Daniel Defoe quote

"As I had once done thus in my breaking away from my Parents, so I could not be content now, but I must go and leave the happy View I had of being a rich and thriving Man in my new Plantation, only to pursue a rash and immoderate Desire of rising faster than the Nature of the Thing admitted; and thus I cast my self down again into the deepest Gulph of human Misery that ever Man fell into, or perhaps could be consistent with Life and a State of Health in the World."

Daniel Defoe

Born: September 13, 1660

Die: April 24, 1731

Occupation: Writer

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More quotes of Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe

Great families of yesterday we show, And lords, whose parents were the Lord knows who.

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Daniel Defoe

Today we love what tomorrow we hate, today we seek what tomorrow we shun, today we desire what tomorrow we fear, nay, even tremble at the apprehensions of.

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Daniel Defoe

I hear much of people's calling out to punish the guilty, but very few are concerned to clear the innocent.

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Daniel Defoe

The height of human wisdom is to bring our tempers down to our circumstances, and to make a calm within, under the weight of the greatest storm without.

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Daniel Defoe

Wherever God erects a house of prayer the Devil always builds a chapel there; And 't will be found, upon examination, the latter has the largest congregation.

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Daniel Defoe

Call upon me in the Day of Trouble, and I will deliver, and thou shalt glorify me...Wait on the Lord, and be of good Cheer, and he shall strengthen thy Heart; wait, I say, on the Lord:' It is impossible...

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Daniel Defoe

All men would be tyrants if they could.

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Daniel Defoe

In trouble to be troubled, Is to have your trouble doubled.

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Daniel Defoe

As covetousness is the root of all evil, so poverty is the worst of all snares.

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Daniel Defoe

Now, said I aloud, My dear Father's Words are come to pass: God's Justice has overtaken me, and I have none to help or hear me: I rejected the Voice of Providence.

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Daniel Defoe

As I had once done thus in my breaking away from my Parents, so I could not be content now, but I must go and leave the happy View I had of being a rich and thriving Man in my new Plantation, only to pursue...

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Daniel Defoe

No shoots, says Friday, no yet, me shoot now, me no kill; me stay, give you one more laugh.

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Daniel Defoe

It happen'd one Day about Noon going towards my Boat, I was exceedingly surpriz'd with the Print of a Man's naked Foot on the Shore.

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Daniel Defoe

Alas the Church of England! What with Popery on one hand, and schismatics on the other, how has she been crucified between two thieves!

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Daniel Defoe

Things as certain as death and taxes, can be more firmly believed.

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Daniel Defoe

Actions receive their tincture from the times, And as they change are virtues made or crimes

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Daniel Defoe

The best of men cannot suspend their fate; The good die early, and the bad die late.

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Daniel Defoe

In trouble to be troubled, Is to have your trouble doubled! [People who get upset and worried at the first sign of misfortune are only making their situation worse and thereby doubling their troubles....

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Daniel Defoe

The Dutch must be understood as they really are, the Middle Persons in Trade, the Factors and Brokers of Europe... they buy to sell again, take in to send out again, and the greatest Part of their vast...

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Daniel Defoe

Self-destruction is the effect of cowardice in the highest extreme.

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Daniel Defoe

It is better to have a lion at the head of an army of sheep, than a sheep at the head of an army of lions.

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Daniel Defoe

All our discontents about what we want appeared to spring from the want of thankfulness for what we have.

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Daniel Defoe

The soul is placed in the body like a rough diamond, and must be polished, or the luster of it will never appear.

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Daniel Defoe

An Englishman will fairly drink as much As will maintain two families of Dutch.

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Daniel Defoe

I have often thought of it as one of the most barbarous customs in the world, considering us as a civilized and a Christian country, that we deny the advantages of learning to women.

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Daniel Defoe

Vice came in always at the door of necessity, not at the door of inclination.

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Daniel Defoe

Nature has left this tincture in the blood, That all men would be tyrants if they could.

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Daniel Defoe

In their religion they are so uneven, That each man goes his own byway to heaven.

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Daniel Defoe

For sudden Joys, like Griefs, confound at first.

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Daniel Defoe

Those people cannot enjoy comfortably what God has given them because they see and covet what He has not given them. All of our discontents for what we want appear to me to spring from want of thankfulness...

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Daniel Defoe

I have since often observed, how incongruous and irrational the common temper of mankind is, especially of youth ... that they are not ashamed to sin, and yet are ashamed to repent; not ashamed of the...

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Daniel Defoe

All the good things of the world are no further good to us than as they are of use; and of all we may heap up we enjoy only as much as we can use, and no more.

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Daniel Defoe

'Tis no sin to cheat the devil.

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Daniel Defoe

...in the course of our lives, the evil which in itself we seek most to shun, and which, when we are fallen into, is the most dreadful to us, is oftentimes the very means or door of our deliverance, by...

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Daniel Defoe

Redemption from sin is greater then redemption from affliction.

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Daniel Defoe

Justice is always violent to the party offending, for every man is innocent in his own eyes.

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Daniel Defoe

And of all plagues with which mankind are curst, Ecclesiastic tyranny's the worst.

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Daniel Defoe

It is never too late to be wise.

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Daniel Defoe

I smil'd to my self at the sight of this money, O drug! said I aloud, what art thou good for? Thou art not worth to me, no not the taking off of the ground, one of those knives is worth all this heap,...

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Daniel Defoe

Thus fear of danger is ten thousand times more terrifying than danger itself when apparent to the eyes ; and we find the burden of anxiety greater, by much, than the evil which we are anxious about : ...

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Daniel Defoe

Thus we never see the true state of our condition till it is illustrated to us by its contraries, nor know how to value what we enjoy, but by the want of it.

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Daniel Defoe

It put me upon reflecting how little repining there would be among mankind at any condition of life, if people would rather compare their condition with those that were worse, in order to be thankful,...

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Daniel Defoe

This grieved me heartily ; and now I saw, though too late, the folly of beginning a work before we count the cost, and before we judge rightly of our own strength to go through with it.

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Daniel Defoe

I learned to look more upon the bright side of my condition, and less upon the dark side, and to consider what I enjoyed, rather than what I wanted : and this gave me sometimes such secret comforts, that...

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Daniel Defoe

These reflections made me very sensible of the goodness of Providence to me, and very thankful for my present condition, with all its hardships and misfortunes ; and this part also I cannot but recommend...

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Daniel Defoe

I know not what to call this, nor will I urge that it is a secret, overruling decree, that hurries us on to be the instruments of our own destruction, even though it be before us, and that we rush upon...

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Daniel Defoe

All evils are to be considered with the good that is in them, and with what worse attends them.

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Daniel Defoe

I could not forbear getting up to the top of a little mountain, and looking out to sea, in hopes of seeing a ship : then fancy that, at a vast distance, I spied a sail, please myself with the hopes of...

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Daniel Defoe

I saw the Cloud, though I did not foresee the Storm.

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Daniel Defoe

He that hath truth on his side is a fool as well as a coward if he is afraid to own it because fo other mens's opinions.

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Daniel Defoe

Tis very strange men should be so fond of being wickeder than they are.

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Daniel Defoe

Expect nothing and you'll always be surprised

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Daniel Defoe

He look'd a little disorder'd, when he said this, but I did not apprehend any thing from it at that time, believing as it us'd to be said, that they who do those things never talk of them; or that they...

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Daniel Defoe

I am giving an account of what was, not of what ought or ought not to be.

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Daniel Defoe

Necessity makes an honest man a knave.

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Daniel Defoe

Not the man in the moon, not the groaning-board, not the speaking of friar Bacon's brazen- head, not the inspiration of mother Shipton, or the miracles of Dr. Faustus, things as certain as death and taxes,...

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Daniel Defoe

And I add this part here, to hint to whoever shall read it, that whenever they come to a true Sense of things, they will find Deliverance from Sin a much greater Blessing than Deliverance from Affliction.

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Daniel Defoe

Pride, the first peer and president of Hell.

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Daniel Defoe

Fear of danger is ten thousand times more terrifying than danger itself.

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Daniel Defoe

I had been tricked once by that Cheat called love, but the Game was over...

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As I had once done thus in my breaking away from my Parents, so I could not be content now, but I must go and leave the happy View I had of being a rich and thriving Man in my new Plantation, only to pursue...

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I suffered no pain, my hunger had taken the edge off; instead I felt pleasantly empty, untouched by everything around me and happy to be unseen by all. I put my legs up on the bench and leaned back, the...

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I knew that I did not have to buy into society's notion that I had to be handsome and healthy to be happy. I was in charge of my "spaceship" and it was my up, my down. I could choose to see this situation...

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Hermann Hesse

What I am in search of is not so much the gratification of a curiosity or a passion for worldly life, but something far less conditional. I do not wish to go out into the world with an insurance policy...

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My mind seems to have become a kind of machine for grinding general laws out of large collections of facts, but why this should have caused the atrophy of that part of the brain that alone on which the...

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Antoine Lavoisier

I have had a fairly long life, above all a very happy one, and I think that I shall be remembered with some regrets and perhaps leave some reputation behind me. What more could I ask? The events in which...

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Carl Lewis

'm so fortunate to have done what I love to do for so long, but the day I retired was one of the best days of my life. Not because I was happy to get away from the sport, but because it was clear in my...

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Charles Kettering

We suffer not from overproduction but from undercirculation. You have heard of technocracy. I wish I had those fellows for my competitors. I'd like to take the automobile it is said they predicted could...

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I wanted to go higher than Rockefeller Center, which was being erected across the street from Saks Fifth Avenue and was going to cut off my view of the sky. . . . Flying got into my soul instantly but...

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Haruki Murakami

We fell silent again. The thing we had shared was nothing more than a fragment of time that had died longe ago.Even so, a faint glimmer of that warm memory still claimed a part of my heart. And when death...

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Kurt Vonnegut

So I went to New York City to be born again. It was and remains easy for most Americans to go somewhere else and start anew. I wasn't like my parents. I didn't have any supposedly sacred piece of land...

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F. Scott Fitzgerald

I had a strong sudden instinct that I must be alone. I didn’t want to see any people at all. I had seen so many people all my life -- I was an average mixer, but more than average in a tendency to identify...

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Jennifer Egan

happened as I listened: I felt pain. Not in my head, not in my arm, not in my leg; everywhere at once. I told myself there was no difference between being “inside” and being “outside,” that it...

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Sophocles

I am the child of Fortune, the giver of good, and I shall not be shamed. She is my mother; my sisters are the Seasons; my rising and my falling match with theirs. Born thus, I ask to be no other man than...

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My pulse whooshed in my ears so fast I could barely hear myself speak. “I only have—” “Two days.” He squeezed my hand. “So what? You can spend them feeling sorry for yourself, or you can let...

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George Muller

I saw more clearly than ever, that the first great and primary business to which I ought to attend every day was, to have my soul happy in the Lord. The first thing to be concerned about was not, how much...

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I picked up a camera because it was my choice of weapons against what I hated most about the universe: racism, intolerance, poverty. I could have just as easily picked up a knife or a gun, like many of...

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Mind you, I have had in my sojourn on earth as good a time of it as any man, so I can speak with some knowledge. A writer in the Manchester Guardian who is unknown to me lately described me as "the richest...

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“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss