Pliny the Elder quote

"Contact with [menstrual blood] turns new wine sour, crops touched by it become barren, grafts die, seed in gardens are dried up, the fruit of trees fall off, the edge of steel and the gleam of ivory are dulled, hives of bees die, even bronze and iron are at once seized by rust, and a horrible smell fills the air; to taste it drives dogs mad and infects their bites with an incurable poison."

Pliny the Elder

Born: 23

Die: August 25, 79

Occupation: Author

Comment

More quotes of Pliny the Elder

Pliny the Elder

The agricultural population, says Cato, produces the bravest men, the most valiant soldiers, and a class of citizens the least given of all too evil designs.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The great business of man is to improve his mind, and govern his manners; all other projects and pursuits, whether in our power to compass or not, are only amusements.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The happier the moment the shorter.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Nature has given man no better thing than shortness of life.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The ancients had little doubt about the true shape of the earth: "It's [the world's] shape has the rounded appearance of a perfect sphere. This is shown first of all by the name of 'orb' which is bestowed...

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Home is where the heart is.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Hope is the pillar that holds up the world. Hope is the dream of a waking man.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The depth of darkness to which you can descend and still live is an exact measure of the height to which you can aspire to reach.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

From the end spring new beginnings.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

An object in possession seldom retains the same charm that it had in pursuit.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Grief has limits, whereas apprehension has none. For we grieve only for what we know has happened, but we fear all that possibly may happen.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Such is the audacity of man, that he hath learned to counterfeit Nature, yea, and is so bold as to challenge her in her work.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

In these matters the only certainty is that nothing is certain.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

It is generally much more shameful to lose a good reputation than never to have acquired it.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

No mortal man, moreover is wise at all moments.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

In comparing various authors with one another, I have discovered that some of the gravest and latest writers have transcribed, word for word, from former works, without making acknowledgment.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

No one is wise at all times.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Let honor be to us as strong an obligation as necessity is to others.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The master's eye is the best fertilizer.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Our civilization depends largely on paper.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The only thing man knows instinctively is how to weep.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Contact with [menstrual blood] turns new wine sour, crops touched by it become barren, grafts die, seed in gardens are dried up, the fruit of trees fall off, the edge of steel and the gleam of ivory are...

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Nulla dies sine linea - Not a day without a line.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Among these things, one thing seems certain - that nothing certain exists and that there is nothing more pitiful or more presumptuous than man.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

There is no book so bad that some good can not be got out of it,

Read more


Pliny the Elder

In wine there is health (In vino sanitas)

Read more


Pliny the Elder

It has become quite a common proverb that in wine there is truth (In Vino Veritas).

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Made up of the glories of the most precious gems, to describe them is a matter of inexpressible difficulty. For there is amongst them the gentler fire of the ruby, there is the rich purple of the amethyst,...

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Honey comes out of the air At early dawn the leaves of trees are found bedewed with honey. Whether this is the perspiration of the sky or a sort of saliva of the stars, or the moisture of the air purging...

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Wine refreshes the stomach, sharpens the appetite, blunts care and sadness, and conduces to slumber.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The leading distinction of magnets is sex... The kind that is found in Troas is black, and of the female sex, and consequently destitute of attractive power.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

With man, most of his misfortunes are occasioned by man.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Nature is to be found in her entirety nowhere more than in her smallest creatures.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The best kind of wine is that which is most pleasant to him who drinks it.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The enjoyments of this life are not equal to its evils.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Amid the sufferings of life on earth, suicide is God's best gift to man.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

True glory consists in doing what deserves to be written, and writing what deserves to be read.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The largest land animal is the elephant, and it is the nearest to man in intelligence: it understands the language of its country and obeys orders, remembers duties that it has been taught, is pleased...

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Suicide is a privilege of man which deity does not possess.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The lust of avarice as so totally seized upon mankind that their wealth seems rather to possess them than they possess their wealth.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

There is, to be sure, no evil without something good.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

When collapse is imminent, the little rodents flee.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

When a building is about to fall down, all the mice desert it.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The brain is the highest of the organs in position, and it is protected by the vault of the head; it has no flesh or blood or refuse. It is the citadel of sense-perception.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

....shellfish are the prime cause of the decline of morals and the adaptation of an extravagant lifestyle.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

His only fault is that he has no fault.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The javelin-snake amphiptere hurls itself from the branches of trees.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The best plan is to profit by the folly of others.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The only certainty is uncertainty

Read more


Pliny the Elder

The most disgraceful cause of the scarcity [of remedies] is that even those who know them do not want to point them out, as if they were going to lose what they pass on to others.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

Human nature is fond of novelty.

Read more


Pliny the Elder

In wine, there's truth.

Read more



Related quote

Pliny the Elder

Contact with [menstrual blood] turns new wine sour, crops touched by it become barren, grafts die, seed in gardens are dried up, the fruit of trees fall off, the edge of steel and the gleam of ivory are...

Read more


Robert Jordan

Violence harms the one who does it as much as the one who receives it. You could cut down a tree with an axe. The axe does violence to the tree, and escapes unharmed. Is that how you see it? Wood is soft...

Read more


George Orwell

It struck him that in moments of crisis one is never fighting against an external enemy, but always against one’s own body... On the battlefield, in the torture chamber, on a sinking ship, the issues...

Read more


Sherrilyn Kenyon

Jealousy can’t sour someone to this extreme, can it? (Aiden) It can and it does. Believe me. I’ve seen a lot worse than this in my billion or so years of existence – the first murder man committed...

Read more


Dr. Seuss

Catch! calls the Once-ler. He lets something fall. It's a Truffula Seed. It's the last one of all! You're in charge of the last of the Truffula Seeds. And Truffula Trees are what everyone needs. Plant...

Read more


Gregory Palamas

Let none of you have a soul which is barren and without fruit. Let nobody be unloving or unreceptive to the spiritual seed. May each of you eagerly accept the celestial seed, the word of salvation (cf....

Read more


William Faulkner

They say love dies between two people. That’s wrong. It doesn’t die. It just leaves you, goes away, if you aren’t good enough, worthy enough. It doesn’t die; you’re the the one that dies. It’s...

Read more


Ray Bradbury

And there, row upon row, with the soft gleam of flowers opened at morning, with the light of this June sun glowing through a faint skin of dust, would stand the dandelion wine. Peer through it at the wintry...

Read more


Augusten Burroughs

So that's what I'm here to become. And suddenly, this word fills me with a brand of sadness I haven't felt since childhood. The kind of sadness you feel at the end of summer. When the fireflies are gone,...

Read more


Henry David Thoreau

Before the end of December, generally, they experience their first thawing. Those which a month ago were sour, crabbed, and quite unpalatable to the civilized taste, such at least as were frozen while...

Read more


Jon Ronson

Sometimes the personalities at the helm of the madness industry are, with their drives and obsessions, as mad in their own way as those they study. And that relatively ordinary people are, more and more,...

Read more


Helen Fisher

Women have a better sense of smell than men do, and it's even sharper in the middle of their menstrual cycle, when estrogen levels peak and women are more likely to be deciding whether a man's attractive.

Read more


Pierre Drieu La Rochelle

Suicide is the means of men whose resilience has been eaten away by rust, the rust of the daily round. They were born for action, but they have delayed their action; so action turns back on them with the...

Read more


Katie MacAlister

You taste of the cool water that hides deep in a stream. You taste of the night air, soft and scented and mysterious. The taste of you drives me wild. I want to be with you, be inside you, shout to the...

Read more


Robinson Jeffers

When the sun shouts and people abound One thinks there were the ages of stone and the age of bronze And the iron age; iron the unstable metal; Steel made of iron, unstable as his mother; the tow-ered-up...

Read more


Peter Mullan

There are some people who walk into a room and they oxygenate it, by their very being there's fresh air. Then there are those who come in with the smell of death and they suck the life out.

Read more


Matthew Scully

If we are defined by reason and morality, then reason and morality must define our choices, even when animals are concerned. When people say, for example, that they like their veal or hot dogs too much...

Read more


Martiros Saryan

Nature's ways are wonderful and unfathomable. The grain swells in the soil, the sprout grows and flowers when the time comes and then it bears new fruit and so does not die. We are like grain. We never...

Read more


Leo Tolstoy

Why does an apple fall when it is ripe? Is it brought down by the force of gravity? Is it because its stalk withers? Because it is dried by the sun, because it grows too heavy, or because the boy standing...

Read more


Vandana Shiva

I describe what is happening as 'food fascism' because this system can only survive through totalitarian control. With patents on seed, an illegitimate legal system is manipulated to create seed monopolies....

Read more


Walt Whitman

As for me, I know nothing else but miracles, Whether I walk the streets of Manhattan, Or dart my sight over the roofs of houses toward the sky, Or wade with naked feet along the beach just in the...

Read more


“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss