William Shakespeare quote

"A Devil, a born Devil on whose nature, nurture can never stick, on whom my pain, humanly taken, all lost, quite lost..."

William Shakespeare

Born: 1564

Die: April 23, 1616

Occupation: Poet

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More quotes of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare

Thus I die. Thus, thus, thus. Now I am dead, Now I am fled, My soul is in the sky. Tongue, lose thy light. Moon take thy flight. Now die, die, die, die.

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William Shakespeare

When truth kills truth, O devilish holy fray!

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William Shakespeare

Out, damned spot! out, I say! One: two: why, then 'tis time to do't. Hell is murky!

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William Shakespeare

My glass shall not persuade me I am old, So long as youth and thou are of one date; But when in thee time's furrows I behold, Then look I death my days should expiate.

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William Shakespeare

ROMEO to BALTHASAR But if thou, jealous, dost return to pry In what I further shall intend to do, By heaven, I will tear thee joint by joint And strew this hungry churchyard with thy limbs: The time and...

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William Shakespeare

But whate'er you are That in this desert inaccessible, Under the shade of melancholy boughs, Lose and neglect the creeping hours of time; If you have ever looked on better days, If ever been where bells...

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William Shakespeare

I have seen better faces in my time Than stands on any shoulder that I see Before me at this instant.

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William Shakespeare

Foul words is but foul wind, and foul wind is but foul breath, and foul breath is noisome; therefore I will depart unkissed.

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William Shakespeare

Night's candles have burned out, and jocund day stands tiptoe on the misty mountaintops." Hope tinged with melancholy - like life.

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William Shakespeare

O, let him pass. He hates him That would upon the rack of this tough world Stretch him out longer.

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William Shakespeare

Hell is empty and all the devils are here.

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William Shakespeare

That man that hath a tongue, I say is no man, if with his tongue he cannot win a woman.

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William Shakespeare

A plague on both your houses.

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William Shakespeare

What are you doing sister? / Killing swine.

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William Shakespeare

Love adds a precious seeing to the eye.

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William Shakespeare

I am indeed not her fool, but her corrupter of words. (Act III, sc. I, 37-38)

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William Shakespeare

You are an alchemist; make gold of that.

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William Shakespeare

That truth should be silent I had almost forgot. (Enobarbus)

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William Shakespeare

For what good turn? Messenger: For the best turn of the bed.

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William Shakespeare

O, how I faint when I of you do write, Knowing a better spirit doth use your name, And in the praise thereof spends all his might To make me tongue-tied speaking of your fame.

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William Shakespeare

Discuss unto me: art thou officer, Or art thou base, common, and popular?

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William Shakespeare

Fall Greeks; fail fame; honour or go or stay; My major vow lies here, this I'll obey.

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William Shakespeare

In thee thy mother dies, our household's name, My death's revenge, thy youth, and England's fame.

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William Shakespeare

I say, without characters, fame lives long.

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William Shakespeare

God send everyone their heart's desire!

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William Shakespeare

I am not of that feather, to shake off my friend when he must need me

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William Shakespeare

To sleep perchance to dream

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William Shakespeare

A good heart is the sun and the moon; or, rather, the sun and not the moon, for it shines bright and never changes.

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William Shakespeare

Well, every one can master a grief but he that has it.

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William Shakespeare

Use every man according to his desert and who should 'scape whipping? Use them after your own honor and dignity, the less they deserve ... the more merit in your bounty.

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William Shakespeare

I will live in thy heart, die in thy lap, and be buried in thy eyes—and moreover, I will go with thee to thy uncle’s.

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William Shakespeare

Mercutio: "If love be rough with you, be rough with love;

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William Shakespeare

Is not the truth the truth?

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William Shakespeare

As there comes light from heaven and words from breath, As there is sense in truth and truth in virtue

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William Shakespeare

Now my charms are all o'erthrown...

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William Shakespeare

Knowing I lov'd my books, he furnish'd me From mine own library with volumes that I prize above my dukedom.

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William Shakespeare

They met so near with their lips that their breaths embraced together.

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William Shakespeare

Young men's love then lies not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes.

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William Shakespeare

In peace there's nothing so becomes a man as modest stillness and humility.

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William Shakespeare

I do profess to be no less than I seem; to serve him truly that will put me in trust: to love him that is honest; to converse with him that is wise, and says little; to fear judgment; to fight when I cannot...

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William Shakespeare

You great benefactors, sprinkle our society with thankfulness. For your own gifts, make yourselves praised:

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William Shakespeare

You, and your lady, Take from my heart all thankfulness!

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William Shakespeare

Blest are those Whose blood and judgment are so well commingled, That they are not a pipe for fortune's finger To sound what stop she please.

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William Shakespeare

O Lord that lends me life, Lend me a heart replete with thankfulness!

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William Shakespeare

To die, is to be banish'd from myself; And Silvia is myself: banish'd from her, Is self from self: a deadly banishment! What light is light, if Silvia be not seen? What joy is joy, if Silvia be not by?...

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William Shakespeare

Sigh no more ladies, sigh no more, men were deceivers ever

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William Shakespeare

I’ll look to like, if looking liking move; But no more deep will I endart mine eye than your consent gives strength to make it fly.

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William Shakespeare

O, swear not by the moon, the fickle moon, the inconstant moon, that monthly changes in her circle orb, Lest that thy love prove likewise variable

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William Shakespeare

For never was a story of more woe than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

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William Shakespeare

For to be wise and love exceeds man's might.

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William Shakespeare

The wind-shak'd surge, with high and monstrous main, Seems to cast water on the burning Bear, And quench the guards of the ever-fixed pole.

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William Shakespeare

There's some ill planet reigns: I must be patient till the heavens look With an aspect more favourable.

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William Shakespeare

I find my zenith doth depend upon A most auspicious star, whose influence If now I court not, but omit, my fortunes Will ever after droop.

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William Shakespeare

Our jovial star reigned at his birth.

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William Shakespeare

From women's eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain and nourish all the world.

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William Shakespeare

Assume a virtue, if you have it not. That monster, custom, who all sense doth eat, Of habits devil, is angel yet in this, That to the use of actions fair and good He likewise gives a frock or livery That...

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William Shakespeare

Affliction is enamoured of thy parts, And thou art wedded to calamity.

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William Shakespeare

The tempter or the tempted, who sins most?

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William Shakespeare

I have no way and therefore want no eyes I stumbled when I saw. Full oft 'tis seen our means secure us, and our mere defects prove our commodities.

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William Shakespeare

I would there were no age between sixteen and three-and-twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest; for there is nothing in the between but getting wenches with child, wronging the ancientry, stealing,...

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William Shakespeare

Ingratitude is monstrous.

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William Shakespeare

Nature does require her time of preservation, which perforce, I her frail son amongst my brethren mortal, must give my attendance to.

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William Shakespeare

He that is proud eats up himself: pride is his own glass, his own trumpet, his own chronicle.

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William Shakespeare

And nothing is, but what is not.

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William Shakespeare

JAQUES: Rosalind is your love's name? ORLANDO: Yes, just. JAQUES: I do not like her name. ORLANDO: There was no thought of pleasing you when she was christened.

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William Shakespeare

We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars; as if we were villians by compulsion.

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William Shakespeare

My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent.

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William Shakespeare

It hurts not the tongue to give fair words.

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William Shakespeare

O coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me!

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William Shakespeare

Thus conscience does make cowards of us all; And thus the native hue of resolution Is slicked o'er with the pale cast of thought

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William Shakespeare

Assume a virtue, if you have it not. That monster, custom, who all sense doth eat; Of habits devil, is angel yet in this.

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William Shakespeare

Until I know this sure uncertainty, I'll entertain the offered fallacy.

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William Shakespeare

If the skin were parchment and the blows you gave were ink, Your own handwriting would tell you what I think.

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William Shakespeare

Glendower: I can call the spirits from the vasty deep. Hotspur: Why, so can I, or so can any man; But will they come, when you do call for them?

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William Shakespeare

I pray you, do not fall in love with me, for I am falser than vows made in wine.

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William Shakespeare

Ay, when fowls have no feathers and fish have no fin.

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William Shakespeare

Since mine own doors refuse to entertain me, I'll knock elsewhere, to see if they'll disdain me

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William Shakespeare

Ill deeds is doubled with an evil word.

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William Shakespeare

If she lives till doomsday, she'll burn a week longer than the whole world.

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William Shakespeare

O, grief hath changed me since you saw me last, And careful hours with Time's deformed hand Have written strange defeatures in my face. But tell me yet, dost thou not know my voice?

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William Shakespeare

We came into the world like brother and brother, And now let's go hand in hand, not one before another.

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William Shakespeare

But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel.

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William Shakespeare

Love is a smoke rais'd with the fume of sighs; being purg'd, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes; being vex'd, a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears; what is it else? A madness most discreet, a choking gall,...

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William Shakespeare

Love all, trust a few, Do wrong to none: be able for thine enemy Rather in power than use; and keep thy friend Under thy own life's key: be check'd for silence, But never tax'd for speech.

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William Shakespeare

For she had eyes and chose me.

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William Shakespeare

My love to thee is sound, sans crack or flaw.

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William Shakespeare

I pray you, in your letters, When you shall these unlucky deeds relate, Speak of me as I am; nothing extenuate, Nor set down aught in malice. Then must you speak Of one that loved not wisely but too well;...

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William Shakespeare

He reads much; He is a great observer and he looks Quite through the deeds of men: he loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony; he hears no music; Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd...

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William Shakespeare

This look of thine will hurl my soul from heaven.

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William Shakespeare

We that are true lovers run into strange capers.

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William Shakespeare

Out of this nettle - danger - we pluck this flower - safety.

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William Shakespeare

And yet,to say the truth, reason and love keep little company together nowadays.

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William Shakespeare

Mine eyes Were not in fault, for she was beautiful; Mine ears, that heard her flattery; nor my heart, That thought her like her seeming. It had been vicious To have mistrusted her.

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William Shakespeare

Nay, do not think I flatter. For what advancement may I hope from thee, That no revenue hast but thy good spirits To feed and clothe thee? Why should the poor be flattered?

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William Shakespeare

If he be so resolved, I can o'ersway him; for he loves to hear That unicorns may be betrayed with trees And bears with glasses, elephants with holes, Lions with toils, and men with flatterers

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William Shakespeare

By God, I cannot flatter, I do defy The tongues of soothers! but a braver place In my heart's love hath no man than yourself. Nay, task me to my word; approve me, lord.

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William Shakespeare

What drink'st thou oft, instead of homage sweet, But poisoned flattery?

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William Shakespeare

Therefore was I created with a stubborn outside, with an aspect of iron, that when I come to woo ladies, I fright them. But, in faith, Kate, the elder I wax, the better I shall appear. My comfort is that...

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William Shakespeare

O that men's ears should be To counsel deaf but not to flattery!

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William Shakespeare

They do not abuse the king that flatter him. For flattery is the bellows blows up sin; The thing the which is flattered, but a spark To which that blast gives heat and stronger glowing;

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William Shakespeare

Take no repulse, whatever she doth say; For 'get you gone,' she doth not mean 'away.' Flatter and praise, commend, extol their graces; Though ne'er so black, say they have angels' faces

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William Shakespeare

it is not enough to speak, but to speak truee

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William Shakespeare

As merry as the day is long.

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William Shakespeare

What light through yonder window breaks?

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William Shakespeare

The barge she sat in, like a burnish'd throne, Burnt on the water.

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William Shakespeare

Of one that lov'd not wisely but too well.

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William Shakespeare

Through tattered clothes great vices do appear; Robes and furred gowns hide all. Plate sin with gold and the strong lance of justice hurtless breaks. Arm it in rags, a pigmy's straw does pierce it.

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William Shakespeare

Women may fail when there is no strength in man

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William Shakespeare

My stars shine darkly over me

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William Shakespeare

Come, Lady, die to live.

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William Shakespeare

I charge thee, hence, and do not haunt me thus.

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William Shakespeare

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?

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William Shakespeare

Hang there like a fruit, my soul, Till the tree die! -Posthumus Leonatus Act V, Scene V

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William Shakespeare

Take pains. Be perfect.

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William Shakespeare

Bassanio: Do all men kill all the things they do not love? Shylock: Hates any man the thing he would not kill? Bassanio: Every offence is not a hate at first.

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William Shakespeare

If there were a sympathy in choice, War, death, or sickness, did lay siege to it, Making it momentary as a sound, Swift as a shadow, short as any dream, Brief as the lightning in the collied night That,...

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William Shakespeare

The prince of darkness is a gentleman!

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William Shakespeare

For as a surfeit of the sweetest things The deepest loathing to the stomach brings, Or as tie heresies that men do leave Are hated most of those they did deceive, So thou, my surfeit and my heresy, Of...

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William Shakespeare

Small things make base men proud.

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William Shakespeare

Being daily swallowed by men's eyes, They surfeited with honey and began To loathe the taste of sweetness, whereof a little More than a little is by much too much. So, when he had occasion to be seen,...

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William Shakespeare

A rarer spirit never Did steer humanity; but you gods will give us Some faults to make us men.

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William Shakespeare

You are not wood, you are not stones, but men.

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William Shakespeare

Just death, kind umpire of men's miseries.

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William Shakespeare

Now my charms are all o'erthrown, And what strength I have's mine own, - Which is most faint: now, 'tis true, I must be here confined by you... But release me from my bands With the help of your good hands:...

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William Shakespeare

The miserable have no other medicine But only hope.

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William Shakespeare

Which can say more than this rich praise, that you alone are you?

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William Shakespeare

Friendship is constant in all other things, save in the office and affairs of love.

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William Shakespeare

Truth is truth to the end of reckoning.

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William Shakespeare

To be now a sensible man, by and by a fool, and presently a beast!

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William Shakespeare

Stars, hide your fires; Let not light see my black and deep desires.

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William Shakespeare

We, ignorant of ourselves, Beg often our own harms, which the wise powers Deny us for our good; so find we profit By losing of our prayers.

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William Shakespeare

"Lawyers Are": Perilous mouths.

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William Shakespeare

Conscience is but a word that cowards use, devised at first to keep the strong in awe

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William Shakespeare

Have more than you show, Speak less than you know.

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William Shakespeare

O Mistress mine, where are you roaming? O, stay and hear; your true love's coming, That can sing both high and low: Trip no further, pretty sweeting; Journeys end in lovers meeting, Every wise man's son...

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William Shakespeare

I have not slept. Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream: The Genius and the mortal instruments Are then in council; and the...

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William Shakespeare

Suffer love! A good ephitet! I do suffer love indeed, for I love thee against my will.

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William Shakespeare

I love you with so much of my heart that none is left to protest.

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William Shakespeare

I understand a fury in your words But not your words.

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William Shakespeare

The devil is a gentleman.

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William Shakespeare

Things sweet to taste prove in digestion sour.

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William Shakespeare

Not all the water in the rough rude sea Can wash the balm from an anointed King;

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William Shakespeare

My dear, dear Lord, The purest treasure mortal times afford Is spotless reputation; that away Men are but gilded loan or painted clay... Mine honor is my life; both grow in one; Take honor from me, and...

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William Shakespeare

Discharge my followers; let them hence away, From Richard's night to Bolingbrooke's fair day.

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William Shakespeare

He that wants money, means, and content is without three good friends.

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William Shakespeare

Foul cankering rust the hidden treasure frets, but gold that's put to use more gold begets.

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William Shakespeare

Gold were as good as twenty orators.

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William Shakespeare

Put forth thy hand, reach at the glorious gold.

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William Shakespeare

More matter with less art.

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William Shakespeare

To me, fair friend, you never can be old, For as you were when first your eye I ey'd, Such seems your beauty still.

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William Shakespeare

the time of life is short; To spend that shortness basely were too long.

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William Shakespeare

Cheerily to sea; the signs of war advance: No king of England, if not king of France

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William Shakespeare

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall with our English dead.

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William Shakespeare

You have witchcraft in your lips, there is more eloquence in a sugar touch of them than in the tongues of the French council; and they should sooner persuade Harry of England than a general petition of...

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William Shakespeare

ROMEO There is thy gold, worse poison to men's souls, Doing more murders in this loathsome world, Than these poor compounds that thou mayst not sell. I sell thee poison; thou hast sold me none. Farewell:...

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William Shakespeare

Proper deformity shows not in the fiend So horrid as in woman.

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William Shakespeare

So sweet was ne'er so fatal. I must weep. But they are creul tears. This sorrow's heavenly; it strikes where it doth love.

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William Shakespeare

But here's the joy: my friend and I are one, Sweet flattery!

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William Shakespeare

It is that fery person for all the orld, as just as you will desire; and seven hundred pounds of moneys, and gold, and silver, is her grandsire upon his death's-bed-Got deliver to a joyful resurrections!

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William Shakespeare

A goodly portly man, i' faith, and a corpulent; of a cheerful look, a pleasing eye, and a most noble carriage; and, as I think, his age some fifty, or, by'r Lady, inclining to threescore; and now I remember...

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William Shakespeare

Right joyous are we to behold your face, Most worthy brother England; fairly met!

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William Shakespeare

My joy is death- Death, at whose name I oft have been afeard, Because I wish'd this world's eternity.

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William Shakespeare

Bring me a constant woman to her husband, One that ne'er dream'd a joy beyond his pleasure, And to that woman, when she has done most, Yet will I add an honour-a great patience.

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William Shakespeare

There's nothing in this world can make me joy.

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William Shakespeare

For here, I hope, begins our lasting joy.

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William Shakespeare

O love, be moderate, allay thy ecstasy, In measure rain thy joy, scant this excess!

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William Shakespeare

My life, my joy, my food, my ail the world!

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William Shakespeare

A ministering angel shall my sister be.

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William Shakespeare

For sorrow ends not, when it seemeth done.

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William Shakespeare

Frailty, thy name is woman!

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William Shakespeare

The icy precepts of respect.

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William Shakespeare

I'll note you in my book of memory.

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William Shakespeare

I hate ingratitude more in a man than lying, vainness, babbling, drunkenness, or any taint of vice whose strong corruption inhabits our frail blood".

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William Shakespeare

The nature of bad news affects the teller.

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William Shakespeare

There's villainous news abroad.

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William Shakespeare

Do you take me for a sponge, my lord? hamlet: Ay, sir; that soaks up the king's countenance, his rewards, his authorities. But such officers do the king best service in the end: he keeps them, like an...

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William Shakespeare

But it is a melancholy of mine own, compounded of many simples, extracted from many objects, and indeed the sundry contemplation of my travels, which, by often rumination, wraps me in the most humorous...

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William Shakespeare

Words are easy, like the wind; Faithful friends are hard to find.

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William Shakespeare

To wilful men, the injuries that they themselves procure must be their schoolmasters.

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William Shakespeare

A table-full of welcome!

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William Shakespeare

To unpathed waters, undreamed shores.

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William Shakespeare

Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.

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William Shakespeare

Benvolio: What sadness lengthens Romeo's hours? Romeo: Not having that, which, having, makes them short.

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William Shakespeare

The will is infinite and the execution confin'd, the desire is boundless and the act a slave to limit.

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William Shakespeare

God shall be my hope, my stay, my guide and lantern to my feet.

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William Shakespeare

What a terrible era in which idiots govern the blind.

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William Shakespeare

All furnished, all in arms; All plum'd like estridges that with the wind Bated like eagles having lately bathed; Glittering in golden coats like images; As full of spirit as the month of May And gorgeous...

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William Shakespeare

I wish my horse had the speed of your tongue.

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William Shakespeare

But till all graces be in one woman, one woman shall not come in my grace. Rich she shall be, that's certain; wise, or I'll none; virtuous, or I'll never cheapen her; fair, or I'll never look on her; mild,...

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William Shakespeare

Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date . . .

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William Shakespeare

Did he so often lodge in open field, In winter's cold and summer's parching heat, To conquer France, his true inheritance?

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William Shakespeare

These are the forgeries of jealousy; And never, since the middle summer's spring, Met we on hill, in dale, forest, or mead, By paved fountain or by rushy brook, Or in the beached margent of the sea, To...

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William Shakespeare

What, with my tongue in your tail? nay, come again, Good Kate; I am a gentleman.

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William Shakespeare

love is blind and lovers cannot see the pretty follies that themselves commit

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William Shakespeare

One pain is lessened by another's anguish.

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William Shakespeare

Pain pays the income of each precious thing.

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William Shakespeare

in that small [time] most greatly lived this star of England: Fortune made his sword, By which the world's best garden he achiev'd And left it to his son imperial lord. Henry the Sixth, in infant bands...

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William Shakespeare

Why, I can smile and murder whiles I smile, And cry 'content' to that which grieves my heart, And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, And frame my face for all occasions

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William Shakespeare

I'll drown more sailors than the mermaid shall; I'll slay more gazers than the basalisks; I'll play the orator as well as Nestor, Decieve more slily that Ulysses could, And like a Sinon, take another Troy....

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William Shakespeare

Shine out fair sun, till I have bought a glass, That I may see my shadow as I pass.

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William Shakespeare

Short summers lightly have a forward spring.

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William Shakespeare

My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain. Perjury, perjury, in the high'st degree; Murder, stern murder in the...

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William Shakespeare

And then he drew a dial from his poke, And looking with lack-lustre eye, Says very wisely, 'It is ten o'clock: Thus we may see', Quoth he, 'how the world wags: 'Tis but an hour ago since it was nine, And...

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William Shakespeare

He hath disgrac'd me and hind'red me half a million; laugh'd at my losses, mock'd at my gains, scorned my nation, thwarted my bargains, cooled my friends, heated my enemies. And what's his reason? I am...

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William Shakespeare

The poorest service is repaid with thanks.

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William Shakespeare

I will do anything ... ere I'll be married to a sponge.

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William Shakespeare

All that glitters is not gold; Often have you heard that told: Many a man his life has sold But my outside to behold: Gilded tombs do worms enfold Had you been as wise as bold, Your in limbs, in judgment...

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William Shakespeare

The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen, man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was.

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William Shakespeare

She's gone. I am abused, and my relief must be to loathe her.

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William Shakespeare

Do as the heavens have done, forget your evil; With them forgive yourself.

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William Shakespeare

Speak comfortable words.

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William Shakespeare

If it were done when 'tis done, then 'twere well. It were done quickly.

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William Shakespeare

Though she be but little, she is fierce!

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William Shakespeare

The good I stand on is my truth and honesty.

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William Shakespeare

The cat will mew, and dog will have his day.

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William Shakespeare

Could beauty, my lord, have better commerce than with honesty?

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William Shakespeare

Tis mad idolatry To make the service greater than the god.

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William Shakespeare

Where the bee sucks, there suck I In the cow-slip's bell i lie There I couch when owls do cry

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William Shakespeare

Who is it that can tell me who I am?

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William Shakespeare

But yet I'll make assurance double sure, and take a bond of fate: thou shalt not live.

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William Shakespeare

Our wills and fates do so contrary run, That our devices still are overthrown; Our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own.

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William Shakespeare

Think you a little din can daunt mine ears? Have I not in my time heard lions roar? Have I not heard the sea, puffed up with winds, Rage like an angry boar chafed with sweat? Have I not heard great ordinance...

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William Shakespeare

Say she rail; why, I'll tell her plain She sings as sweetly as a nightingale. Say that she frown; I'll say she looks as clear As morning roses newly wash'd with dew. Say she be mute and will not speak...

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William Shakespeare

I'll give my jewels for a set of beads, My gorgeous palace for a hermitage, My gay apparel for an almsman's gown, My figured goblets for a dish of wood, My scepter for a palmer's walking staff My subjects...

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William Shakespeare

The silence often of pure innocence persuades when speaking fails.

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William Shakespeare

Wrong hath but wrong, and blame the due of blame.

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William Shakespeare

I hate the murderer, love him murdered.

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William Shakespeare

Ay, but hearken, sir; though the chameleon Love can feed on the air, I am one that am nourished by my victuals, and would fain have meat.

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William Shakespeare

Love bears it out even to the edge of doom.

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William Shakespeare

Time does not have the same appeal for every one

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William Shakespeare

Do you know me, my lord?' Excellent well. You are a fishmonger.

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William Shakespeare

And Caesar shall go forth.

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William Shakespeare

By the apostle Paul, shadows tonight Have struck more terror to the soul of Richard Than can the substance of ten thousand soldiers.

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William Shakespeare

GLOUCESTER: I do not know that Englishman alive With whom my soul is any jot at odds, More than the infant that is born to-night: I thank my God for my humility.

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William Shakespeare

Thou art a soul in bliss; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire; that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.

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William Shakespeare

Well, God's above all; and there be souls must be saved, and there be souls must not be saved.

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William Shakespeare

How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank! Here will we sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears; soft stillness and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony. Sit, Jessica: look, how...

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William Shakespeare

You told a lie, an odious damned lie; Upon my soul, a lie, a wicked lie.

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William Shakespeare

Praising what is lost makes the remembrance dear

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William Shakespeare

You are not worth another word, else I'd call you knave.

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William Shakespeare

He is deformed, crooked, old and sere, Ill-faced, worse bodied, shapeless everywhere; Vicious, ungentle, foolish, blunt, unkind; Stigmatical in making, worse in mind.

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William Shakespeare

Thou whoreson, senseless villain!

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William Shakespeare

Dissembling harlot, thou art false in all!

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William Shakespeare

You abilities are too infant-like for doing much alone.

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William Shakespeare

You wear out a good wholesome forenoon in hearing a cause between an orange wife and a fosset-seller.

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William Shakespeare

For such things as you, I can scarce think there's any, ye're so slight.

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William Shakespeare

There is no more mercy in him than there is milk in a male tiger.

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William Shakespeare

Away! Thou'rt poison to my blood.

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William Shakespeare

You had measured how long a fool you were upon the ground.

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William Shakespeare

They have a plentiful lack of wit.

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William Shakespeare

Take you me for a sponge?

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William Shakespeare

Here, thou incestuous, murderous, damned Dane, Drink off this potion!

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William Shakespeare

Thou hast the most unsavoury similes.

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William Shakespeare

This sanguine coward, this bed-presser, this horseback-breaker, this huge hill of flesh!

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William Shakespeare

'Sblood, you starveling, you elf-skin, you dried neat's tongue, you bull's pizzle, you stock-fish! O for breath to utter what is like thee! you tailor's-yard, you sheath, you bowcase; you vile standing-tuck!

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William Shakespeare

There's no more faith in thee than in a stewed prune.

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William Shakespeare

Hang him, swaggering rascal!

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William Shakespeare

I scorn you, scurvy companion.

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William Shakespeare

Away, you mouldy rogue, away!

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William Shakespeare

Away, you cut-purse rascal! you filthy bung, away! By this wine, I'll thrust my knife in your mouldy chaps, an you play the saucy cuttle with me. Away, you bottle-ale rascal! you basket-hilt stale juggler,...

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William Shakespeare

O braggart vile and damned furious wight!

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William Shakespeare

Avaunt, you cullions!

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William Shakespeare

Such antics do not amount to a man.

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William Shakespeare

He is white-livered and red-faced.

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William Shakespeare

They were devils incarnate.

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William Shakespeare

They are hare-brain'd slaves.

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William Shakespeare

Take her away; for she hath lived too long, To fill the world with vicious qualities.

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William Shakespeare

I had rather chop this hand off at a blow, And with the other fling it at thy face.

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William Shakespeare

Teeth hadst thou in thy head when thou wast born, To signify thou camest to bite the world.

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William Shakespeare

I can see his pride Peep through each part of him.

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William Shakespeare

No man's pie is freed From his ambitious finger.

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William Shakespeare

You are strangely troublesome.

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William Shakespeare

Thou whoreson zed! thou unnecessary letter!

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William Shakespeare

O you beast! I'll so maul you and your toasting-iron, That you shall think the devil is come from hell.

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William Shakespeare

You are a tedious fool.

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William Shakespeare

O faithless coward! O dishonest wretch! Wilt thou be made a man out of my vice?

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William Shakespeare

Some report a sea-maid spawn'd him; some that he was begot between two stock-fishes. But it is certain that when he makes water his urine is congealed ice.

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William Shakespeare

A very scurvy fellow.

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William Shakespeare

Thou art a Castilian King urinal!

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William Shakespeare

Vile worm, thou wast o'erlook'd even in thy birth.

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William Shakespeare

I wonder that you will still be talking. Nobody marks you.

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William Shakespeare

My cousin's a fool, and thou art another.

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William Shakespeare

Men from children nothing differ.

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William Shakespeare

Heaven truly knows that thou art false as hell.

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William Shakespeare

They are fairies; he that speaks to them shall die. I'll wink and couch; no man their works must eye.

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William Shakespeare

Thy food is such As hath been belch'd on by infected lungs.

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William Shakespeare

Set your heart at rest. The fairyland buys not the child of me.

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William Shakespeare

Thou lump of foul deformity!

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William Shakespeare

Thou unfit for any place but hell.

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William Shakespeare

A knot you are of damned bloodsuckers.

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William Shakespeare

You peasant swain! You whoreson malt-horse drudge!

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William Shakespeare

I shall laugh myself to death at this puppy-headed monster!

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William Shakespeare

Why, thou deboshed fish thou...Wilt thou tell a monstrous lie, being but half a fish and half a monster?

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William Shakespeare

Why, this hath not a finger's dignity.

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William Shakespeare

I think thy horse will sooner con an oration than thou learn a prayer without book.

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William Shakespeare

Thou sodden-witted lord! thou hast no more brain than I have in mine elbows.

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William Shakespeare

A fusty nut with no kernel.

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William Shakespeare

Go hang yourself, you naughty mocking uncle!

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William Shakespeare

Tis the times' plague, when madmen lead the blind.

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William Shakespeare

The setting sun, and the music at the close, As the last taste of sweets, is sweetest last, Writ in rememberance more than long things past.

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William Shakespeare

Delivers in such apt and gracious words that aged ears play truant at his tales; And younger hearings are quite ravished; So sweet and voluble is his discourse.

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William Shakespeare

Romans, countrymen, and lovers, hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear.

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William Shakespeare

And in some perfumes there is more delight than in the breath that from my mistress reeks. I love to hear her speak, yet well I know that music hath a far more pleasing sound.

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William Shakespeare

A jest's prosperity lies in the ear Of him that hears it, never in the tongue Of him that makes it.

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William Shakespeare

To lapse in fulness Is sorer than to lie for need, and falsehood Is worse in kings than beggars.

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William Shakespeare

Where is Polonius? HAMLET In heaven. Send hither to see. If your messenger find him not there, seek him i' th' other place yourself. But if indeed you find him not within this month, you shall nose him...

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William Shakespeare

To show our simple skill, That is the true beginning of our end.

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William Shakespeare

What's gone, and what's past help, Should be past grief.

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William Shakespeare

The horn, the horn, the lusty horn Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.

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William Shakespeare

Take all the swift advantage of the hours.

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William Shakespeare

We bring forth weeds when our quick minds lie still.

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William Shakespeare

Ring the alarum-bell! Blow, wind! come, wrack! At least we'll die with harness on our back.

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William Shakespeare

Help, master, help! here's a fish hangs in the net, like a poor man's right in the law; 'twill hardly come out.

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William Shakespeare

Here come the lovers, full of joy and mirth.— Joy, gentle friends! joy and fresh days of love Accompany your hearts!

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William Shakespeare

O, call back yesterday, bid time return

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William Shakespeare

Oft expectation fails, and most oft there where most it promises; and oft it hits where hope is coldest, and despair most fits.

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William Shakespeare

Why, all delights are vain; but that most vain, Which, with pain purchas'd, doth inherit pain.

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William Shakespeare

Nothing 'gainst Times scythe can make defence.

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William Shakespeare

You taught me language, and my profit on't / Is, I know how to curse

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William Shakespeare

Ruin has taught me to ruminate, That Time will come and take my love away. This thought is as a death, which cannot choose But weep to have that which it fears to lose.

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William Shakespeare

Short time seems long in sorrow's sharp sustaining.

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William Shakespeare

The extreme parts of time extremely forms all causes to the purpose of his speed.

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William Shakespeare

The time is out of joint : O cursed spite, that ever I was born to set it right!

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William Shakespeare

The whirligig of time brings in his revenges.

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William Shakespeare

Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back Wherein he puts alms for oblivion, A great-sized monster of ingratitudes: Those scraps are good deeds past, which are devour'd As fast as they are made,...

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William Shakespeare

Time is like a fashionable host That slightly shakes his parting guest by the hand, And with his arm outstretch'd, as he would fly, Grasps in the comer.

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William Shakespeare

Time's the king of men; he's both their parent, and he is their grave, and gives them what he will, not what they crave.

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William Shakespeare

Defer no time, delays have dangerous ends.

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William Shakespeare

I may chance have some odd quirks and remnants of wit broken on me, because I have railed so long against marriage: but doth not the appetite alter? a man loves the meat in his youth that he cannot endure...

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William Shakespeare

And when love speaks, the voice of all the gods makes Heaven drowsy with the harmony.

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William Shakespeare

Time ... thou ceaseless lackey to eternity.

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William Shakespeare

I praise God for you, sir: your reasons at dinner have been sharp and sententious; pleasant without scurrility, witty without affectation, audacious without impudency, learned without opinion, and strange...

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William Shakespeare

Time be thine, And thy best graces spend it at thy will.

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William Shakespeare

When you fear a foe, fear crushes your strength; and this weakness gives strength to your opponents.

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William Shakespeare

Make use of time, let not advantage slip.

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William Shakespeare

It is to be all made of fantasy, All made of passion and all made of wishes, All adoration, duty, and observance, All humbleness, all patience and impatience, All purity, all trial, all observance

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William Shakespeare

Let's take the instant by the forward top; For we are old, and on our quick'st decrees The inaudible and noiseless foot of Time Steals ere we can effect them.

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William Shakespeare

And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye, Says very wisely, "It is ten o'clock: Thus we may see," quoth he, "how the world wags."

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William Shakespeare

Time travels in divers paces with divers persons. I'll tell you who Time ambles withal, who Time trots withal, who Time gallops withal, and who he stands still withal.

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William Shakespeare

Time is the old justice that examines all such offenders, and let Time try.

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William Shakespeare

There's a time for all things.

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William Shakespeare

The time is out of joint.

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William Shakespeare

Time, that takes survey of all the world, Must have a stop.

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William Shakespeare

See the minutes, how they run, How many make the hour full complete; How many hours bring about the day; How many days will finish up the year; How many years a mortal man may live.

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William Shakespeare

So many hours must I take my rest; So many hours must I contemplate.

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William Shakespeare

Minutes, hours, days, months, and years, Pass'd over to the end they were created, Would bring white hairs unto a quiet grave. Ah, what a life were this!

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William Shakespeare

We should hold day with the Antipodes, If you would walk in absence of the sun.

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William Shakespeare

Beauty, wit, High birth, vigour of bone, desert in service, Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all To envious and calumniating time.

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William Shakespeare

The end crowns all, And that old common arbitrator, Time, Will one day end it.

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William Shakespeare

Time is the nurse and breeder of all good.

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William Shakespeare

Make use of time, let not advantage slip; Beauty within itself should not be wasted: Fair flowers that are not gather'd in their prime Rot and consume themselves in little time.

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William Shakespeare

Yet, do thy worst, old Time; despite thy wrong, My love shall in my verse ever live young.

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William Shakespeare

Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth And delves the parallels in beauty's brow.

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William Shakespeare

For some must watch, while some must sleep So runs the world away

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William Shakespeare

I love thee, I love thee with a love that shall not die. Till the sun grows cold and the stars grow old.

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William Shakespeare

Your lordship, though not clean past your youth, have yet some smack of age in you, some relish of the saltiness of time.

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William Shakespeare

Appetite, a universal wolf.

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William Shakespeare

We have seen better days.

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William Shakespeare

Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty; for in my youth I never did apply hot and rebellious liquors in my blood; and did not, with unbashful forehead, woo the means of weakness and debility: therefore...

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William Shakespeare

My age is as a lusty winter, frosty but kindly.

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William Shakespeare

Youth is full of sport, age's breath is short; youth is nimble, age is lame; Youth is hot and bold, age is weak and cold; Youth is wild, and age is tame.

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William Shakespeare

I have lived long enough. My way of life is to fall into the sere, the yellow leaf, and that which should accompany old age, as honor, love, obedience, troops of friends I must not look to have.

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William Shakespeare

Have you not a moist eye, a dry hand, a yellow cheek, a white beard, a decreasing leg, an increasing belly? Is not your voice broken, your wind short, your chin double, your wit single, and every part...

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William Shakespeare

Do you set down your name in the scroll of youth, that are written down old with all the characters of age?

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William Shakespeare

What is the city but the people?

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William Shakespeare

Courage and comfort, all shall yet go well

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William Shakespeare

Never shame to hear what you have nobly done

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William Shakespeare

Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises, Sounds, and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not. Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments Will hum about mine ears; and sometime voices, That, if I then...

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William Shakespeare

Many strokes, though with a little axe, hew down and fell the hardest-timber'd oak.

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William Shakespeare

Much rain wears the marble.

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William Shakespeare

O, speak again, bright angel! for thou art As glorious to this night, being o'er my head As is a winged messenger of heaven

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William Shakespeare

This day's black fate on more days doth depend; This but begins the woe, others must end.

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William Shakespeare

Time's glory is to command contending kings, To unmask falsehood, and bring truth to light.

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William Shakespeare

I do desire we may be better strangers.

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William Shakespeare

If [God] send me no husband, for the which blessing I am at him upon my knees every morning and evening ...

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William Shakespeare

Yes, faith; it is my cousin's duty to make curtsy and say 'Father, as it please you.' But yet for all that, cousin, let him be a handsome fellow, or else make another curtsy and say 'Father, as it please...

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William Shakespeare

LEONATO Well, niece, I hope to see you one day fitted with a husband. BEATRICE Not till God make men of some other metal than earth. Would it not grieve a woman to be overmastered with a pierce of valiant...

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William Shakespeare

DON PEDRO Come, lady, come; you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick. BEATRICE Indeed, my lord, he lent it me awhile; and I gave him use for it, a double heart for his single one: marry, once before...

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William Shakespeare

Time goes on crutches till love have all his rites.

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William Shakespeare

So may the outward shows be least themselves: The world is still deceived with ornament. In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt, But, being seasoned with a gracious voice, Obscures the show of evil?...

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William Shakespeare

When you depart from me sorrow abides and happiness takes his leave.

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William Shakespeare

O, teach me how you look, and with what art You sway the motion of Demetrius' heart."-Helena

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William Shakespeare

thy wit is a very bitter sweeting; it is a most sharp sauce.

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William Shakespeare

Time travels at different speeds for different people. I can tell you who time strolls for, who it trots for, who it gallops for, and who it stops cold for.

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William Shakespeare

A glooming peace this morning with it brings; The sun, for sorrow, will not show his head: Go hence, to have more talk of these sad things; Some shall be pardon'd, and some punished: For never was a story...

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William Shakespeare

A blind man can't forget the eyesight he lost, show me any beautiful girl. How can her beauty not remind me of the one whose beauty surpasses hers?

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William Shakespeare

We strut and fret our hour upon the stage and then are no more.

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William Shakespeare

He that sleeps feels not the tooth-ache

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William Shakespeare

Sin from thy lips? O trespass sweetly urged! Give me my sin again.

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William Shakespeare

Master, go on, and I will follow thee To the last gasp with truth and loyalty.

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William Shakespeare

Men at sometime are the masters of their fate.

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William Shakespeare

I can no other answer make, but, thanks, and thanks.

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William Shakespeare

I did never know so full a voice issue from so empty a heart: but the saying is true 'The empty vessel makes the greatest sound'.

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William Shakespeare

All that glisters is not gold; Often have you heard that told: Many a man his life hath sold But my outside to behold: Gilded tombs do worms enfold.

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William Shakespeare

Grace and remembrance be to you both.

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William Shakespeare

Honor, riches, marriage-blessing Long continuance, and increasing, Hourly joys be still upon you!

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William Shakespeare

Heaven give you many, many merry days.

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William Shakespeare

Now join hands, and with your hands your hearts.

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William Shakespeare

So, good night unto you all. Give me your hands, if we be friends, and Robin shall restore amends.

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William Shakespeare

Be patient, for the world is broad and wide.

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William Shakespeare

Is not birth, beauty, good shape, discourse, Manhood, learning, gentleness, virtue, youth, liberality, and such like, the spice and salt that season a man

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William Shakespeare

All that glitters is not gold.

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William Shakespeare

O, let me kiss that hand! KING LEAR: Let me wipe it first; it smells of mortality.

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William Shakespeare

Every thing that grows / Holds in perfection but a little moment.

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William Shakespeare

So full of artless jealousy is guilt, It spills itself in fearing to be spilt.

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William Shakespeare

A heaven on earth I have won by wooing thee.

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William Shakespeare

If we are true to ourselves, we can not be false to anyone.

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William Shakespeare

I hold my peace, sir? no; No, I will speak as liberal as the north; Let heaven and men and devils, let them all, All, all, cry shame against me, yet I'll speak.

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William Shakespeare

Put money in thy purse.

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William Shakespeare

It is better to have burnt & lost, then to never have barbecued at all.

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William Shakespeare

To mourn a mischief that is past and gone Is the next way to draw new mischief on.

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William Shakespeare

I can get no remedy against this consumption of the purse: borrowing only lingers and lingers it out, but the disease is incurable.

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William Shakespeare

Love is the greatest of dreams, yet the worst of nightmares.

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William Shakespeare

But men may construe things after their fashion, Clean from the purpose of the things themselves.

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William Shakespeare

Old fashions please me best; I am not so nice To change true rules for odd inventions.

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William Shakespeare

Prophet may you be! If I be false, or swerve a hair from truth, when time is old and hath forgot itself, when waterdrops have worn the stones of Troy, and blind oblivion swallowed cities up, and mighty...

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William Shakespeare

Virtue itself turns vice, being misapplied, And vice sometime by action dignified.

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William Shakespeare

True, I talk of dreams, Which are the children of an idle brain, Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, Which is as thin of substance as the air, And more inconstant than the wind, who woos Even now the frozen...

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William Shakespeare

At Christmas I no more desire a rose Than wish a snow in May's new-fangled mirth; But like of each thing that in season grows.

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William Shakespeare

Seems," madam? Nay, it is; I know not "seems." 'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother, Nor customary suits of solemn black, Nor windy suspiration of forced breath, No, nor the fruitful river in the...

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William Shakespeare

You must not think That we are made of stuff so fat and dull That we can let our beard be shook with danger And think it pastime.

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William Shakespeare

O, the blood more stirs To rouse a lion than to start a hare!

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William Shakespeare

The smallest worm will turn being trodden on, And doves will peck in safeguard of their brood.

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William Shakespeare

Why, courage then! what cannot be avoided 'Twere childish weakness to lament or fear.

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William Shakespeare

We fail! But screw your courage to the sticking-place, And we'll not fail.

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William Shakespeare

By how much unexpected, by so much We must awake endeavour for defence; For courage mounteth with occasion.

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William Shakespeare

He hath borne himself beyond the promise of his age, doing, in the figure of a lamb, the feats of a lion.

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William Shakespeare

The thing of courage As rous'd with rage doth sympathise, And, with an accent tun'd in self-same key, Retorts to chiding fortune.

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William Shakespeare

All things are ready, if our mind be so.

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William Shakespeare

Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead! In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility: But when the blast of war blows...

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William Shakespeare

Awake, dear heart, awake. Thou hast slept well. Awake.

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William Shakespeare

The rain, it raineth every day.

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William Shakespeare

The small amount of foolery wise men have makes a great show.

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William Shakespeare

And nothing can we call our own but death And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones. For God's sake, let us sit upon the ground And tell sad stories of the...

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William Shakespeare

But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we...

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William Shakespeare

But I will be, A bridegroom in my death, and run into't As to a lover's bed.

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William Shakespeare

When I have plucked the rose, I cannot give it vital growth again, It needs must wither. I'll smell it on the tree.

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William Shakespeare

Love's not love When it is mingled with regards that stand Aloof from th' entire point.

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William Shakespeare

Like madness is the glory of life.

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William Shakespeare

Thou and I are too wise to woo peaceably.

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William Shakespeare

Up and down, up and down I will lead them up and down I am feared in field in town Goblin, lead them up and down

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William Shakespeare

The world must be peopled!

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William Shakespeare

Experience is by industry achieved, And perfected by the swift course of time.

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William Shakespeare

Though those that are betray'd Do feel the treason sharply, yet the traitor stands in worse case of woe

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William Shakespeare

Dissembling courtesy! How fine this tyrant can trickle when she wounds!

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William Shakespeare

If thou art rich, thou art poor; for, like an ass, whose back with ingots bows, thou bearest thy heavy riches but a journey, and death unloads thee.

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William Shakespeare

Last scene of all that ends this strange, eventful history, is second childishness and mere oblivion. I am sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

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William Shakespeare

A light heart lives long.

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William Shakespeare

But 'tis common proof, that lowliness is young ambition's ladder, whereto the climber-upward turns his face; but when he once attains the upmost round, he then turns his back, looks in the clouds, scorning...

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William Shakespeare

Make the doors upon a woman's wit, and it will out at the casement; shut that, and 'twill out at the key-hole; stop that, 'twill fly with the smoke out at the chimney.

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William Shakespeare

Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.

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William Shakespeare

You cannot make gross sins look clear: To revenge is no valour, but to bear.

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William Shakespeare

Of all base passions, fear is the most accursed.

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William Shakespeare

I must be cruel only to be kind; Thus bad begins, and worse remains behind.

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William Shakespeare

If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.

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William Shakespeare

If it will feed nothing else, it will feed my revenge.

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William Shakespeare

And where the offense is, let the great axe fall.

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William Shakespeare

The eye sees all, but the mind shows us what we want to see.

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William Shakespeare

'Tis better to be vile than vile esteemed

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William Shakespeare

A king of infinite space

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William Shakespeare

Light, seeking light, doth light of light beguile

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William Shakespeare

Sweet are the uses of adversity

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William Shakespeare

The man that hath no music in himself

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William Shakespeare

The patient must minister to himself

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William Shakespeare

There is a tide in the affairs of men

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William Shakespeare

There was never yet philosopher that could endure the toothache patiently

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William Shakespeare

What a piece of work is a man

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William Shakespeare

Dost thou think, because thou art virtuous, there shall be no more cakes and ale?

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William Shakespeare

Tis a cruelty to load a fallen man.

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William Shakespeare

To move is to stir, and to be valiant is to stand; therefore, if tou art mov'd, thou runst away. (To be angry is to move, to be brave is to stand still. Therefore, if you're angry, you'll run away.)

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William Shakespeare

What if this cursed hand Were thicker than itself with brother's blood Is there not rain enough in the sweet heaves To wash it white as snow?

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William Shakespeare

I pardon him, as God shall pardon me.

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William Shakespeare

Cease thy counsel, for thy words fall into my ears as priceless as water into a seive.

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William Shakespeare

Do all men kill the things they do not love ............ The quality of mercy is not strain'd It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath: it is twice blest It blesseth him that gives...

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William Shakespeare

There is some soul of goodness in things evil, Would men observingly distill it out.

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William Shakespeare

Your tale, sir, would cure deafness.

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William Shakespeare

Now get you to my lady's chamber, and tell her, let her paint an inch thick, to this favour she must come; make her laugh at that.

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William Shakespeare

And oftentimes excusing of a fault Doth make the fault the worse by the excuse, As patches set upon a little breach, Discredit more in hiding of the fault Than did the fault before it was so patch'd.

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William Shakespeare

Your gentleness shall force More than your force move us to gentleness.

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William Shakespeare

Thou weedy elf-skinned canker-blossom!

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William Shakespeare

Thou frothy tickle-brained hedge-pig!

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William Shakespeare

My purpose is, indeed, a horse of that color.

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William Shakespeare

Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you-trippingly on the tongue; but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines. Nor do not saw the air too...

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William Shakespeare

It is not, nor it cannot, come to good, But break, my heart, for I must hold my tongue.

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William Shakespeare

At once, good night- Stand not upon the order of your going, But go at once.

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William Shakespeare

Look, the world's comforter, with weary gait, His day's hot task hath ended in the west: The owl, night's herald, shrieks-'tis very late; The sheep are gone to fold, birds to their nest; And coal-black...

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William Shakespeare

Summer's lease hath all too short a date.

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William Shakespeare

Sit by my side, and let the world slip: we shall ne'er be younger.

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William Shakespeare

Not proud you have, but thankful that you have. Proud can I never be of what I hate, but thankful even for hate that is meant love.

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William Shakespeare

And where two raging fires meet together, they do consume the thing that feeds their fury.

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William Shakespeare

Then to Silvia let us sing that Silvia is excelling. She excels each mortal thing upon the dull earth dwelling.

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William Shakespeare

When workmen strive to do better than well, they do confound their skill in covetousness.

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William Shakespeare

so full of shapes is fancy

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William Shakespeare

Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.

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William Shakespeare

A golden mind stoops not to shows of dross.

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William Shakespeare

See how she leans her cheek upon her hand. O, that I were a glove upon that hand That I might touch that cheek!

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William Shakespeare

Zounds! sir, you are one of those that will not serve God if the devil bid you.

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William Shakespeare

Sometimes we are devils to ourselves When we will tempt the frailty of our powers, Presuming on their changeful potency.

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William Shakespeare

The weight of this sad time we must obey, Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say. The oldest hath borne most: we that are young Shall never see so much, nor live so long.

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William Shakespeare

I have a bone to pick with Fate

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William Shakespeare

Thou seest we are not all alone unhappy: This wide and universal theatre Presents more woeful pageants than the scene Wherein we play in.

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William Shakespeare

How now, wit! Whither wander you?

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William Shakespeare

Music can minister to minds diseased, pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, raze out the written troubles of the brain, and with its sweet oblivious antidote, cleanse the full bosom of all perilous stuff...

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William Shakespeare

Is there no pity sitting in the clouds That sees into the bottom of my grief? O sweet my mother, cast me not away! Delay this marriage for a month, a week, Or if you do not, make the bridal bed In that...

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William Shakespeare

Report of fashions in proud Italy Whose manners still our tardy-apish nation Limps after in base imitation

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William Shakespeare

A very honest woman but something given to lie

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William Shakespeare

Honesty is not the best policy - merely the safest

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William Shakespeare

And makes me poor indeed.

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William Shakespeare

Evermore thanks, the exchequer of the poor

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William Shakespeare

Beggar that I am, I am even poor in thanks

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William Shakespeare

To saucy doubts and fears.

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William Shakespeare

Never, never, never, never, never! Pray you, undo this button.

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William Shakespeare

Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself And falls on the other side

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William Shakespeare

The gallantry of his grief did put me into a towering passion.

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William Shakespeare

Feed on her damask cheek: she pined in thought, And with a green and yellow melancholy She sat like patience on a monument, Smiling at grief

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William Shakespeare

Beauty is bought by judgement of the eye.

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William Shakespeare

Men should be what they seem.

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William Shakespeare

Thou mak'st me merry: I am full of pleasure; let us be jocund

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William Shakespeare

...too much sadness hath congealed your blood,And melancholy is the nurse of frenzy.

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William Shakespeare

Hope is a lover's staff; walk hence with that And manage it against despairing thoughts.

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William Shakespeare

Go, write it in a martial hand; be curst and brief; it is no matter how witty, so it be eloquent and fun of invention: taunt him with the licence of ink: if thou thou'st him some thrice, it shall not be...

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William Shakespeare

Lay not that flattering unction to your soul, That not your trespass but my madness speaks.

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William Shakespeare

There's not the smallest orb which thou behold'st But in his motion like an angel sings.

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William Shakespeare

Thou art a boil, a plague sore, an embossed carbuncle in my corrupted blood.

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William Shakespeare

Their savage eyes turned to a modest gaze by the sweet power of music.

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William Shakespeare

O me, you juggler, you canker-blossom, you thief of love!

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William Shakespeare

Tempt not a desperate man

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William Shakespeare

true apothecary thy drugs art quick

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William Shakespeare

whats here a cup closed in my true loves hand poisin i see hath been his timeless end. oh churl drunk all and left no friendly drop to help me after. i will kiss thy lips some poisin doth hang on them,...

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William Shakespeare

O, she misused me past the endurance of a block.

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William Shakespeare

Moderate lamentation is the right of the dead, excessive grief the enemy to the living.

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William Shakespeare

My affection hath an unknown bottom, like the Bay of Portugal.

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William Shakespeare

If music be the food of love, play on.

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William Shakespeare

Falsehood falsehood cures

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William Shakespeare

My love is deep; the more I give to thee, the more I have, both are infinite.

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William Shakespeare

I drink to the general joy o’ the whole table." Macbeth

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William Shakespeare

Our thoughts are ours, their ends none of our own

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William Shakespeare

Literature is a comprehensive essence of the intellectual life of a nation.

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William Shakespeare

They have been grand-jurymen since before Noah was a sailor

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William Shakespeare

Every fair from fair sometime declines

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William Shakespeare

He's all my exercise, my mirth, my matter.

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William Shakespeare

I had rather be a toad, and live upon the vapor of a dungeon than keep a corner in the thing I love for others uses.

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William Shakespeare

Muster your wits; stand in your own defence...

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William Shakespeare

The native hue of resolution is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought; and enterprises of great pitch and moment, With this regard, their currents turn awry, and lose the name of action.

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William Shakespeare

Or art thou but / A dagger of the mind, a false creation, / Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?

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William Shakespeare

Love sees with the heart and not with mind.

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William Shakespeare

Love's gentle spring doth always fresh remain.

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William Shakespeare

Mercy but murders, pardoning those that kill.

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William Shakespeare

A beggar's book outworths a noble's blood.

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William Shakespeare

Die for adultery! No: The wren goes to't, and the small gilded fly does lecher in my sight

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William Shakespeare

Men's faults do seldom to themselves appear.

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William Shakespeare

Too much to know is to know naught but fame.

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William Shakespeare

Crowns have their compass-length of days their date- Triumphs their tomb-felicity, her fate- Of nought but earth can earth make us partaker, But knowledge makes a king most like his Maker.

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William Shakespeare

He that is robbed, not wanting what is stolen, him not know t, and he's not robbed at all.

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William Shakespeare

All difficulties are easy when they are known.

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William Shakespeare

Wine loved I deeply, dice dearly.

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William Shakespeare

The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together.

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William Shakespeare

Advice is a form of nostalgia, dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the disposal, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it's worth.

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William Shakespeare

O excellent! I love long life better than figs.

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William Shakespeare

And so, from hour to hour, we ripe and ripe. And then, from hour to hour, we rot and rot; And thereby hangs a tale.

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William Shakespeare

Why, what should be the fear? I do not set my life at a pin's fee.

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William Shakespeare

And a man's life's no more than to say "One."

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William Shakespeare

O gentlemen, the time of life is short! To spend that shortness basely were too long, If life did ride upon a dial's point, Still ending at the arrival of an hour.

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William Shakespeare

The sands are number'd that make up my life; Here must I stay, and here my life must end.

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William Shakespeare

I cannot tell what you and other men Think of this life; but, for my single self, I had as lief not be as live to be In awe of such a thing as I myself.

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William Shakespeare

This day I breathed first: time is come round, And where I did begin there shall I end; My life is run his compass.

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William Shakespeare

Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass, Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron, Can be retentive to the strength of spirit; But life, being weary of these worldly bars, Never lacks power...

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William Shakespeare

That but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'ld jump the life to come.

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William Shakespeare

Had I but died an hour before this chance, I had liv'd a blessed time; for, from this instant, There's nothing serious in mortality: All is but toys; renown, and grace is dead; The wine of life is...

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William Shakespeare

So weary with disasters, tugg'd with fortune, That I would set my life on any chance, To mend, or be rid on't.

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William Shakespeare

Reason thus with life: If I do lose thee, I do lose a thing That none but fools would keep.

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William Shakespeare

Her father lov'd me; oft invited me; Still question'd me the story of my life, From year to year, the battles, sieges, fortunes, That I have pass'd.

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William Shakespeare

Truth hath a quiet breast.

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William Shakespeare

O' thinkest thou we shall ever meet again? I doubt it not; and all these woes shall serve For sweet discourses in our times to come.

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William Shakespeare

On a day - alack the day! - Love, whose month is ever May, Spied a blossom passing fair Playing in the wanton air

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William Shakespeare

Were I the Moor I would not be Iago. In following him I follow but myself; Heaven is my judge, not I for love and duty, But seeming so for my peculiar end. For when my outward action doth demonstrate The...

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William Shakespeare

My noble father, I do perceive here a divided duty. To you I am bound for life and education. My life and education both do learn me How to respect you. You are the lord of my duty, I am hitherto your...

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William Shakespeare

Haply for I am black, And have not those soft parts of conversation That chamberers have; or for I am declined Into the vale of years—yet that’s not much— She’s gone. I am abused, and my relief...

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William Shakespeare

Then must you speak Of one that loved not wisely but too well, Of one not easily jealous but, being wrought, Perplexed in the extreme; of one whose hand, Like the base Indian, threw a pearl away Richer...

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William Shakespeare

O, then I see Queen Mab hath been with you. . . . She is the fairies’ midwife, and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate stone On the forefinger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomi...

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William Shakespeare

Oh God! that one might read the book of fate, And see the revolution of the times Make mountains level, and the continent, Weary of solid firmness, melt itself Into the sea.

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William Shakespeare

Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come; Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. If this be error...

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William Shakespeare

Why, what's the matter, That you have such a February face, So full of frost, of storm and cloudiness?

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William Shakespeare

I am one, sir, that comes to tell you your daughter and the Moor are now making the beast with two backs.(IAGO,ActI,SceneI)

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William Shakespeare

My heart is ever at your service.

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William Shakespeare

And teach me how To name the bigger light, and how the less, That burn by day and night ...

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William Shakespeare

Let us not burden our remembrances with a heaviness that's gone.

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William Shakespeare

Madness in great ones must not unwatched go.

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William Shakespeare

This thought is as a death.

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William Shakespeare

For now they kill me with a living death.

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William Shakespeare

Thou detestable maw, thou womb of death.

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William Shakespeare

Death-counterfeiting sleep.

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William Shakespeare

The gloomy shade of death.

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William Shakespeare

What ugly sights of death within mine eyes!

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William Shakespeare

O wretched state! o bosom black as death!

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William Shakespeare

On pain of death, no person be so bold.

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William Shakespeare

Tired with all these, for restful death I cry.

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William Shakespeare

What is thy sentence then but speechless death.

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William Shakespeare

Why, thou owest god a death.

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William Shakespeare

Speak me fair in death.

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William Shakespeare

Let me be boiled to death with melancholy.

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William Shakespeare

Dream on, dream on, of bloody deeds and death.

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William Shakespeare

Whose heart the accustom'd sight of death makes hard.

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William Shakespeare

Thou ominous and fearful owl of death.

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William Shakespeare

Ay, but to die, and go we know not where.

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William Shakespeare

For in that sleep of death what dreams may come.

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William Shakespeare

When that churl Death my bones with dust shall cover.

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William Shakespeare

O Death, made proud with pure and princely beauty!

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William Shakespeare

Though Death be poor, it ends a mortal woe.

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William Shakespeare

So shalt thou feed on Death, that feeds on men.

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William Shakespeare

Death lies on her like an untimely frost.

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William Shakespeare

Death is my son-in-law, death is my heir.

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William Shakespeare

Crack'd in pieces by malignant Death.

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William Shakespeare

Death, not Romeo, take my maidenhead!

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William Shakespeare

Where hateful Death put on his ugliest mask.

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William Shakespeare

When Death doth close his tender dying eyes.

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William Shakespeare

Till our King Henry had shook hands with Death.

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William Shakespeare

The sudden hand of Death close up mine eye!

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William Shakespeare

Unsubstantial Death is amorous.

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William Shakespeare

Death rock me asleep.

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William Shakespeare

Then love-devouring Death do what he dare.

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William Shakespeare

Conversation should be pleasant without scurrility, witty without affectation, free without indecency, learned without conceitedness, novel without falsehood.

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William Shakespeare

Lady, you are the cruel'st she alive If you will lead these graces to the grave And leave the world no copy.

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William Shakespeare

April ... hath put a spirit of youth in everything.

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William Shakespeare

One touch of nature makes the whole world kin.

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William Shakespeare

thou art the best o' the cut-throats

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William Shakespeare

Graze on my lips; and if those hills be dry, stray lower, where the pleasant fountains lie.

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William Shakespeare

The voice of parents is the voice of gods, for to their children they are heaven's lieutenants.

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William Shakespeare

Though patience be a tired mare, yet she will plod.

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William Shakespeare

A high hope for a low heaven: God grant us patience!

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William Shakespeare

Sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.

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William Shakespeare

I do oppose My patience to his fury, and am arm'd To suffer, with a quietness of spirit, The very tyranny and rage of his.

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William Shakespeare

Had it pleas'd heaven To try me with affliction * * * I should have found in some place of my soul A drop of patience.

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William Shakespeare

Like Patience gazing on kings' graves, and smiling Extremity out of act.

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William Shakespeare

He that will have a cake out of the wheat must tarry the grinding.

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William Shakespeare

Who can be patient in extremes?

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William Shakespeare

That which in mean men we entitle patience is pale cold cowardice in noble breasts.

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William Shakespeare

A flock of blessings light upon thy back

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William Shakespeare

A Devil, a born Devil on whose nature, nurture can never stick, on whom my pain, humanly taken, all lost, quite lost...

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William Shakespeare

Who buys a minute's mirth to wail a week? Or sell eternity to get a toy? For one grape who will the vine destroy?

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William Shakespeare

Finish, good lady; the bright day is done, And we are for the Dark.

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William Shakespeare

Is this a vision? Is this a dream? Do I sleep?

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William Shakespeare

And since you know you cannot see yourself, so well as by reflection, I, your glass, will modestly discover to yourself, that of yourself which you yet know not of.

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William Shakespeare

Eternity was in our lips and eyes.

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William Shakespeare

Out of her favour, where I am in love.

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William Shakespeare

Love that we cannot have is the one that lasts the longest,hurts the deepest,but feels the strongest

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William Shakespeare

Tis now the very witching time of night, when churchyards yawn and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world.

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William Shakespeare

Eye of newt, and toe of frog, Wool of bat, and tongue of dog, Adder's fork, and blind-worm's sting, Lizard's leg, and owlet's wing, For a charm of powerful trouble, Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.

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William Shakespeare

Be wary then; best safety lies in fear.

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William Shakespeare

What, my dear Lady Disdain! are you yet living? Beatrice: Is it possible disdain should die while she hath such meet food to feed it as Signior Benedick?

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William Shakespeare

If her breath were as terrible as her terminations, there were no living near her, she would infect to the north star!

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William Shakespeare

Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.

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William Shakespeare

My soul is in the sky.

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William Shakespeare

I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon, Than such a Roman.

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William Shakespeare

A politician... one that would circumvent God.

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William Shakespeare

Get thee a good husband, and use him as he uses thee.

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William Shakespeare

If men could be contented to be what they are, there were no fear in marriage.

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William Shakespeare

The fittest time to corrupt a man's wife is when she's fallen out with her husband.

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William Shakespeare

With mirth in funeral and with dirge in marriage.

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William Shakespeare

The instances that second marriage move Are base respects of thrift, but none of love.

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William Shakespeare

Marriage is a matter of more worth Than to be dealt in by attorneyship.

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William Shakespeare

For what is wedlock forced but a hell, An age of discord and continual strife? Whereas the contrary bringeth bliss, And is a pattern of celestial peace.

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William Shakespeare

Hasty marriage seldom proveth well.

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William Shakespeare

Hanging and wiving goes by destiny.

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William Shakespeare

In love the heavens themselves do guide the state; Money buys lands, and wives are sold by fate.

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William Shakespeare

Thou art sad; get thee a wife, get thee a wife!

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William Shakespeare

The curse of marriage That we can call these delicate creatures ours And not their appetites!

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William Shakespeare

I have thrust myself into this maze, Haply to wive and thrive as best I may.

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William Shakespeare

Thy husband is thy lord, thy life, thy keeper, Thy head, thy sovereign; one that cares for thee, And for thy maintenance commits his body To painful labour both by sea and land, To watch the night...

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William Shakespeare

This is a way to kill a wife with kindness.

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William Shakespeare

I will be master of what is mine own: She is my goods, my chattels; she is my house, My household stuff, my field, my barn, My horse, my ox, my ass, my any thing.

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William Shakespeare

Fools are as like husbands as pilchards are to herrings, the husband's the bigger.

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William Shakespeare

Thou call'st me dog before thou hadst a cause, But since I am a dog, beware my fangs.

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William Shakespeare

When I got enough confidence, the stage was gone. When I was sure of losing, I won. When I needed people the most, they left me. When I learnt to dry my tears, I found a shoulder to cry on. And when I...

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William Shakespeare

I'll go find a shadow, and sigh till he come" (Phebe)

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William Shakespeare

I have very poor and unhappy brains for drinking.

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William Shakespeare

When you do dance, I wish you a wave o' the sea, that you might ever do nothing but that.

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William Shakespeare

More fools know Jack Fool than Jack Fool knows.

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William Shakespeare

But she makes hungry Where she most satisfies...

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William Shakespeare

I care not, a man can die but once; we owe God and death.

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William Shakespeare

The weariest and most loathed worldly life, that age, ache, penury and imprisonment can lay on nature is a paradise, to what we fear of death.

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William Shakespeare

Be still prepared for death: and death or life shall thereby be the sweeter.

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William Shakespeare

Fear no more the heat o' th' sun Nor the furious winters' rages; Thou thy worldly task hast done, Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages. Golden lads and girls all must, As chimney-sweepers, come to dust.

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William Shakespeare

Come my spade. There is no ancient gentlemen but gardeners, ditchers, and grave-makers; they hold up Adam's profession.

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William Shakespeare

The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. An evil soul producing holy witness Is like a villain with a smiling cheek, A goodly apple rotten at the heart. O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!

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William Shakespeare

While he was drunk asleep, or in his rage, or in the incestuous pleasure of his bed.

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William Shakespeare

Despair and die. The ghosts

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William Shakespeare

Hear the meaning within the word....

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William Shakespeare

All things that are, are with more spirit chased than enjoyed.

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William Shakespeare

Mine honour is my life; both grow in one; Take honour from me, and my life is done.

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William Shakespeare

A contract of eternal bond of love, Confirm'd by mutual joinder of your hands, Arrested by the holy close of lips, Strength'ned by the interchangement of your rings, And all the ceremony of this compact...

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William Shakespeare

Get thee to a nunnery.

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William Shakespeare

Nothing emboldens sin so much as mercy.

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William Shakespeare

Trust not my reading, nor my observations, Which with experimental seal do warrant The tenor of my book.

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William Shakespeare

It is not night when I do see your face.

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William Shakespeare

Of all knowledge the wise and good seek most to know themselves.

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William Shakespeare

Make the upcoming hour overflow with joy, and let pleasure drown the brim.

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William Shakespeare

My thought, whose murder yet is but fantastical, Shakes so my single state of man That function is smothered in surmise, And nothing is but what is not.

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William Shakespeare

If I must die, I will encounter darkness as a bride, and hug it in mine arms.

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William Shakespeare

A violet in the youth of primy nature, Forward, not permanent--sweet, not lasting; The perfume and suppliance of a minute; No more.

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William Shakespeare

You'd be so lean, that blast of January Would blow you through and through. Now, my fair'st friend, I would I had some flowers o' the spring that might Become your time of day.

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William Shakespeare

Foul whisperings are abroad

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William Shakespeare

Forbear to judge, for we are sinners all.

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William Shakespeare

But Kate, dost thou understand thus much English? Canst thou love me?" Catherine: "I cannot tell." Henry: "Can any of your neighbours tell, Kate? I'll ask them.

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William Shakespeare

Well, I will find you twenty lascivious turtles ere one chaste man.

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William Shakespeare

It provokes the desire but it takes away the performance. Therefore much drink may be said to be an equivocator with lechery: it makes him and it mars him; it sets him on and it takes him off.

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William Shakespeare

I told you, sir, they were red-hot with drinking; so full of valor that they smote the air, for breathing in their faces, beat the ground for kissing of their feet.

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William Shakespeare

This making of Christians will raise the price of hogs.

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William Shakespeare

For thou hast given me in this beauteous face A world of earthly blessings to my soul, If sympathy of love unite our thoughts.

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William Shakespeare

What my tongue dares not that my heart shall say

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William Shakespeare

Death, a necessary end, will come when it will come

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William Shakespeare

Macbeth: How does your patient, doctor? Doctor: Not so sick, my lord, as she is troubled with thick-coming fancies that keep her from rest. Macbeth: Cure her of that! Canst thou not minister to a mind...

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William Shakespeare

O, but they say, the tongues of dying men enforce attention, like deep harmony: where words are scarce, they are seldom spent in vain: for they breathe truth, that breathe their words in pain. he, that...

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William Shakespeare

The quality of nothing hath not such need to hide itself

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William Shakespeare

He is a heavy eater of beef. Me thinks it doth harm to his wit.

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William Shakespeare

Hath Romeo slain himself? Say thou but ay, And that bare vowel ay shall poison more Than the death-darting eye of cockatrice. I am not I,if there be such an ay, Or those eyes shut,that make thee answer...

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William Shakespeare

Patch up thine old body for heaven.

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William Shakespeare

The force of his own merit makes his way-a gift that heaven gives for him.

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William Shakespeare

Ay, Much is the force of heaven-bred poesy.

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William Shakespeare

Heaven is above all yet; there sits a judge, That no king can corrupt.

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William Shakespeare

Therefore, to be possess'd with double pomp, To guard a title that was rich before, To gild refined gold, to paint the lily, To throw a perfume on the violet, To smooth the ice, or add another hue Unto...

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William Shakespeare

No sooner met but they looked; no sooner looked but they loved; no sooner loved but they sighed; no sooner sighed but they asked one another the reason; no sooner knew the reason but they sought the remedy;...

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William Shakespeare

When my love swears that she is made of truth, I do believe her, though I know she lies.

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William Shakespeare

O wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful wonderful! And yet again wonderful, and after that, out of all hooping.

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William Shakespeare

There is not one wise man in twenty that will praise himself.

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William Shakespeare

With caution judge of probability. Things deemed unlikely, e'en impossible, experience oft hath proved to be true.

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William Shakespeare

One woman is fair, yet I am well; another is wise, yet I am well; another virtuous, yet I am well; but till all graces be in one woman, one woman shall not come in my grace.

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William Shakespeare

Men are April when they woo, December when they wed...

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William Shakespeare

Now I will believe that there are unicorns...

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William Shakespeare

Cannot you tell that? Every fool can tell that. It was the very day that young Hamlet was born, he that is mad and sent into England." "Ay, marry, why was he sent into England?" "Why, because he was mad....

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William Shakespeare

Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him? - Lady Macbeth

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William Shakespeare

Things base and vile, holding no quantity, Love can transpose to form and dignity. Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind. Nor hath Love's mind of...

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William Shakespeare

A merry heart goes all the way, - A sad one tires inan hour.

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William Shakespeare

I wish you all the joy that you can wish.

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William Shakespeare

There's rosemary, that's for remembrance. Pray you, love, remember.

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William Shakespeare

Free from gross passion or of mirth of anger constant spirit, not swerving with the blood, garnish'd and deck'd in modest compliment, not working with the eye without the ear, and but in purged judgement...

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William Shakespeare

O mischief, thou art swift to enter in the thoughts of desperate men!

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William Shakespeare

Here's that which is too weak to be a sinner, honest water, which ne'er left man i' the mire.

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William Shakespeare

But like of each thing that in season grows.

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William Shakespeare

Temptation is the fire that brings up the scum of the heart.

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William Shakespeare

There is a time in the affairs of men, Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune.

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William Shakespeare

Happy thou art not; for what thou hast not, still thou strivest to get; and what thou hast, forgettest.

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William Shakespeare

My crown is in my heart, not on my head; not decked with diamonds and Indian stones, nor to be seen: my crown is called content, a crown it is that seldom kings enjoy.

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William Shakespeare

Hopeless and helpless doth Egeon wend, But to procrastinate his liveless end.

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William Shakespeare

Virtue is chok'd with foul ambition

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William Shakespeare

Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more.

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William Shakespeare

At Christmas, I no more desire a rose.

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William Shakespeare

Some are born great, others achieve greatness.

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William Shakespeare

Come, and take choice of all my library, And so beguile thy sorrow.

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William Shakespeare

The coward dies a thousand deaths, the valiant, only once!

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William Shakespeare

He thinks too much. Such men are dangerous.

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William Shakespeare

O good old man, how well in thee appears The constant service of the antique world, When service sweat for duty, not for meed! Thou art not for the fashion of these times, Where none will sweat but for...

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William Shakespeare

One good deed dying tongueless Slaughters a thousand waiting upon that. Our praises are our wages.

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William Shakespeare

He capers, he dances, he has eyes of youth, he writes verses, he speaks holiday, he smells April and May.

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William Shakespeare

She is your treasure, she must have a husband; I must dance bare-foot on her wedding day, And, for your love to her, lead apes in hell.

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William Shakespeare

Come, Let's have one other gaudy night. Call to me All my sad captains. Fill our bowls once more. Let's mock the midnight bell.

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William Shakespeare

Our wills and fates do so contrary run.

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William Shakespeare

I...Kisss the tender inward of thy hand.

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William Shakespeare

for Mercutio's soul Is but a little way above our heads, Staying for thine to keep him company: Either thou, or I, or both, must go with him.

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William Shakespeare

Is there no respect of place, persons, nor time in you?

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William Shakespeare

The hind that would be mated by the lion Must die for love.

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William Shakespeare

Let's go hand in hand, not one before another.

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William Shakespeare

The pleasing punishment that women bear.

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William Shakespeare

With this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature. for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere,...

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William Shakespeare

Let us be Diana's foresters, gentlemen of the shade, minions of the moon

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William Shakespeare

Away, you trifler! Love! I love thee not, I care not for thee, Kate: this is no world To play with mammets and to tilt with lips: We must have bloody noses and cracked crowns.

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William Shakespeare

Thy tongue Makes Welsh as sweet as ditties highly penn'd, Sung by a fair queen in a summer's bower, With ravishing division, to her lute.

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William Shakespeare

Why are our bodies soft, and weak, and smooth But that our soft conditions and our hearts Should well agree with our external parts?

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William Shakespeare

Swear me, Kate, like a lady as thou art, A good mouth-filling oath.

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William Shakespeare

Love for thy love , and hand for hand I give.

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William Shakespeare

A breath thou art, Servile to all the skyey influences.

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William Shakespeare

See where she comes apparelled like the spring.

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William Shakespeare

Was ever woman in this humour wooed? Was ever woman in this humour won?

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William Shakespeare

Grim-visaged war hath smoothed his wrinkled front; And now, instead of mounting barbed steeds To fright the souls of fearful adversaries, He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber To the lascivious...

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William Shakespeare

Strong reasons make strong actions.

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William Shakespeare

But I, that am not shaped for sportive tricks, Nor made to court an amorous looking-glass; I, that am rudely stamped, and want love's majesty To strut before a wanton ambling nymph;

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William Shakespeare

Now, by the world, it is a lusty wench; I love her ten times more than e'er I did: O, how I long to have some chat with her!

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William Shakespeare

I am giddy, expectation whirls me round. The imaginary relish is so sweet That it enchants my sense.

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William Shakespeare

Fie, fie upon her! There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks; her wanton spirits look out At every joint and motive of her body.

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William Shakespeare

Lechery, lechery; still, wars and lechery: nothing else holds fashion.

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William Shakespeare

Is she not passing fair?

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William Shakespeare

O heaven! were man, But constant, he were perfect.

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William Shakespeare

While we lie tumbling in the hay.

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William Shakespeare

I love a ballad in print o' life, for then we are sure they are true.

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William Shakespeare

I love him for his sake; And yet I know him a notorious liar, Think him a great way fool, solely a coward; Yet these fix'd evils sit so fit in him That they take place when virtue's steely bones Looks...

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William Shakespeare

Though age from folly could not give me freedom, It does from childishness.

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William Shakespeare

The amity that wisdom knits not, folly may easily untie.

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William Shakespeare

But I remember now I am in this earthly world, where to do harm Is often laudable, to do good sometime Accounted dangerous folly.

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William Shakespeare

The why is plain as way to parish church: He that a fool doth very wisely hit Doth very foolishly, although he smart, Not to seem senseless of the bob; if not, The wise man's folly is anatomiz'd Even...

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William Shakespeare

The common curse of mankind, folly and ignorance, be thine in great revenue!

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William Shakespeare

This man, lady, hath robb'd many beasts of their particular additions: he is as valiant as a lion, churlish as the bear, slow as the elephant-a man into whom nature hath so crowded humours that his valour...

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William Shakespeare

To be in love- where scorn is bought with groans, Coy looks with heart-sore sighs, one fading moment's mirth With twenty watchful, weary, tedious nights; If haply won, perhaps a hapless gain; If lost,...

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William Shakespeare

She marking them begins a wailing note And sings extemporally a woeful ditty How love makes young men thrall and old men dote How love is wise in folly, foolish-witty Her heavy anthem still concludes in...

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William Shakespeare

Some sins do bear their privilege on earth, And so doth yours: your fault was not your folly; Needs must you lay your heart at his dispose, Subjected tribute to commanding love, Against whose fury...

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William Shakespeare

We that are true lovers run into strange capers; but as all is mortal in nature, so is all nature in love mortal in folly.

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William Shakespeare

Blow, blow, thou winter wind, Thou art not so unkind As mans ingratitude Thy tooth is not so keen, Because thou art not seen, Although thy breath be rude. Heigh-ho sing, heigh-ho unto the green holly Most...

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William Shakespeare

And writers say, as the most forward bud Is eaten by the canker ere it blow, Even so by love the young and tender wit Is turn'd to folly, blasting in the bud, Losing his verdure even in the prime, And...

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William Shakespeare

I have neither the scholar's melancholy, which is emulation; nor the musician's, which is fantastical; nor the courtier's, which is proud; not the soldier's which is ambitious; nor the lawyer's, which...

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William Shakespeare

Strikes deeper, grows with more pernicious root.

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William Shakespeare

Let me tell you, Cassius, you yourself are much condemned to have an itching palm.

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William Shakespeare

Ha. "Against my will I am sent to bid you come into dinner." There's a double meaning in that. -Benedick (Much Ado)

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William Shakespeare

Present fears are less than horrible imaginings.

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William Shakespeare

If your mind dislike anything obey it

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William Shakespeare

Why, then the world ’s mine oyster, Which I with sword will open.

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William Shakespeare

Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.

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William Shakespeare

Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave My heart into my mouth.

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William Shakespeare

Where is your ancient courage? You were used to say extremities was the trier of spirits; That common chances common men could bear; That when the sea was calm all boats alike showed mastership in floating.

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William Shakespeare

O that my tongue were in the thunder's mouth! Then with passion would I shake the world...

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William Shakespeare

Conceit in weakest bodies works the strongest.

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William Shakespeare

Conceit, more rich in matter than in words, brags of his substance: they are but beggars who can count their worth.

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William Shakespeare

Thy wish was father, Harry, to that thought.

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William Shakespeare

Good Hamlet, cast thy nighted colour off ... Do not for ever with thy vailed lids Seek for thy noble father in the dust.

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William Shakespeare

If by chance I talk a little wild, forgive me; I had it from my father.

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William Shakespeare

The Dear father Would with his daughter speak, commands her service; Are they inform'd of this?

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William Shakespeare

To you your father should be as a god.

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William Shakespeare

Love is begun by time and time qualifies the spark and fire of it.

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William Shakespeare

You have her father's love, Demetrius; Let me have Hermia's: do you marry him!

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William Shakespeare

O, that our fathers would applause our loves, To seal our happiness with hteir consents!

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William Shakespeare

As a decrepit father takes delight To see his active child do deeds of youth, So I, made lame by fortune's dearest spite, Take all my comfort of thy worth and truth.

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William Shakespeare

I am a foe to tyrants, and my country's friend.

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William Shakespeare

In right and service to their noble country.

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William Shakespeare

Who is here so vile that will not love his country?

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William Shakespeare

I thank you all and here dismiss you all, and to the love and favor of my country commit myself, my person, and the cause.

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William Shakespeare

Having my freedom, boast of nothing else.

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William Shakespeare

Gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder, I gain'd my freedom.

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William Shakespeare

Let's all cry peace, freedom, and liberty!

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William Shakespeare

This liberty is all that I request.

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William Shakespeare

Leave us to our free election.

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William Shakespeare

He uses his folly like a stalking-horse, and under the presentation of that he shoots his wit.

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William Shakespeare

Love from one side hurts, but love from two sides heals.

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William Shakespeare

The sweetest honey is loathsome in its own deliciousness. And in the taste destroys the appetite. Therefore, love moderately.

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William Shakespeare

It is silliness to live when to live is torment, and then have we a prescription to die when death is our physician.

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William Shakespeare

Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks within his bending sickle's compass come.

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William Shakespeare

Yet but three come one more. Two of both kinds make up four. Ere she comes curst and sad. Cupid is a knavish lad. Thus to make poor females mad.

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William Shakespeare

What's brave, what's noble, let's do it after the Roman fashion.

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William Shakespeare

Live in thy shame, but die not shame with thee!

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William Shakespeare

Have patience, and endure

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William Shakespeare

The best is yet to come.

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William Shakespeare

Seek happy nights to happy days.W

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William Shakespeare

There is plenty of time to sleep in the grave

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William Shakespeare

Give them great meals of beef and iron and steel, they will eat like wolves and fight like devils.

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William Shakespeare

And oft, my jealousy shapes faults that are not.

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William Shakespeare

The venom clamours of a jealous woman poison more deadly than a mad dog's tooth.

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William Shakespeare

If I shall be condemned Upon surmises, all proofs sleeping else But what your jealousies awake, I tell you 'Tis rigor and not law.

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William Shakespeare

But jealous souls will not be answered so, They are not ever jealous for the cause, But jealous for they're jealous. 'Tis a monster Begot upon itself, born on itself.

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William Shakespeare

I do beseech you- Though I perchance am vicious in my guess , that your wisdom yet From one that so imperfectly conjects Would take no notice, nor build yourself a trouble Out of his scattering and unsure...

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William Shakespeare

Doubt is a thief that often makes us fear to tread where we might have won.

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William Shakespeare

I do I know not what, and fear to find Mine eye too great a flatterer for my mind. Fate, show thy force. Ourselves we do not owe. What is decreed must be; and be this so.

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William Shakespeare

For I can raise no money by vile means. By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas

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William Shakespeare

He that commends me to mine own content Commends me to the thing I cannot get.

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William Shakespeare

The trust I have is in mine innocence, and therefore am I bold and resolute.

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William Shakespeare

I thank God I am as honest as any man living that is an old man and no honester than I.

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William Shakespeare

Age cannot wither her, nor custom stale Her infinite variety.

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William Shakespeare

I will be correspondent to command, And do my spiriting gently.

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William Shakespeare

I am wealthy in my friends.

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William Shakespeare

A kind Of excellent dumb discourse.

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William Shakespeare

I will make a Star-chamber matter of it.

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William Shakespeare

Although the last, not least.

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William Shakespeare

From this day forward until the end of the world...we in it shall be remembered...we band of brothers.

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William Shakespeare

Courage mounteth with occasion.

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William Shakespeare

I would fain die a dry death.

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William Shakespeare

Small to greater matters must give way.

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William Shakespeare

For Brutus is an honourable man; So are they all, all honourable men.

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William Shakespeare

He hath eaten me out of house and home.

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William Shakespeare

What seest thou else In the dark backward and abysm of time?

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William Shakespeare

The law hath not been dead, though it hath slept.

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William Shakespeare

Thou art all the comfort, The Gods will diet me with.

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William Shakespeare

How use doth breed a habit in a man.

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William Shakespeare

Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight?...

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William Shakespeare

How many ages hence Shall this our lofty scene be acted over In states unborn and accents yet unknown!

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William Shakespeare

Thou shalt be both the plaintiff and the judge of thine own cause.

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William Shakespeare

I cannot tell what the dickens his name is.

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William Shakespeare

Be great in act, as you have been in thought.

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William Shakespeare

Their understanding Begins to swell and the approaching tide Will shortly fill the reasonable shores That now lie foul and muddy.

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William Shakespeare

For they are yet ear-kissing arguments.

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William Shakespeare

I have heard of your paintings too, well enough; God has given you one face, and you make yourselves another.

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William Shakespeare

Fill all thy bones with aches.

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William Shakespeare

Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground.

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William Shakespeare

I pray thee cease thy counsel, Which falls into mine ears as profitless as water in a sieve.

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William Shakespeare

I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated To closeness and the bettering of my mind.

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William Shakespeare

I must be cruel, only to be kind.

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William Shakespeare

The hand that hath made you fair hath made you good. Pity is the virtue of the law, and none but tyrants use it cruelly.

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William Shakespeare

If this were played upon a stage now, I could condemn it as an improbable fiction.

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William Shakespeare

A hit, a very palpable hit.

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William Shakespeare

I shall despair. There is no creature loves me; And if I die no soul will pity me: And wherefore should they, since that I myself Find in myself no pity to myself?

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William Shakespeare

When he is best, he is a little worse than a man; and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.

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William Shakespeare

See first that the design is wise and just: that ascertained, pursue it resolutely; do not for one repulse forego the purpose that you resolved to effect.

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William Shakespeare

When griping grief the heart doth wound, and doleful dumps the mind opresses, then music, with her silver sound, with speedy help doth lend redress.

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William Shakespeare

The gaudy, blabbing, and remorseful day Is crept into the bosom of the sea.

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William Shakespeare

Oh, that way madness lies; let me shun that.

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William Shakespeare

Some men never seem to grow old. Always active in thought, always ready to adopt new ideas, they are never chargeable with foggyism. Satisfied, yet ever dissatisfied, settled, yet ever unsettled, they...

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William Shakespeare

Each present joy or sorrow seems the chief.

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William Shakespeare

I have not slept one wink.

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William Shakespeare

But no perfection is so absolute, That some impurity doth not pollute.

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William Shakespeare

I wish you well and so I take my leave, I Pray you know me when we meet again.

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William Shakespeare

Speak to me as to thy thinkings, As thou dost ruminate, and give thy worst of thoughts The worst of words.

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William Shakespeare

We have some salt of our youth in us.

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William Shakespeare

He that dies pays all debts.

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William Shakespeare

My salad days, When I was green in judgment.

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William Shakespeare

So may he rest, his faults lie gently on him!

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William Shakespeare

Come not within the measure of my wrath.

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William Shakespeare

Like one Who having into truth, by telling of it, Made such a sinner of his memory, To credit his own lie.

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William Shakespeare

While thou livest keep a good tongue in thy head.

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William Shakespeare

Thou art the Mars of malcontents.

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William Shakespeare

Let me not to the marriage of true minds Admit impediments: love is not love Which alters when it alteration finds.

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William Shakespeare

Thy words, I grant are bigger, for I wear not, my dagger in my mouth.

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William Shakespeare

Home-keeping youth have ever homely wits.

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William Shakespeare

Your hearts are mighty, your skins are whole.

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William Shakespeare

I do begin to have bloody thoughts.

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William Shakespeare

This England never did, nor never shall, Lie at the proud foot of a conqueror.

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William Shakespeare

The gods are just, and of our pleasant vices Make instruments to plague us.

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William Shakespeare

It is meant that noble minds keep ever with their likes; for who so firm that cannot be seduced.

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William Shakespeare

What the great ones do, the less will prattle of

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William Shakespeare

My meaning in saying he is a good man, is to have you understand me that he is sufficient.

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William Shakespeare

Though inclination be as sharp as will, My stronger guilt defeats my strong intent, And, like a man to double business bound, I stand in pause where I shall first begin, And both neglect.

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William Shakespeare

Merrily, merrily shall I live now, Under the blossom that hangs on the bough.

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William Shakespeare

The peace of heaven is theirs that lift their swords, in such a just and charitable war.

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William Shakespeare

If there be no great love in the beginning, yet heaven may decrease it upon better acquaintance, when we are married and have more occasion to know one another: I hope, upon familiarity will grow more...

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William Shakespeare

It is a familiar beast to man, and signifies love.

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William Shakespeare

Those that are good manners at the court are as ridiculous in the country, as the behavior of the country is most mockable at the court.

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William Shakespeare

We do not keep the outward form of order, where there is deep disorder in the mind.

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William Shakespeare

A very ancient and fish-like smell.

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William Shakespeare

Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing.

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William Shakespeare

Cursed be he that moves my bones.

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William Shakespeare

This is the short and the long of it.

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William Shakespeare

He wears his faith but as the fashion of his hat.

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William Shakespeare

Your face is a book, where men may read strange matters.

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William Shakespeare

I pray you bear me henceforth from the noise and rumour of the field, where I may think the remnant of my thoughts in peace, and part of this body and my soul with contemplation and devout desires.

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William Shakespeare

Man and wife, being two, are one in love.

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William Shakespeare

Sir, in my heart there was a kind of fighting That would not let me sleep.

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William Shakespeare

Now entertain conjecture of a time, When creeping murmur and the pouring dark Fill the wide vessel of the universe... Chorus Henry V

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William Shakespeare

My grief lies all within, And these external manners of lament Are merely shadows to the unseen grief That swells with silence in the tortured soul.

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William Shakespeare

Who is it can read a woman?

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William Shakespeare

It is the disease of not listening...... that I am troubled with.

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William Shakespeare

Done to death by slanderous tongue

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William Shakespeare

The Eyes are the window to your soul

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William Shakespeare

I'll break my staff, bury it certain fathoms in the earth, and deeper than did ever plummet sound, I'll drown my book!

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William Shakespeare

Now is the winter of our discontent Made glorious summer by this sun of York; And all the clouds that lour'd upon our house In the deep bosom of the ocean buried.

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William Shakespeare

Nature teaches beasts to know their friends.

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William Shakespeare

They are sick that surfeit with too much, as they that starve with nothing.

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William Shakespeare

Give thanks for what you are today and go on fighting for what you gone be tomorrow

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William Shakespeare

There is Throats to be cut, and Works to be done.

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William Shakespeare

For death remembered should be like a mirror, Who tells us life’s but breath, to trust it error.

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William Shakespeare

So many horrid Ghosts.

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William Shakespeare

A lion among ladies is a most dreadful thing.

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William Shakespeare

For a quart of ale is a dish for a king.

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William Shakespeare

I would give all of my fame for a pot of ale and safety.

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William Shakespeare

Know more than other. Work more than other. Expect less than other

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William Shakespeare

There's no better sign of a brave mind than a hard hand.

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William Shakespeare

A woman would run through fire and water for such a kind heart.

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William Shakespeare

We cannot all be masters.

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William Shakespeare

. . . from this moment The very firstlings of my heart shall be The firstlings of my hand. And even now, To crown my thoughts with acts, be it thought and done:

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William Shakespeare

I thought my heart had been wounded with the claws of a lion.

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William Shakespeare

A heavy heart bears not a nimble tongue.

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William Shakespeare

O tiger's heart wrapped in a woman's hide!

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William Shakespeare

He's truly valiant that can wisely suffer The worst that man can breathe, and make his wrongs His outsides, to wear them like his raiment, carelessly, And ne'er prefer his injuries to his heart, To bring...

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William Shakespeare

My heart is turned to stone; I strike it, and it hurts my hand.

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William Shakespeare

Well, I'll repent, and that suddenly, while I am in some liking; I shall be out of heart shortly, and then I shall have no strength to repent.

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William Shakespeare

It warms the very sickness in my heart, That I shall live and tell him to his teeth, "Thus diddest thou;"

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William Shakespeare

He hath a heart as sound as a bell, and his tongue is the clapper; for what his heart thinks his tongue speaks.

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William Shakespeare

Two lovely berries moulded on one stem; So, with two seeming bodies, but one heart;

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William Shakespeare

These signs have marked me extraordinary, And all the courses of my life do show I am not in the roll of common men.

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William Shakespeare

Take heed, dear heart, of this large privilege; The hardest knife ill-used doth lose his edge.

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William Shakespeare

Thou canst not speak of thou dost not feel.

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William Shakespeare

What must be shall be.

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William Shakespeare

The teeming Autumn big with rich increase, bearing the wanton burden of the prime like widowed wombs after their lords decease.

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William Shakespeare

Ready to go but never to return.

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William Shakespeare

The Devil hath power To assume a pleasing shape.

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William Shakespeare

These blessed candles of the night.

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William Shakespeare

Like a red morn that ever yet betokened, Wreck to the seaman, tempest to the field, Sorrow to the shepherds, woe unto the birds, Gusts and foul flaws to herdmen and to herds.

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William Shakespeare

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,Creeps in this petty pace from day to day

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William Shakespeare

Olivia: What's a drunken man like, fool? Feste: Like a drowned man, a fool, and a madman: one draught above heat makes him a fool; the second mads him; and a third drowns him.

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William Shakespeare

He is not worthy of the honey-comb, that shuns the hives because the bees have stings.

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William Shakespeare

Adversity's sweet milk, philosophy.

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William Shakespeare

In law, what plea so tainted and corrupts, but being seasoned with a gracious voice obscures the show of evil.

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William Shakespeare

My love is thine to teach; teach it but how, And thou shalt see how apt it is to learn. Any hard lesson that may do thee good.

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William Shakespeare

What showers arise, blown with the windy tempest of my heart

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William Shakespeare

Through tattered clothes, small vices do appear. Robes and furred gowns hide all.

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William Shakespeare

Methought I heard a voice cry, Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep, - the innocent sleep; Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of...

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William Shakespeare

The more pity, that fools may not speak wisely what wise men do foolishly.

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William Shakespeare

So distribution should undo excess, and each man have enough.

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William Shakespeare

So quick bright things come to confusion.​​​​​​

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William Shakespeare

We are oft to blame in this, - 'tis too much proved, - that with devotion's visage, and pios action we do sugar o'er the devil himself.

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William Shakespeare

You common cry of curs! whose breath I hate As reek o' the rotten fens, whose loves I prize As the dead carcasses of unburied men That do corrupt my air, I banish you; And here remain with your uncertainty!

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William Shakespeare

I am your wife if you will marry me. If not, I'll die your maid. To be your fellow You may deny me, but I'll be your servant Whether you will or no.

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William Shakespeare

Wise men never sit and wail their loss, but cheerily seek how to redress their harms.

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William Shakespeare

In me thou see'st the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west, Which by and by black night doth take away Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. -Sonnet 73

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William Shakespeare

O horror! Horror! Horror! Tongue nor heart Cannot conceive nor name thee!

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William Shakespeare

So. Lie there, my art.

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William Shakespeare

Costly thy habit [dress] as thy purse can buy; But not expressed in fancy - rich, not gaudy. For the apparel oft proclaims the man.

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William Shakespeare

And in the end... the love you get equals the love you give

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William Shakespeare

The painful warrior famous for fight, After a thousand victories, once foil'd, Is from the books of honor razed quite, And all the rest forgot for which he toil'd

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William Shakespeare

Do not, as some ungracious pastors do, Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven; Whilst, like a puff'd and reckless libertine, Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads And recks not his own read.

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William Shakespeare

Prepare for mirth, for mirth becomes a feast.

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William Shakespeare

I fill up a place, which may be better... when I have made it empty.

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William Shakespeare

So dear I love him that with him, All deaths I could endure. Without him, live no life

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William Shakespeare

So we'll live, And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh at gilded butterflies.

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William Shakespeare

By my soul I swear, there is no power in the tongue of man to alter me.

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William Shakespeare

She moves me not, or not removes at least affection's edge in me.

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William Shakespeare

He kills her in her own humor.

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William Shakespeare

Give every man thine ear, but few thy voice; Take each man's censure, but reserve thy judgment.

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William Shakespeare

And thence from Athens turn away our eyes To seek new friends and stranger companies.

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William Shakespeare

Men must learn now with pity to dispense; For policy sits above conscience.

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William Shakespeare

Neither a borrower nor a lender be, for loan oft loses both itself and friend, and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.

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William Shakespeare

Tis in my memory lock'd, And you yourself shall keep the key of it.

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William Shakespeare

HAMLET [...] we fat all creatures else to fat us, and we fat ourselves for maggots. Your fat king and your lean beggar is but variable service, two dishes, but to one table; that's the end. CLAUDIUS Alas,...

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William Shakespeare

ROSENCRANTZ My lord, you must tell us where the body is, and go with us to the king. HAMLET The body is with the king, but the king is not with the body. The king is a thing - GUILDENSTERN A thing my lord?...

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William Shakespeare

I'll teach you differences.

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William Shakespeare

Keep thy friend Under thy own life's key.

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William Shakespeare

A friend should bear his friend's infirmities.

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William Shakespeare

The band that seems to tie their friendship together will be the very strangler of their amity.

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William Shakespeare

To set a gloss on faint deeds, hollow welcomes, Recanting goodness, sorry ere 'tis shown; But where there is true friendship, there needs none.

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William Shakespeare

I desire you in friendship, and I will one way or other make you amends.

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William Shakespeare

To mingle friendship far is mingling bloods.

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William Shakespeare

Thy friendship makes us fresh.

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William Shakespeare

Since my dear soul was mistress of her choice And could of men distinguish her election, Sh'ath sealed thee for herself.

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William Shakespeare

If thou wilt lend this money, lend it not As to thy friends; for when did friendship take A breed for barren metal of his friend?

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William Shakespeare

There is flattery in friendship.

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William Shakespeare

That which I would discover The law of friendship bids me to conceal.

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William Shakespeare

A young man married is a man that's marred.

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William Shakespeare

Madam, you have bereft me of all words, Only my blood speaks to you in my veins,

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William Shakespeare

I am falser than vows made in wine.

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William Shakespeare

Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I ha' lost my reputation, I ha' lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial!

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William Shakespeare

Good wine needs no bush.

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William Shakespeare

A cup of hot wine with not a drop of allaying Tiber in 't.

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William Shakespeare

Roses have thorns, and silver fountains mud; Clouds and eclipses stain both moon and sun, And loathsome canker lies in sweetest bud. All men make faults.

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William Shakespeare

Dirty days hath September April June and November From January up to May The rain it raineth every day All the rest have thirty-one Without a blessed gleam of sun And if any of them had two-and-thirty They'd...

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William Shakespeare

I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. The game's afoot; Follow your spirit: and upon this charge, Cry — God for Harry! England and Saint George!

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William Shakespeare

Are you up to your destiny?

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William Shakespeare

There was a star danced, and under that was I born.

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William Shakespeare

How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon this bank Here we will sit, and let the sounds of music Creep in our ears; soft stillness, and the night Become the touches of sweet harmony

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William Shakespeare

Your cause of sorrow must not be measured by his worth, for then it hath no end.

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William Shakespeare

Swift as shadow, short as any dream

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William Shakespeare

Tis in ourselves that we are thus or thus. Our bodies are our gardens to the which our wills are gardeners.

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William Shakespeare

Thou shalt be free As mountain winds: but then exactly do All points of my command.

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William Shakespeare

A man cannot make him laugh; but that's no marvel; he drinks no wine.... If I had a thousand sons, the first human principle I would teach them should be, to forswear thin potations and to addict themselves...

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William Shakespeare

With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come. And let my liver rather heat with wine, than my heart cool with mortifying groans.

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William Shakespeare

If thou dost love, proclaim it faithfully.

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William Shakespeare

Tell me, daughter Juliet, How stands your dispositions to be married" It is an honor that I dream not of

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William Shakespeare

Captain of our fairy band, Helena is here at hand, And the youth, mistook by me, Pleading for a lover's fee. Shall we their fond pageant see? Lord, what fools these mortals be!

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William Shakespeare

And worse I may be yet: the worst is not So long as we can say 'This is the worst.

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William Shakespeare

Dead shepherd, now I find thy saw of might. Whoever lov'd that lov'd not at first sight.

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William Shakespeare

Oh, God! I have an ill-divining soul!

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William Shakespeare

Live how we can, yet die we must.

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William Shakespeare

Set honour in one eye and death i' the other, And I will look on both indifferently.

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William Shakespeare

I'll be supposed upon a book, his face is the worst thing about him.

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William Shakespeare

Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.

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William Shakespeare

A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.

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William Shakespeare

Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.

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William Shakespeare

If you prick us do we not bleed? If you tickle us do we not laugh? If you poison us do we not die? And if you wrong us shall we not revenge?

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William Shakespeare

All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances; and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages.

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William Shakespeare

It is not in the stars to hold our destiny but in ourselves.

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William Shakespeare

Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more; it is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

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William Shakespeare

To thine own self be true, and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.

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William Shakespeare

The wheel is come full circle.

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William Shakespeare

God has given you one face, and you make yourself another.

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William Shakespeare

Ignorance is the curse of God; knowledge is the wing wherewith we fly to heaven.

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William Shakespeare

Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow, that I shall say good night till it be morrow.

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William Shakespeare

When a father gives to his son, both laugh; when a son gives to his father, both cry.

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William Shakespeare

Cowards die many times before their deaths; the valiant never taste of death but once.

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William Shakespeare

The course of true love never did run smooth.

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William Shakespeare

Listen to many, speak to a few.

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William Shakespeare

Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.

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William Shakespeare

As soon go kindle fire with snow, as seek to quench the fire of love with words.

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William Shakespeare

There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so.

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William Shakespeare

And this, our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.

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William Shakespeare

Suspicion always haunts the guilty mind.

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William Shakespeare

Better a witty fool than a foolish wit.

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William Shakespeare

The evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with their bones.

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William Shakespeare

It is a wise father that knows his own child.

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William Shakespeare

Come, gentlemen, I hope we shall drink down all unkindness.

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William Shakespeare

No legacy is so rich as honesty.

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William Shakespeare

A peace is of the nature of a conquest; for then both parties nobly are subdued, and neither party loser.

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William Shakespeare

There is a tide in the affairs of men, Which taken at the flood, leads on to fortune. Omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries. On such a full sea are we now afloat. And...

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William Shakespeare

And why not death rather than living torment? To die is to be banish'd from myself; And Silvia is myself: banish'd from her Is self from self: a deadly banishment!

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William Shakespeare

What's in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.

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William Shakespeare

But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes.

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William Shakespeare

Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we oft might win by fearing to attempt.

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William Shakespeare

Women may fall when there's no strength in men.

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William Shakespeare

Love is a smoke made with the fume of sighs.

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William Shakespeare

We know what we are, but know not what we may be.

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William Shakespeare

Now, God be praised, that to believing souls gives light in darkness, comfort in despair.

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William Shakespeare

How far that little candle throws its beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.

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William Shakespeare

This above all; to thine own self be true.

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William Shakespeare

An overflow of good converts to bad.

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William Shakespeare

for my grief's so great That no supporter but the huge firm earth Can hold it up: here I and sorrows sit; Here is my throne, bid kings come bow to it. (Constance, from King John, Act III, scene 1)

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William Shakespeare

How poor are they that have not patience! What wound did ever heal but by degrees?

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William Shakespeare

Who could refrain that had a heart to love and in that heart courage to make love known?

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William Shakespeare

The empty vessel makes the loudest sound.

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William Shakespeare

Talking isn't doing. It is a kind of good deed to say well; and yet words are not deeds.

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William Shakespeare

The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.

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William Shakespeare

False face must hide what the false heart doth know.

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William Shakespeare

Words without thoughts never to heaven go.

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William Shakespeare

Life is as tedious as twice-told tale, vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.

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William Shakespeare

Men are April when they woo, December when they wed. Maids are May when they are maids, but the sky changes when they are wives.

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William Shakespeare

The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils.

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William Shakespeare

Love sought is good, but given unsought, is better.

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William Shakespeare

A man loves the meat in his youth that he cannot endure in his age.

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William Shakespeare

When we are born we cry that we are come to this great stage of fools.

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William Shakespeare

With mirth and laughter let old wrinkles come.

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William Shakespeare

Give thy thoughts no tongue.

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William Shakespeare

Because it is a customary cross, As die to love as thoughts, and dreams, and sighs, Wishes, and tears, poor fancy's followers.

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William Shakespeare

Speak low, if you speak love.

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William Shakespeare

And oftentimes excusing of a fault doth make the fault the worse by the excuse.

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William Shakespeare

And sleep, that sometime shuts up sorrow's eye, Steal me awhile from mine own company.

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William Shakespeare

Fishes live in the sea, as men do a-land; the great ones eat up the little ones.

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William Shakespeare

I say there is no darkness but ignorance.

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William Shakespeare

Still it cried ‘Sleep no more!’ to all the house: ‘Glamis hath murder’d sleep, and therefore Cawdor shall sleep no more,—Macbeth shall sleep no more!

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William Shakespeare

Let me embrace thee, sour adversity, for wise men say it is the wisest course.

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William Shakespeare

Infirm of purpose! Give me the daggers: the sleeping and the dead are but as pictures: ‘tis the eye of childhood that fears a painted devil

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William Shakespeare

Boldness be my friend.

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William Shakespeare

What hands are here? ha! they pluck out mine eyes! Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood clean from my hand? No; this my hand will rather the multitudinous seas incarnadine, making the green...

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William Shakespeare

O! Let me not be mad, not mad, sweet heaven; keep me in temper; I would not be mad!

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William Shakespeare

I have almost forgotten the taste of fears: The time has been, my senses would have cool’d to hear a night-shriek; and my fell of hair would at a dismal treatise rouse and stir as life were in’t: I...

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William Shakespeare

How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is to have a thankless child!

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William Shakespeare

Pleasure and action make the hours seem short.

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William Shakespeare

Alas, I am a woman friendless, hopeless!

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William Shakespeare

Reputation is an idle and most false imposition; oft got without merit, and lost without deserving.

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William Shakespeare

Life every man holds dear; but the dear man holds honor far more precious dear than life.

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William Shakespeare

Ambition should be made of sterner stuff.

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William Shakespeare

I am not bound to please thee with my answer.

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William Shakespeare

Love is too young to know what conscience is.

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William Shakespeare

In time we hate that which we often fear.

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William Shakespeare

I may neither choose who I would, nor refuse who I dislike; so is the will of a living daughter curbed by the will of a dead father.

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William Shakespeare

No, I will be the pattern of all patience; I will say nothing.

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William Shakespeare

When sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions.

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William Shakespeare

Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice.

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William Shakespeare

The golden age is before us, not behind us.

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William Shakespeare

Go to you bosom: Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know.

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William Shakespeare

If you can look into the seeds of time, and say which grain will grow and which will not, speak then unto me.

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William Shakespeare

The robbed that smiles, steals something from the thief.

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William Shakespeare

Having nothing, nothing can he lose.

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William Shakespeare

They do not love that do not show their love.

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William Shakespeare

I wasted time, and now doth time waste me.

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William Shakespeare

What's done can't be undone.

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William Shakespeare

Love is not love that alters when it alteration finds.

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William Shakespeare

As he was valiant, I honour him. But as he was ambitious, I slew him.

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William Shakespeare

I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano; A stage where every man must play a part, And mine is a sad one.

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William Shakespeare

To do a great right do a little wrong.

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William Shakespeare

But men are men; the best sometimes forget.

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William Shakespeare

'Tis not enough to help the feeble up, but to support them after.

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William Shakespeare

The most peaceable way for you, if you do take a thief, is, to let him show himself what he is and steal out of your company.

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William Shakespeare

The lunatic, the lover, and the poet, are of imagination all compact.

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William Shakespeare

Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.

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William Shakespeare

The love of heaven makes one heavenly.

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William Shakespeare

I had rather have a fool to make me merry than experience to make me sad and to travel for it too!

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William Shakespeare

Poor and content is rich, and rich enough.

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William Shakespeare

The lady doth protest too much, methinks.

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William Shakespeare

Things done well and with a care, exempt themselves from fear.

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William Shakespeare

To be, or not to be, that is the question.

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William Shakespeare

Now is the winter of our discontent.

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William Shakespeare

Sweet are the uses of adversity which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, wears yet a precious jewel in his head.

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William Shakespeare

When words are scarce they are seldom spent in vain.

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William Shakespeare

Children wish fathers looked but with their eyes; fathers that children with their judgment looked; and either may be wrong.

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William Shakespeare

There's many a man has more hair than wit.

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William Shakespeare

Modest doubt is called the beacon of the wise.

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William Shakespeare

Maids want nothing but husbands, and when they have them, they want everything.

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William Shakespeare

Let every eye negotiate for itself and trust no agent.

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William Shakespeare

Give me my robe, put on my crown; I have Immortal longings in me.

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William Shakespeare

There's no art to find the mind's construction in the face.

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William Shakespeare

My crown is called content, a crown that seldom kings enjoy.

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William Shakespeare

The very substance of the ambitious is merely the shadow of a dream.

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William Shakespeare

Lawless are they that make their wills their law.

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William Shakespeare

What is past is prologue.

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William Shakespeare

Brevity is the soul of wit.

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William Shakespeare

The undiscovered country from whose bourn no traveler returns.

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William Shakespeare

Virtue is bold, and goodness never fearful.

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William Shakespeare

Faith, there hath been many great men that have flattered the people who ne'er loved them.

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William Shakespeare

O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil.

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William Shakespeare

Words, words, mere words, no matter from the heart.

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William Shakespeare

By that sin fell the angels.

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William Shakespeare

If it be a sin to covet honor, I am the most offending soul.

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William Shakespeare

Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot that it do singe yourself.

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William Shakespeare

If to do were as easy as to know what were good to do, chapels had been churches, and poor men's cottage princes' palaces.

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William Shakespeare

Suit the action to the word, the word to the action.

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William Shakespeare

Desire of having is the sin of covetousness.

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William Shakespeare

Things won are done, joy's soul lies in the doing.

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William Shakespeare

It is the stars, The stars above us, govern our conditions.

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William Shakespeare

Highly fed and lowly taught.

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William Shakespeare

Wisely, and slow. They stumble that run fast.

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William Shakespeare

Thou art thy mother's glass, and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime.

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William Shakespeare

Teach not thy lip such scorn, for it was made For kissing, lady, not for such contempt.

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William Shakespeare

The fashion of the world is to avoid cost, and you encounter it.

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William Shakespeare

As flies to wanton boys, are we to the gods; they kill us for their sport.

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William Shakespeare

For I can raise no money by vile means.

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William Shakespeare

Time and the hour run through the roughest day.

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William Shakespeare

I will praise any man that will praise me.

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William Shakespeare

Is it not strange that desire should so many years outlive performance?

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William Shakespeare

The stroke of death is as a lover's pinch, which hurts and is desired.

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William Shakespeare

Such as we are made of, such we be.

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William Shakespeare

We are time's subjects, and time bids be gone.

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William Shakespeare

Neither a borrower nor a lender be.

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William Shakespeare

If you have tears, prepare to shed them now.

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William Shakespeare

'Tis one thing to be tempted, another thing to fall.

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William Shakespeare

He that is giddy thinks the world turns round.

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William Shakespeare

We are such stuff as dreams are made on; and our little life is rounded with a sleep.

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William Shakespeare

Death is a fearful thing.

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William Shakespeare

He does it with better grace, but I do it more natural.

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William Shakespeare

I never see thy face but I think upon hell-fire.

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William Shakespeare

Do not be like the cat who wanted a fish but was afraid to get his paws wet.

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William Shakespeare

Nothing can come of nothing.

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William Shakespeare

O' What may man within him hide, though angel on the outward side!

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William Shakespeare

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

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William Shakespeare

In a false quarrel there is no true valor.

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William Shakespeare

Many a good hanging prevents a bad marriage.

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William Shakespeare

Men shut their doors against a setting sun.

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William Shakespeare

Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge.

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William Shakespeare

It is my soul that calls upon my name; How silver-sweet sound lovers' tongues by night, like softest music to attending ears! -Romeo

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William Shakespeare

Most dangerous is that temptation that doth goad us on to sin in loving virtue.

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William Shakespeare

O God, O God, how weary, stale, flat, and unprofitable seem to me all the uses of this world!

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William Shakespeare

There's not a note of mine that's worth the noting.

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William Shakespeare

What, man, defy the devil. Consider, he's an enemy to mankind.

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William Shakespeare

Fortune brings in some boats that are not steered.

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William Shakespeare

Farewell, fair cruelty.

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William Shakespeare

O! for a muse of fire, that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention.

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William Shakespeare

'Tis best to weigh the enemy more mighty than he seems.

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William Shakespeare

I dote on his very absence.

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William Shakespeare

There's place and means for every man alive.

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William Shakespeare

I like not fair terms and a villain's mind.

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William Shakespeare

Our peace shall stand as firm as rocky mountains.

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William Shakespeare

Truly, I would not hang a dog by my will, much more a man who hath any honesty in him.

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William Shakespeare

How well he's read, to reason against reading!

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William Shakespeare

Like as the waves make towards the pebbl'd shore, so do our minutes, hasten to their end.

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William Shakespeare

Mind your speech a little lest you should mar your fortunes.

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William Shakespeare

I shall the effect of this good lesson keeps as watchman to my heart.

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William Shakespeare

I was adored once too.

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William Shakespeare

I see that the fashion wears out more apparel than the man.

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William Shakespeare

'Tis better to bear the ills we have than fly to others that we know not of.

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William Shakespeare

I bear a charmed life.

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William Shakespeare

I were better to be eaten to death with a rust than to be scoured to nothing with perpetual motion.

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William Shakespeare

Lord, Lord, how subject we old men are to this vice of lying!

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William Shakespeare

My pride fell with my fortunes.

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William Shakespeare

For my part, it was Greek to me.

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William Shakespeare

Praise us as we are tasted, allow us as we prove.

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William Shakespeare

The attempt and not the deed confounds us.

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William Shakespeare

Let no such man be trusted.

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William Shakespeare

He that loves to be flattered is worthy o' the flatterer.

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William Shakespeare

How oft the sight of means to do ill deeds makes ill deeds done!

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William Shakespeare

Well, if Fortune be a woman, she's a good wench for this gear.

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William Shakespeare

He is winding the watch of his wit; by and by it will strike.

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William Shakespeare

They say miracles are past.

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William Shakespeare

O, had I but followed the arts!

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William Shakespeare

O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!

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William Shakespeare

So foul and fair a day I have not seen.

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William Shakespeare

There was never yet fair woman but she made mouths in a glass.

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William Shakespeare

Glory is like a circle in the water, which never ceaseth to enlarge itself, till, by broad spreading, it disperse to naught.

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William Shakespeare

Use every man after his desert, and who should scape whipping?

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William Shakespeare

Death makes no conquest of this conqueror: For now he lives in fame, though not in life.

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William Shakespeare

Where every something, being blent together turns to a wild of nothing.

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William Shakespeare

Exceeds man's might: that dwells with the gods above.

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William Shakespeare

It will have blood, they say; blood will have blood.

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William Shakespeare

Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.

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William Shakespeare

Virtue itself scapes not calumnious strokes.

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William Shakespeare

What a piece of work is a man, how noble in reason, how infinite in faculties, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god.

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William Shakespeare

We cannot conceive of matter being formed of nothing, since things require a seed to start from... Therefore there is not anything which returns to nothing, but all things return dissolved into their elements.

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William Shakespeare

Celebrity is never more admired than by the negligent.

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William Shakespeare

Commit the oldest sins the newest kind of ways.

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William Shakespeare

Nothing can seem foul to those who win.

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William Shakespeare

That which is now a horse, even with a thought The rack dislimms, and makes it indistinct As water is in water

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William Shakespeare

Speak what we feel, not what we ought to say.

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William Shakespeare

My liege, and madam, to expostulate What majesty should be, what duty is, Why day is day, night night, and time is time, Were nothing but to waste night, day and time. Therefore, since brevity is the soul...

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William Shakespeare

The very instant I saw you, did My heart fly to your service; there resides To make me slave to it. ...mine unworthiness, that dare not offer What I desire to give, and much less take What I shall die...

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William Shakespeare

A light wife doth make a heavy husband.

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William Shakespeare

Refrain to-night; And that shall lend a kind of easiness To the next abstinence, the next more easy; For use almost can change the stamp of nature, And either master the devil or throw him out With wondrous...

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William Shakespeare

And gentlemen in England now-a-bed Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.

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William Shakespeare

My father's wit, and my mother's tongue, assist me!

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William Shakespeare

Make passionate my sense of hearing.

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William Shakespeare

Where souls do couch on flowers we’ll hand in hand...

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William Shakespeare

The worm is not to be trusted...

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William Shakespeare

Good wombs have borne bad sons." -- (Miranda, I:2)

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William Shakespeare

Every cloud engenders not a storm.

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William Shakespeare

Well-apparel'd April on the heel Of limping Winter treads.

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William Shakespeare

Virtue and genuine graces in themselves speak what no words can utter.

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William Shakespeare

Care for us! True, indeed! They ne'er cared for us yet: suffer us to famish, and their storehouses crammed with grain; make edicts for usury, to support usurers; repeal daily any wholesome act established...

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William Shakespeare

I kissed thee ere I killed thee. No way but this, Killing myself, to die upon a kiss.

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William Shakespeare

Daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty.

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William Shakespeare

There lives within the very flame of love A kind of wick or snuff that will abate it.

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William Shakespeare

A knavish speech sleeps in a fool's ear.

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William Shakespeare

These violent delights have violent ends And in their triumph die, like fire and powder, Which as they kiss consume. The sweetest honey Is loathsome in his own deliciousness And in the taste confounds...

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William Shakespeare

Keep thy foot out of brothels, thy hand out of plackets, thy pen from lender's books, and defy the foul fiend.

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William Shakespeare

Bell, book and candle shall not drive me back, When gold and silver becks me to come on.

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William Shakespeare

I'll have no husband, if you be not he.

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William Shakespeare

I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid, on a dolphin's back, Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song; And certain stars shot madly from their...

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William Shakespeare

Men must endure Their going hence, even as their coming hither. Ripeness is all.

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William Shakespeare

And some that smile have in their hearts, I fear, millions of mischiefs.

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William Shakespeare

I am not yet of Percy's mind, the Hotspur of the North; he that kills me some six or seven dozen of Scots as a breakfast, washes his hands, and says to his wife, 'Fie upon this quiet life! I want work.

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William Shakespeare

Where shall we three meet again in thunder, lightning, or in rain? When the hurlyburly 's done, when the battle 's lost and won

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William Shakespeare

Pardon's the word to all.

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William Shakespeare

Laughing faces do not mean that there is absence of sorrow! But it means that they have the ability to deal with it

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William Shakespeare

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May.

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William Shakespeare

Of all the flowers, me thinks a rose is best.

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William Shakespeare

To go to bed after midnight is to go to bed betimes

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William Shakespeare

No longer mourn for me when I am dead than you shall hear the surly sullen bell give warning to the world that I am fled from this vile world with vilest worms to dwell: nay, if you read this line, remember...

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William Shakespeare

I am very proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more offences at my beck than I have thoughts to put them in, imagination to give them shape, or time to act them in.

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William Shakespeare

And what’s he then that says I play the villain?

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William Shakespeare

Come, woo me, woo me, for now I am in a holiday humor, and like enough to consent.

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William Shakespeare

Comfort's in heaven, and we are on the earth

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William Shakespeare

I have supped full with horrors.

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William Shakespeare

Blood will have blood.

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William Shakespeare

O, full of scorpions is my mind!

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William Shakespeare

A little more than kin, a little less than kind.

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William Shakespeare

This tyrant, whose sole name blisters our tongues,Was once thought honest.

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William Shakespeare

Small cheer and great welcome makes a merry feast.

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William Shakespeare

Thou know'st 'tis common; all that lives must die, Passing through nature to eternity.

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William Shakespeare

Under loves heavy burden do I sink. --Romeo

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William Shakespeare

People usually are the happiest at home.

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William Shakespeare

Don't judge a man's conscience by looking at his face cause he may have a bad heart.

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William Shakespeare

Fondling,' she saith, 'since I have hemm'd thee here Within the circuit of this ivory pale, I'll be a park, and thou shalt be my deer; Feed where thou wilt, on mountain or in dale: Graze on my lips, and...

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William Shakespeare

A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!

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William Shakespeare

As I love the name of honour more than I fear death.

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William Shakespeare

Beware the leader who bangs the drums of war in order to whip the citizenry into a patriotic fervor.

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William Shakespeare

Thou art as wise as thou art beautiful

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William Shakespeare

Oh why rebuke you him that loves you so? / Lay breath so bitter on your bitter foe.

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William Shakespeare

Write till your ink be dry, and with your tears Moist it again, and frame some feeling line That may discover such integrity.

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William Shakespeare

Now let it work. Mischief, thou art afoot. Take thou what course thou wilt.

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William Shakespeare

For I am he am born to tame you, Kate; and bring you from a wild Kate to a Kate conformable as other household Kates.

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William Shakespeare

Tis the mind that makes the body rich.

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William Shakespeare

I dreamt my lady came and found me dead . . . . . . . . . . . . And breathed such life with kisses in my lips That I revived and was an emperor.

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William Shakespeare

Trifles light as air are to the jealous confirmations strong as proofs of holy writ.

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William Shakespeare

O, train me not, sweet mermaid, with thy note, to drown me in thy sister’s flood of tears.

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William Shakespeare

Words to deeds cold breath gives.

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William Shakespeare

Journeys end in lovers meeting.

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William Shakespeare

I'll not meddle with it. It makes a man a coward: a man cannot steal but it accuseth him; a man cannot swear but it checks him; a man cannot lie with his neighbor's wife but it detects him. 'Tis a blushing,...

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William Shakespeare

Love goes toward love as schoolboys from their books, But love from love, toward school with heavy looks.

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William Shakespeare

For it falls out That what we have we prize not to the worth Whiles we enjoy it, but being lacked and lost, Why, then we rack the value, then we find The virtue that possession would not show us While...

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William Shakespeare

This senior-junior, giant-dwarf, Dan Cupid; Regent of love-rhymes, lord of folded arms, The anointed sovereign of sighs and groans, Liege of all loiterers and malcontents.

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William Shakespeare

Are you sure/That we are awake? It seems to me/That yet we sleep, we dream

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William Shakespeare

O,speak to me no more;these words like daggers enter my ears.(a fancy way of saying SHUT UP!)" — William Shakespeare "hamlet

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William Shakespeare

You lie, in faith; for you are call'd plain Kate, And bonny Kate and sometimes Kate the curst; But Kate, the prettiest Kate in Christendom Kate of Kate Hall, my super-dainty Kate, For dainties are all...

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William Shakespeare

You see me here, you gods, a poor old man, As full of grief as age; wretched in both.

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William Shakespeare

Orpheus with his lute made trees, And the mountain tops that freeze, Bow themselves, when he did sing; To his music, plants and flowers Ever sprung; as sun and showers There had made a lasting spring....

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William Shakespeare

Aand in the end, Having my freedom, boast of nothing else But that I was a journeyman to grief?

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William Shakespeare

Patch grief with proverbs.

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William Shakespeare

Men's eyes were made to look, let them gaze, I will budge for no man's pleasure.

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William Shakespeare

Sorrow breaks seasons and reposing hours, Makes the night morning, and the noontide night.

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William Shakespeare

No, no; 'tis all men's office to speak patience To those that wring under the load of sorrow, But no man's virtue nor sufficiency To be so moral when he shall endure The like himself. Therefore give me...

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William Shakespeare

I go, I go, look how I go, swifter than an arrow from a bow

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William Shakespeare

POLONIUS: What do you read, my lord? HAMLET: Words, words, words.

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William Shakespeare

Fair is foul, and foul is fair, hover through fog and filthy air.

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William Shakespeare

The king hath note of all that they intend, by interception which they dream not of.

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William Shakespeare

In delay there lies no plenty.

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William Shakespeare

There are many events in the womb of time which will be delivered.

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William Shakespeare

Delay leads impotent and snail-paced beggary.

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William Shakespeare

When devils will the blackest sins put on They do suggest at first with heavenly shows

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William Shakespeare

Too nice, and yet too true!

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William Shakespeare

Ay, but to die and go we know not where; To lie in cold obstrution and to rot; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods or to reside In thrilling...

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William Shakespeare

O comfort-killing night, image of hell, Dim register and notary of shame, Black stage for tragedies and murders fell, Vast sin-concealing chaos, nurse of blame!

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William Shakespeare

Don Pedro - (...)'In time the savage bull doth bear the yoke.' Benedick - The savage bull may, but if ever the sensible Benedick bear it, pluck off the bull's horns and set them in my forehead, and let...

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William Shakespeare

I have drunk and seen the spider.

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William Shakespeare

Lovers and madmen have such seething brains Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend More than cool reason ever comprehends.

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William Shakespeare

Beauty's a doubtful good, a glass, a flower, Lost, faded, broken, dead within an hour; And beauty, blemish'd once, for ever's lost, In spite of physic, painting, pain, and cost.

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William Shakespeare

How much salt water thrown away in waste/ To season love, that of it doth not taste.

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William Shakespeare

Grief makes one hour ten.

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William Shakespeare

Cry "havoc!" and let loose the dogs of war, That this foul deed shall smell above the earth With carrion men, groaning for burial.

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William Shakespeare

to early seen unknown...and known to late

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William Shakespeare

Fare thee well, king: sith thus thou wilt appear, Freedom lives hence, and banishment is here.

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William Shakespeare

O, here Will I set up my everlasting rest, And shake the yoke of inauspicious stars From this world-wearied flesh. Eyes, look your last! Arms, take your last embrace! and, lips, O you The doors of breath,...

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William Shakespeare

Too much of water hast thou, poor Ophelia, And therefore I forbid my tears.

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William Shakespeare

Heaven - the treasury of everlasting life.

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William Shakespeare

Were kisses all the joys in bed, One woman would another wed.

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William Shakespeare

I understand thy kisses, and thou mine, And that's a feeling disputation.

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William Shakespeare

He took the bride about the neck and kissed her lips with such a clamorous smack that at the parting all the church did echo.

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William Shakespeare

Can we outrun the heavens?

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William Shakespeare

It is thyself, mine own self's better part; Mine eye's clear eye, my dear heart's dearer heart; My food, my fortune, and my sweet hope's aim, My sole earth's heaven, and my heaven's claim.

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William Shakespeare

Heaven take my soul, and England keep my bones!

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William Shakespeare

For trust not him that hath once broken faith

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William Shakespeare

O, Thou hast damnable iteration; and art, indeed, able to corrupt a saint.

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William Shakespeare

There live not three good men unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and grows old.

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William Shakespeare

A man can die but once.

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William Shakespeare

Go, bid the soldiers shoot.

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William Shakespeare

I will kill thee a hundred and fifty ways.

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William Shakespeare

Upon his royal face there is no note how dread an army hath enrounded him.

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William Shakespeare

Here I and sorrows sit; Here is my throne, bid kings come bow to it.

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William Shakespeare

O God, that men should put an enemy in their mouths to steal away their brains!" - Cassio (Act II, Scene iii)

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William Shakespeare

To whom God will, there be the victory.

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William Shakespeare

I'll fight, till from my bones my flesh be hacked.

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William Shakespeare

Fight to the last gasp.

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William Shakespeare

Come the three corners of the world in arms, and we shall shock them.

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William Shakespeare

We are ready to try our fortunes to the last man.

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William Shakespeare

A victory is twice itself when the achiever brings home full numbers.

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William Shakespeare

Though authority be a stubborn bear, yet he is oft let by the nose with gold.

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William Shakespeare

I am a great eater of beef, and I believe that does harm to my wit.

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William Shakespeare

We will have rings and things and fine array

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William Shakespeare

How low am I, thou painted maypole? (Hermia to Helena)

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William Shakespeare

O for a horse with wings!

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William Shakespeare

He doth nothing but talk of his horses.

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William Shakespeare

Violent fires soon burn out themselves, small showers last long, but sudden storms are short; he tires betimes that spurs too fast.

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William Shakespeare

His neigh is like the bidding of a monarch, and his countenance enforces homage. He is indeed a horse...

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William Shakespeare

Look, what a horse should have he did not lack, Save a proud rider on his back.

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William Shakespeare

Well could he ride, and often men would say, "That horse his mettle from his rider takes: Proud of subjection, noble by the sway, What rounds, what bounds, what course, what stop he makes!" And controversy...

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William Shakespeare

...Vaulted with such ease into his seat, As if an angel dropp'd down from the clouds, To turn and wind a fiery Pegasus, And witch the world with noble horsemanship.

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William Shakespeare

Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief That thou, her maid, art far more fair than she. . . .

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William Shakespeare

Death is my son-in-law. Death is my heir. My daughter he hath wedded. I will die, And leave him all. Life, living, all is Death’s.

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William Shakespeare

And by that destiny to perform an act Whereof what's past is prologue, what to come In yours and my discharge.

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William Shakespeare

Let life be short, else shame will be too long.

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William Shakespeare

O for a Muse of fire, that would ascend The brightest heaven of invention, A kingdom for a stage, princes to act And monarchs to behold the swelling scene!

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William Shakespeare

The lowest ebb is the turn of the tide. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow We are such stuff as dreams are made of.

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William Shakespeare

We suffer a lot the few things we lack and we enjoy too little the many things we have.

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William Shakespeare

Present mirth hath present laughter. What's to come is still unsure.

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William Shakespeare

For I have neither wit, nor words, nor worth, Action, nor utterance, nor the power of speech, To stir men’s blood: I only speak right on; I tell you that which you yourselves do know;

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William Shakespeare

How my achievements mock me!

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William Shakespeare

Foolery, sir, does walk about the orb like the sun; it shines everywhere.

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William Shakespeare

...and then, in dreaming, / The clouds methought would open and show riches / Ready to drop upon me, that when I waked / I cried to dream again.

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William Shakespeare

A grandma's name is little less in love than is the doting title of a mother.

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William Shakespeare

O polished perturbation! golden care! That keep'st the ports of slumber open wide To many a watchful night.

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William Shakespeare

A happy ending cannot come in the middle of the story

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William Shakespeare

Kindness in women, not their beauteous looks, Shall win my love.

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William Shakespeare

Why should you think that I should woo in scorn? Scorn and derision never come in tears: Look, when I vow, I weep; and vows so born, In their nativity all truth appears. How can these things in me seem...

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William Shakespeare

And therefore is love said to be a child, Because in choice he is so oft beguil'd

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William Shakespeare

We cannot fight for love, as men may do; we shou'd be woo'd, and were not made to woo

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William Shakespeare

So far be distant; and good night, sweet friend: thy love ne'er alter, till they sweet life end

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William Shakespeare

Say, thou art mine; and ever, My love, as it begins, shall so persevere

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William Shakespeare

Hereafter, in a better world than this, I shall desire more love and knowledge of you

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William Shakespeare

Love, which teacheth me that thou and I am one

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William Shakespeare

If thou remeber'st not the slightest folly that ever love did make thee run into, thou hast not lov'd

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William Shakespeare

Let me twine Mine arms about that body, where against My grained ash an hundred times hath broke And scarr'd the moon with splinters: here I clip The anvil of my sword, and do contest As hotly and as nobly...

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William Shakespeare

I know no ways to mince it in love, but directly to say - I love you

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William Shakespeare

I love you more than word can wield the matter, Dearer than eye-sight, space and liberty

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William Shakespeare

By Heaven, my soul is purg'd from grudging hate; And with my hand I seal my true heart's love

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William Shakespeare

What? do I love her, that I desire to hear her speak again, and feast upon her eyes

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William Shakespeare

Oh, injurious love, that respites me a life, whose very comfort is still a dying horror

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William Shakespeare

I have pursued her, as love hath pursued me

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William Shakespeare

What made me love thee? let that persuade thee, there's something extraordinary in thee

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William Shakespeare

I love thee; none but thee, and thou deservest it

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William Shakespeare

Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still, Should without eyes see pathways to his will!

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William Shakespeare

This bud of love, by summer's ripening breath, May prove a beauteous flower when next we meet

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William Shakespeare

With love's light wings did I o'er-perch these walls, for stony limits cannot hold love out

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William Shakespeare

By Heaven, I love thee better than myself

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William Shakespeare

Is it possible that love should of a sudden take such a hold?

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William Shakespeare

I love thee, and it is my love that speaks

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William Shakespeare

Ere I could make thee open thy white hand, and clap thyself my love; then didst thou utter, I am your's for ever!

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William Shakespeare

Thou ever young, fresh, lov'd, and delicate wooer, whose blush doth thaw the consecrated snow

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William Shakespeare

And, if you love me, as I think you do, let's kiss and part, for we have much to do

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William Shakespeare

O, spirit of love, how quick and fresh art thou!

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William Shakespeare

To be in love, where scorn is bought with groans; coy looks, with heart-sore sighs; one fading moment's mirth

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William Shakespeare

Sweet love! Sweet lines! Sweet life! Here is her hand, the agent of her heart; Here is her oath for love, her honour's pawn

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William Shakespeare

I have lov'd her ever since I saw her; and still I see her beautiful

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William Shakespeare

a girl takes too much time to love and a few seconds to hate. but a boy takes a few seconds to love and too much time to hate.

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William Shakespeare

For love, thou know'st, is full of jealousy

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William Shakespeare

My love is thaw'd; Which, like a waxen image 'gainst a fire, bears no impression of the thing it was

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William Shakespeare

Things in motion sooner catch the eye than what not stirs.

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William Shakespeare

The quality of mercy is not strained

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William Shakespeare

I take thee at thy word: Call me but love, and I'll be new baptized; Henceforth I never will be Romeo.

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William Shakespeare

Good friend for Jesus sake forbeare, To digg the dust encloased heare! Blest be the man that spares thes stones, And curst be he that moves my bones.

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William Shakespeare

I could a tale unfold whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul, freeze thy young blood, Make thy two eyes like stars start from their spheres, Thy knotted and combined locks to part, And each particular...

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William Shakespeare

By heaven, I'll make a ghost of him that lets me.

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William Shakespeare

The earth has music for those that listen.

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William Shakespeare

Benvolio- "By my head, here come the Capulets." Mercutio- "By my heel, I care not.

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William Shakespeare

The head is not more native to the heart.

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William Shakespeare

A man may fish with the worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of the fish that hath fed of that worm

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William Shakespeare

What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her?

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William Shakespeare

Happy are those who hear their detractions and can put them to mending.

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William Shakespeare

Why, what is pomp, rule, reign, but earth and dust? And, live we how we can, yet die we must.

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William Shakespeare

His forward voice now is to speak well of his friend. His backward voice is to utter foul speeches and to detract.

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William Shakespeare

Alack, there lies more peril in thine eye Than twenty of their swords: look thou but sweet, And I am proof against their enmity.

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William Shakespeare

Tis our fast intent To shake all cares and business from our age, Conferring them on younger strengths, while we Unburdened crawl toward death.

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William Shakespeare

I will be brief. Your noble son is mad.

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William Shakespeare

To think but nobly of my grandmother: Good wombs have borne bad sons.

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William Shakespeare

I have a kind soul that would give you thanks. And knows not how to do it but with tears.

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William Shakespeare

For grief is crowned with consolation.

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William Shakespeare

Thanks, sir; all the rest is mute.

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William Shakespeare

The bashful virgin's sidelong looks of love, The matron's glance that would those looks reprove.

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William Shakespeare

You are my true and honourable wife; As dear to me as the ruddy drops That visit my sad heart.

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William Shakespeare

O, what damned minutes tells he o'er Who dotes, yet doubts, suspects, yet fondly loves!

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William Shakespeare

No .... holy father, throw away that thought. Believe not that the dribbling dart of love Can pierce a complete bosom.

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William Shakespeare

Thyself and thy belongings Are not thine own so proper, as to waste Thyself upon thy virtues, they on thee. Heaven doth with us as we with torches do, Not light them for themselves; for if our virtues Did...

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William Shakespeare

There's neither honesty, manhood, nor good fellowship in thee.

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William Shakespeare

Striving to better, oft we mar what’s well.

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William Shakespeare

Good company, good wine, good welcome, can make good people.

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William Shakespeare

If I were a woman I would kiss as many of you as had beards that pleased me, complexions that liked me and breaths that I defied not

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William Shakespeare

Now, neighbor confines, purge you of your scum! Have you a ruffian that will swear, drink, dance, revel the night, rob, murder, and commit the oldest sins the newest kind of ways?

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William Shakespeare

Receive what cheer you may. The night is long that never finds the day.

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William Shakespeare

Nothing in his life became him like leaving it.

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William Shakespeare

Never Play With The Feelings Of Others, Because You May Win The Game But The Risk Is That You Will Surely Lose The Person For Life Time

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William Shakespeare

What we determine we often break. Purpose is but the slave to memory.

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William Shakespeare

The dullness of the fool is the whetstone of the wits.

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William Shakespeare

He's a soldier; and for one to say a soldier lies, is stabbing.

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William Shakespeare

Dream in light years, challenge miles, walk step by step

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William Shakespeare

My language! heavens!I am the best of them that speak this speech. Were I but where 'tis spoken.

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William Shakespeare

Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounc'd it to you, trippingly on the tongue.

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William Shakespeare

Ay, is it not a language I speak?

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William Shakespeare

Then is it sin to rush into the secret house of death. Ere death dare come to us?

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William Shakespeare

Lady, with me, with me thy fortune lies.

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William Shakespeare

Which means she to deceive, father or mother?

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William Shakespeare

When the sea was calm all ships alike showed mastership in floating.

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William Shakespeare

Lord, Lord, how this world is given to lying!

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William Shakespeare

It is silliness to live when to live is torment.

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William Shakespeare

A pox o’ your throat, you bawling, blasphemous, incharitable dog!

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William Shakespeare

Many can brook the weather that love not the wind.

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William Shakespeare

When love begins to sicken and decay it uses an enforced ceremony.

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William Shakespeare

To business that we love we rise betime, and go to't with delight.

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William Shakespeare

Let me confess that we two must be twain, although our undivided loves are one.

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William Shakespeare

A gentleman that loves to hear himself talk, will speak more in a minute than he will stand to in a month.

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William Shakespeare

O world, world! thus is the poor agent despised. O traitors and bawds, how earnestly are you set a-work, and how ill requited! Why should our endeavor be so loved, and the performance so loathed?

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William Shakespeare

Some men there are love not a gaping pig, some that are mad if they behold a cat, and others when the bagpipe sings I the nose cannot contain their urine.

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William Shakespeare

I am bewitched with the rogue's company. If the rascal have not given me medicines to make me love him, I'll be hanged.

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William Shakespeare

Antonio: Will you stay no longer? nor will you not that I go with you? Sebastian: By your patience, no. My stars shine darkly over me; the malignancy of my fate might, perhaps, distemper yours; therefore...

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William Shakespeare

I can hardly forbear hurling things at him.

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William Shakespeare

When great leaves fall, the winter is at hand.

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William Shakespeare

Flout 'em, and scout 'em; and scout 'em, and flout 'em; / Thought is free.

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William Shakespeare

This is the very coinage of your brain: this bodiless creation ecstasy.

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William Shakespeare

For Brutus, as you know, was Caesar's angel: Judge, O you gods, how dearly Caesar loved him! This was the most unkindest cut of all

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William Shakespeare

It is the mind that makes the body rich; and as the sun breaks through the darkest clouds, so honor peereth in the meanest habit.

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William Shakespeare

Hot blood begets hot thoughts, And hot thoughts beget Hot deeds, And hot deeds is love.

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William Shakespeare

All the world's a stage.

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William Shakespeare

Golden lads and girls all must as chimney sweepers come to dust.

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William Shakespeare

Lay on, McDuff, and be damned he who first cries, 'Hold, enough!

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William Shakespeare

Good counselors lack no clients.

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William Shakespeare

Beauty is but a vain and doubtful good; a shining gloss that fadeth suddenly; a flower that dies when it begins to bud; a doubtful good, a gloss, a glass, a flower, lost, faded, broken, dead within an...

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William Shakespeare

I durst not laugh for fear of opening my lips and receiving the bad air.

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William Shakespeare

Devoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep; To sleep, perchance to dream—For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,When we have shuffled off this mortal coil, Must give us pause, there's the respect,...

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William Shakespeare

One may smile, and smile, and be a villain.

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William Shakespeare

When holy and devout religious men are at their beads, 'tis hard to draw them thence; so sweet is zealous contemplation.

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William Shakespeare

Thou seest I have more flesh than another man, and therefore more frailty.

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William Shakespeare

Good with out evil is like light with out darkness which in turn is like righteousness whith out hope.

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William Shakespeare

where civil blood makes civil hands unclean

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William Shakespeare

Tam: What begg’st thou then? fond woman, let me go. Lav: ’Tis present death I beg; and one thing more That womanhood denies my tongue to tell. O! keep me from their worse than killing lust, And tumble...

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William Shakespeare

For who so firm that cannot be seduced?

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William Shakespeare

We are advertis'd by our loving friends.

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William Shakespeare

Who knows himself a braggart, Let him fear this; for it will come to pass That every braggart will be found an ass.

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William Shakespeare

The labor we delight in physics [cures] pain.

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William Shakespeare

For precious friends hid in death's dateless night.

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William Shakespeare

By medicine life may be prolonged, yet death will seize the doctor too.

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William Shakespeare

Those that much covet are with gain so fond, For what they have not, that which they possess They scatter and unloose it from their bond, And so, by hoping more, they have but less; Or, gaining more, the...

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William Shakespeare

If fortune torments me, hope contents me.

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William Shakespeare

Care is no cure, but rather corrosive, For things that are not to be remedied.

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William Shakespeare

They love least that let men know their loves.

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William Shakespeare

Macduff: What three things does drink especially provoke? Porter: Marry, sir, nose-painting, sleep, and urine.

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William Shakespeare

He hath not eat paper, as it were; he hath not drunk ink; his intellect is not replenished; he is only an animal, only sensible in the duller parts. (Shakespeare, Love's Labor's Lost, IV)

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William Shakespeare

When daisies pied and violets blue And lady-smocks all silver-white And cuckoo-buds of yellow hue Do paint the meadows with delight, The cuckoo then, on every tree, Mocks married men; for thus sings he,...

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William Shakespeare

ROSS You must have patience, madam. LADY MACDUFF He had none: His flight was madness: when our actions do not, Our fears do make us traitors.

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William Shakespeare

. . . yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great; Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it: what thou...

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William Shakespeare

Gives not the hawthorn bush a sweeter shade To shepherds, looking on their silly sheep, Than doth a rich embroider'd canopy To kings that fear their subjects treachery?

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William Shakespeare

The fear's as bad as falling.

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William Shakespeare

There is an old poor man,. . . . Oppress'd with two weak evils, age and hunger.

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William Shakespeare

For which of my bad parts didst thou first fall in love with me?

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William Shakespeare

I do love nothing in the world so well as you- is not that strange?

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William Shakespeare

This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England.

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William Shakespeare

There is nothing serious in Mortality

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William Shakespeare

That skull had a tongue in it, and could sing once: how the knave jowls it to the ground, as if it were Cain's jaw-bone, that did the first murder! It might be the pate of a politician, which this ass...

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William Shakespeare

Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me, Puts on his pretty look, repeats his words, Remembers me of his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with...

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William Shakespeare

T'is true: there's magic in the web of it...

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William Shakespeare

But if the while I think on thee, dear friend, All losses are restored and sorrows end.

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William Shakespeare

It is a good divine that follows his own instructions.

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William Shakespeare

Sycorax has grown into a hoop

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William Shakespeare

To be a well-favoured man is the gift of fortune; but to write and read comes by nature.

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William Shakespeare

O powerful love, that in some respects makes a beast a man, in some other, a man a beast.

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William Shakespeare

What is your substance, whereof are you made, That millions of strange shadows on you tend? Since everyone hath every one, one shade, And you, but one, can every shadow lend. Describe Adonis, and the counterfeit...

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William Shakespeare

And his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love.

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William Shakespeare

The love that follows us sometime is our trouble, which still we thank as love.

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William Shakespeare

When most I wink, then do my eyes best see

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William Shakespeare

I am not mad; I would to heaven I were! For then, 'tis like I should forget myself; O, if I could, what grief should I forget!

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William Shakespeare

O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, / That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!

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William Shakespeare

Stars hide your fires; let not light see my black and deep desires: The eyes wink at the hand; yet let that be which the eye fears, when it is done, to see

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William Shakespeare

Few love to hear the sins they love to act.

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William Shakespeare

Give me that man that is not passion's slave, and I will wear him in my heart's core, in my heart of heart, as I do thee.

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William Shakespeare

When lenity and cruelty play for a kingdom, the gentler gamester is the soonest winner

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William Shakespeare

One half of me is yours, the other half is yours, Mine own, I would say; but if mine, then yours, And so all yours.

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William Shakespeare

The one I love is the son of the one I hate! -Juliet p. 75

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William Shakespeare

I never yet did hear, That the bruis'd heart was pierced through the ear

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William Shakespeare

He is as full of valor as of kindness. Princely in both.

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William Shakespeare

Every subject's duty is the King's; but every subject's soul is his own. Therefore, should every soldier in the wars do as every sick man in his bed, wash every mote out of his conscience; and dying so,...

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