persuades and carries all with him, he knows not how; the Rhetorician can prove that he ought to have persuaded and carried all with him.

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Thomas Carlyle

Stop a moment, cease your work, and look around you.

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Thomas Carlyle

Great men are the commissioned guides of mankind, who rule their fellows because they are wiser.

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Thomas Carlyle

Of all the things which man can do or make here below, by far the most momentous, wonderful, and worthy are the things we call books.

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Thomas Carlyle

Life is a series of lessons that have to be understood.

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Thomas Carlyle

The Ideal is in thyself, the impediments too is in thyself.

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Thomas Carlyle

Fame, we may understand, is no sure test of merit, but only a probability of such; it is an accident, not a property of man.

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Thomas Carlyle

Why tell me that a man is a fine speaker, if it is not the truth that he is speaking?

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Thomas Carlyle

If you will believe me, you who are young, yours is the golden season of life. As you have heard it called, so it verily is, the seed-time of life; in which, if you do not sow, or if you sow tares instead...

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Thomas Carlyle

Painful for a person is rebellious independence, only in loving companionship with his associates does a person feel safe: Only in reverently bowing down before the higher does a person feel exalted.

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Thomas Carlyle

On the whole, I would bid you stand up to your work, whatever it may be, and not be afraid of it; not in sorrows or contradictions to yield, but to push on towards the goal.

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Thomas Carlyle

Coining "Dismal Science" as a nickname for Political Economy

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Thomas Carlyle

Respectable Professors of the Dismal Science.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is not a lucky word, this name impossible; no good comes of those who have it so often in their mouths.

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Thomas Carlyle

Trust not the heart of that man for whom old clothes are not venerable.

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Thomas Carlyle

Out of the lowest depths there is a path to the loftiest heights.

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Thomas Carlyle

My whinstone house my castle is, I have my own four walls.

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Thomas Carlyle

One monster there is in the world, the idle man.

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Thomas Carlyle

The greatest mistake is to imagine that we never err.

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Thomas Carlyle

There needs not a great soul to make a hero; there needs a god-created soul which will be true to its origin; that will be a great soul!

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Thomas Carlyle

I have no patience whatever with these gorilla damnifications of humanity.

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Thomas Carlyle

Laws, written, if not on stone tables, yet on the azure of infinitude, in the inner heart of God's creation, certain as life, certain as death, are there, and thou shalt not disobey them.

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Thomas Carlyle

One of the Godlike things of this world is the veneration done to human worth by the hearts of men.

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Thomas Carlyle

The Bible is the truest utterance that ever came by alphabetic letters from the soul of man, through which, as through a window divinely opened, all men can look into the stillness of eternity, and discern...

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Thomas Carlyle

Of our thinking it is but the upper surface that we shape into articulate thought; underneath the region of argument and conscious discourse lies the region of meditation.

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Thomas Carlyle

Rest is for the dead.

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Thomas Carlyle

Of all the paths a man could strike into, there is, at any given moment, a best path .. A thing which, here and now, it were of all things wisest for him to do .. To find this path, and walk in it, is...

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Thomas Carlyle

Who is it that loves me and will love me forever with an affection which no chance, no misery, no crime of mine can do away? It is you, my mother.

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Thomas Carlyle

Government is emphatically a machine: to the discontented a taxing machine, to the contented a machine for securing property.

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Thomas Carlyle

Violence does even justice unjustly.

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Thomas Carlyle

Burke said there were Three Estates in Parliament; but, in the Reporter's gallery yonder, there sat a fourth estate more important far than they all.

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Thomas Carlyle

Laughter is the cipher key wherewith we decipher the whole man

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Thomas Carlyle

The person who cannot laugh is not only ready for treason, and deceptions, their whole life is already a treason and deception.

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Thomas Carlyle

All men, if they work not as in the great taskmaster's eye, will work wrong, and work unhappily for themselves and for you.

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Thomas Carlyle

For the superior morality, of which we hear so much, we too would desire to be thankful: at the same time, it were but blindness to deny that this superior morality is properly rather an inferior criminality,...

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Thomas Carlyle

Clean undeniable right, clear undeniable might: either of these once ascertained puts an end to battle. All battle is a confused experiment to ascertain one and both of these.

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Thomas Carlyle

Have not I myself known five hundred living soldiers sabred into crows' meat for a piece of glazed cotton, which they call their flag; which had you sold it at any market-cross, would not have brought...

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Thomas Carlyle

Of all your troubles, great and small, the greatest are the ones that don't happen at all.

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Thomas Carlyle

Skepticism, as I said, is not intellectual only; it is moral also; a chronic atrophy and disease of the whole soul. A man lives by believing something; not by debating and arguing about many things. A...

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Thomas Carlyle

The hell of these days is the fear of not getting along, especially of not making money.

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Thomas Carlyle

The coldest word was once a glowing new metaphor.

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Thomas Carlyle

The soul gives unity to what it looks at with love.

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Thomas Carlyle

The end of man is action, and not thought, though it be of the noblest.

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Thomas Carlyle

No good book or good thing of any kind shows it best face at first. No the most common quality of in a true work of art that has excellence and depth, is that at first sight it produces a certain disappointment.

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Thomas Carlyle

Democracy will prevail when men believe the vote of Judas as good as that of Jesus Christ.

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Thomas Carlyle

Oh, Heaven, it is mysterious, it is awful to consider that we not only carry a future Ghost within us; but are, in very deed, Ghosts!

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Thomas Carlyle

Friendship, in the old heroic sense of that term, no longer exists. It is in reality no longer expected or recognized as a virtue among men.

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Thomas Carlyle

One is hardly sensible of fatigue while he marches to music.

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Thomas Carlyle

We call it a Society; and go about professing openly the totalest separation, isolation. Our life is not a mutual helpfulness; but rather, cloaked under due laws-of-war, named fair competition and so...

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Thomas Carlyle

No person was every rightly understood until they had been first regarded with a certain feeling, not of tolerance, but of sympathy.

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Thomas Carlyle

Speech is of time, silence is of eternity.

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Thomas Carlyle

The meaning of song goes deep. Who in logical words can explain the effect music has on us? A kind of inarticulate, unfathomable speech, which leads us to the edge of the infinite, and lets us for a moment...

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Thomas Carlyle

The greatest fault is to be conscious of none.

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Thomas Carlyle

A man's perfection is his work.

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Thomas Carlyle

When we can drain the Ocean into mill-ponds, and bottle up the Force of Gravity, to be sold by retail, in gas jars; then may we hope to comprehend the infinitudes of man's soul under formulas of Profit...

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Thomas Carlyle

For suffering and enduring there is no remedy, but striving and doing.

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Thomas Carlyle

Speech is great, but silence is greater.

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Thomas Carlyle

The first sin in our universe was Lucifer's self conceit.

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Thomas Carlyle

All deep things are song. It seems somehow the very central essence of us, song; as if all the rest were but wrappages and hulls!

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Thomas Carlyle

Democracy is, by the nature of it, a self-canceling business: and gives in the long run a net result of zero.

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Thomas Carlyle

Man's Unhappiness... comes of his Greatness; it is because there is an Infinite in him, with which all his cunning he cannot quite bury under the Finite... Try him with half of a Universe, of an Omnipotence,...

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Thomas Carlyle

History is a mighty dramos, enacted upon the theatre of times, with suns for lamps and eternity for a background.

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Thomas Carlyle

I do not believe in the collective wisdom of individual ignorance.

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Thomas Carlyle

That a Parliament, especially a Parliament with Newspaper Reporters firmly established in it, is an entity which by its very nature cannot do work, but can do talk only.

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Thomas Carlyle

A fair day's wages for a fair day's work.

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Thomas Carlyle

All evil is like a nightmare; the instant you stir under it, the evil is gone.

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Thomas Carlyle

My books are friends that never fail me.

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Thomas Carlyle

Stern accuracy in inquiring, bold imagination in describing, these are the cogs on which history soars or flutters and wobbles.

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Thomas Carlyle

Cash-payment never was, or could except for a few years be, the union-bond of man to man. Cash never yet paid one man fully his deserts to another; nor could it, nor can it, now or henceforth to the end...

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Thomas Carlyle

The depth of our despair measures what capability and height of claim we have to hope.

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Thomas Carlyle

Not our logical faculty, but our imaginative one is king over us. I might say, priest and prophet to lead us to heaven-ward, or magician and wizard to lead us hellward.

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Thomas Carlyle

The condition of the most passionate enthusiast is to be preferred over the individual who, because of the fear of making a mistake, won't in the end affirm or deny anything

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Thomas Carlyle

Let one who wants to move and convince others, first be convinced and moved themselves. If a person speaks with genuine earnestness the thoughts, the emotion and the actual condition of their own heart,...

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Thomas Carlyle

Pin your faith to no ones sleeves, haven't you two eyes of your own.

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Thomas Carlyle

Nature alone is antique, and the oldest art a mushroom.

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Thomas Carlyle

The lightning spark of thought generated in the solitary mind awakens its likeness in another mind.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is the first of all problems for a man to find out what kind of work he is to do in this universe.

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Thomas Carlyle

As there is no danger of our becoming, any of us, Mahometans (i.e. Muslim), I mean to say all the good of him I justly can...

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Thomas Carlyle

When Pococke inquired of Grotius, where the proof was of that story of the pigeon, trained to pick peas from Mahomet's (Muhammad's) ear, and pass for an angel dictating to him? Grotius answered that there...

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Thomas Carlyle

A greater number of God's creatures believe in Mahomet's word at this hour than in any other word whatever. Are we to suppose that it was a miserable piece of spiritual legerdemain, this which so many...

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Thomas Carlyle

These Arabs, the man Mahomet, and that one century, - is it not as if a spark had fallen, one spark, on a world of what proves explosive powder, blazes heaven-high from Delhi to Granada! I said, the Great...

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Thomas Carlyle

Without kindness there can be no true joy.

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Thomas Carlyle

A great man shows his greatness by the way he treats little men.

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Thomas Carlyle

If Hero means sincere man, why may not every one of us be a Hero?

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Thomas Carlyle

If a book comes from the heart, it will contrive to reach other hearts; all art and author-craft are of small amount to that.

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Thomas Carlyle

I had a lifelong quarrel with God, but in the end we made up.

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Thomas Carlyle

There are female dandies as well as clothes-wearing men; and the former are as objectionable as the latter.

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Thomas Carlyle

Hardened round us, encasing wholly every notion we form is a wrapping of traditions, hearsay's, and mere words.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is not honest inquiry that makes anarchy; but it is error, insincerity, half belief and untruth that make it.

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Thomas Carlyle

Eternity looks grander and kinder if time grow meaner and more hostile.

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Thomas Carlyle

The authentic insight and experience of any human soul, were it but insight and experience in hewing of wood and drawing of water, is real knowledge, a real possession and acquirement.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is the feeling of injustice that is insupportable to all men.

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Thomas Carlyle

In a different time, in a different place, it is always some other side of our common human nature that has been developing itself. The actual truth is the sum of all these.

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Thomas Carlyle

A sad spectacle. If they be inhabited, what a scope for misery and folly. If they be not inhabited, what a waste of space.

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Thomas Carlyle

All destruction, by violent revolution or however it be, is but new creation on a wider scale.

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Thomas Carlyle

No age seemed the age of romance to itself.

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Thomas Carlyle

Rightly viewed no meanest object is insignificant; all objects are as windows through which the philosophic eye looks into infinitude itself.

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Thomas Carlyle

To know, to get into the truth of anything, is ever a mystic art, of which the best logic's can but babble on the surface.

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Thomas Carlyle

The mystery of a person, indeed, is ever divine to him that has a sense for the godlike.

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Thomas Carlyle

With stupidity and sound digestion, man may front much.

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Thomas Carlyle

Might and right do differ frightfully from hour to hour, but then centuries to try it in, they are found to be identical.

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Thomas Carlyle

A stammering man is never a worthless one. Physiology can tell you why. It is an excess of sensibility to the presence of his fellow creature, that makes him stammer.

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Thomas Carlyle

The crash of the whole solar and stellar systems could only kill you once.

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Thomas Carlyle

Know what thou canst work at, and work at it like a Hercules.

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Thomas Carlyle

True friends, like ivy and the wall Both stand together, and together fall.

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Thomas Carlyle

Instead of saying that man is the creature of circumstance, it would be nearer the mark to say that man is the architect of circumstance.

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Thomas Carlyle

To me the Universe was all void of Life, of Purpose, of Volition, even of Hostility; it was one huge, dead, immeasurable Steam-engine, rolling on, in its dead indifference, to grind me limb from limb....

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Thomas Carlyle

The glory of a workman, still more of a master workman, that he does his work well, ought to be his most precious possession; like the honor of a soldier, dearer to him than life.

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Thomas Carlyle

He who would write heroic poems should make his whole life a heroic poem.

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Thomas Carlyle

Thirty millions, mostly fools.

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Thomas Carlyle

The best effect of any book is that it excites the reader to self activity.

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Thomas Carlyle

The Builder of this Universe was wise, He plann'd all souls, all systems, planets, particles: The Plan He shap'd all Worlds and Æons by, Was-Heavens!-was thy small Nine-and-thirty Articles!

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Thomas Carlyle

There is but one thing without honor, smitten with eternal barrenness, inability to do or to be,-insincerity, unbelief.

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Thomas Carlyle

The Present is the living sum-total of the whole Past.

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Thomas Carlyle

The greatest event for the world is the arrival of a new and wise person.

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Thomas Carlyle

Only the person of worth can recognize the worth in others.

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Thomas Carlyle

Reality, if rightly interpreted, is grander than fiction.

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Thomas Carlyle

The tragedy of life is not so much what men suffer, but rather what they miss.

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Thomas Carlyle

Science must have originated in the feeling that something was wrong.

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Thomas Carlyle

Have a purpose in life, and having it, throw into your work such strength of mind and muscle as God has given you.

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Thomas Carlyle

Even in the meanest sorts of labor, the whole soul of a man is composed into a kind of real harmony the instant he sets himself to work.

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Thomas Carlyle

Song is the heroics of speech.

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Thomas Carlyle

Heroism is the divine relation which, in all times, unites a great man to other men.

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Thomas Carlyle

Over the times thou hast no power. . . . Solely over one man thou hast quite absolute power. Him redeem and make honest.

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Thomas Carlyle

There are but two ways of paying debt: Increase of industry in raising income, increase of thrift in laying out.

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Thomas Carlyle

Variety is the condition of harmony.

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Thomas Carlyle

Virtue is like health: the harmony of the whole man.

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Thomas Carlyle

Wealth of a man is the number of things which he loves and blesses which he is loved and blessed by.

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Thomas Carlyle

He that can work is born to be king of something.

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Thomas Carlyle

A thinking man is the worst enemy the Prince of Darkness can have; every time such an one announces himself, I doubt not there runs a shudder through the nether empire; and new emissaries are trained with...

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Thomas Carlyle

Let him who wants to move and convince others, be first moved and convinced himself.

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Thomas Carlyle

Nine-tenths of the miseries and vices of mankind proceed from idleness.

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Thomas Carlyle

The actual well seen is ideal.

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Thomas Carlyle

Dishonesty is the raw material not of quacks only, but also in great part dupes.

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Thomas Carlyle

Let him who gropes painfully in darkness or uncertain light, and prays vehemently that the dawn may ripen into day, lay this precept well to heart: "Do the duty which lies nearest to thee," which thou...

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Thomas Carlyle

Infinite is the help man can yield to man.

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Thomas Carlyle

The mystical bond of brotherhood makes all men brothers.

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Thomas Carlyle

O poor mortals, how ye make this earth bitter for each other.

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Thomas Carlyle

It is meritorious to insist on forms; religion and all else naturally clothes itself in forms. Everywhere the formed world is the only habitable one.

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Thomas Carlyle

No conquest can ever become permanent which does not show itself beneficial to the conquered as well as to the conquerors.

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Thomas Carlyle

What, in the devil's name, is the use of respectability, with never so many gigs and silver spoons, if thou inwardly art the pitifulness of all men?

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Thomas Carlyle

May blessings be upon the head of Cadmus, the Phoenicians, or whoever it was that invented books.

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Thomas Carlyle

The weakest living creature, by concentrating his powers on a single object, can accomplish something. The strongest, by dispensing his over many, may fail to accomplish anything. The drop, by continually...

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Thomas Carlyle

Wonderful Force of Public Opinion! We must act and walk in all points as it prescribes; follow the traffic it bids us, realize the sum of money, the degree of influence it expects of us, or we shall be...

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Thomas Carlyle

Statistics, one may hope, will improve gradually, and become good for something. Meanwhile, it is to be feared the crabbed satirist was partly right, as things go: "A judicious man," says he, "looks at...

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Thomas Carlyle

History, as it lies at the root of all science, is also the first distinct product of man's spiritual nature, his earliest expression of what may be called thought.

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Thomas Carlyle

Science has done much for us; but it is a poor science that would hide from us the great deep sacred infinitude of Nescience, on which all science swims as a mere superficial film.

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Thomas Carlyle

Action hangs, as it were, dissolved in speech, in thoughts whereof speech is the shadow; and precipitates itself therefrom. The kind of speech in a man betokens the kind of action you will get from him.

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Thomas Carlyle

Fire is the best of servants, but what a master!

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Thomas Carlyle

Neither had Watt of the Steam engine a heroic origin, any kindred with the princes of this world. The princes of this world were shooting their partridges... While this man with blackened fingers, with...

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Thomas Carlyle

The steam-engine I call fire-demon and great; but it is nothing to the invention of fire.

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Thomas Carlyle

Experience of actual fact either teaches fools or abolishes them.

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Thomas Carlyle

The best lesson which we get from the tragedy of Karbala is that Husain and his companions were rigid believers in God. They illustrated that the numerical superiority does not count when it comes to the...

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Thomas Carlyle

Not on morality, but on cookery, let us build our stronghold: there brandishing our frying-pan, as censer, let us offer sweet incense to the Devil, and live at ease on the fat things he has provided for...

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Thomas Carlyle

A witty statesman said, you might prove anything by figures.

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Thomas Carlyle

'Genius' which means transcendent capacity of taking trouble, first of all.

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Thomas Carlyle

A judicious man uses statistics, not to get knowledge, but to save himself from having ignorance foisted upon him.

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Thomas Carlyle

The lies (Western slander) which well-meaning zeal has heaped round this man (Muhammad) are disgraceful to ourselves only.

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Thomas Carlyle

The whole past is the procession of the present.

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Thomas Carlyle

A good book is the purest essence of a human soul.

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Thomas Carlyle

Rich as we are in biography, a well-written life is almost as rare as a well-spent one; and there are certainly many more men whose history deserves to be recorded than persons willing and able to record...

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Thomas Carlyle

Biography is the only true history.

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Thomas Carlyle

The archenemy is the arch stupid!

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Thomas Carlyle

Look to be treated by others as you have treated others.

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Thomas Carlyle

Freedom is the one purport, wisely aimed at, or unwisely, of all man's struggles, toilings and sufferings, in this earth.

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Thomas Carlyle

Contented saturnine human figures, a dozen or so of them, sitting around a large long table...Perfect equality is to be the rule; no rising or notice taken when anybody enters or leaves. Let the entering...

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Thomas Carlyle

Tobacco smoke is the one element in which, by our European manners, men can sit silent together without embarrassment, and where no man is bound to speak one word more than he has actually and veritably...

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Thomas Carlyle

Ill-health, of body or of mind, is defeat. Health alone is victory. Let all men, if they can manage it, contrive to be healthy!

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Thomas Carlyle

Literature is the thought of thinking souls.

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Thomas Carlyle

Love is ever the beginning of knowledge as fire is of light.

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Thomas Carlyle

In books lies the soul fo the whole past time.

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Thomas Carlyle

We call that fire of the black thunder-cloud "electricity," and lecture learnedly about it, and grind the like of it out of glass and silk: but what is it? What made it? Whence comes it? Whither goes it?

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Thomas Carlyle

A man perfects himself by working.

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Thomas Carlyle

In private life I never knew anyone interfere with other people's disputes but he heartily repented of it.

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Thomas Carlyle

The universe is but one vast Symbol of God.

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“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss