Emily Bronte quote

"But you might as well bid a man struggling in the water, rest within arm's length of the shore! I must reach it first, and then I'll rest."

Emily Bronte

Born: July 30, 1818

Die: December 19, 1848

Occupation: Novelist

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More quotes of Emily Bronte

Emily Bronte

I wish I could hold you,' she continued, bitterly, 'till we were both dead! I shouldn't care what you suffered. I care nothing for your sufferings. Why shouldn't you suffer? I do! Will you forget me? Will...

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Emily Bronte

Lines I die but when the grave shall press The heart so long endeared to thee When earthy cares no more distress And earthy joys are nought to me. Weep not, but think that I have past Before thee o'er...

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Emily Bronte

You're hard to please: so many friends and so few cares, and can't make yourself content.

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Emily Bronte

Joseph is the wearisomest and self-righteous Pharisee who ever ransacked the Bible to rake the promises to himself and fling the curses on his neighbor.

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Emily Bronte

I've no more business to marry Edgar Linton than I have to be in heaven and if the wicked man in there had not brought Heathcliff so low I shouldn't have thought of it. It would degrade me to marry Heathcliff...

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Emily Bronte

Vain are the thousand creeds That move men's hearts, unutterably vain; Worthless as withered weeds, Or idlest froth amid the boundless main.

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Emily Bronte

In secret pleasure — secret tears This changeful life has slipped away

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Emily Bronte

Though earth and man were gone, And suns and universes ceased to be, And Thou wert left alone, Every existence would exist in Thee.

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Emily Bronte

Tis moonlight, summer moonlight, All soft and still and fair; The solemn hour of midnight Breathes sweet thoughts everywhere, But most where trees are sending Their breezy boughs on high, Or...

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Emily Bronte

I ran to the children's room: their door was ajar, I saw they had never laid down, though it was past midnight; but they were calmer, and did not need me to console them. The little souls were comforting...

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Emily Bronte

He turned, as he spoke, a peculiar look in her direction, a look of hatred unless he has a most perverse set of facial muscles that will not, like those of other people, interpret the language of his soul.

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Emily Bronte

He might as well plant an oak in a flowerpot, and expect it to thrive, as imagine he can restore her to vigour in the soil of his shallow cares!

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Emily Bronte

By this curious turn of disposition I have gained the reputation of deliberate heartlessness; how undeserved, I alone can appreciate.

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Emily Bronte

Are you acquainted with the mood of mind in which, if you were seated alone, and the cat licking its kitten on the rug before you, you would watch the operation so intently that puss's neglect of one ear...

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Emily Bronte

Heaven did not seem to be my home; and I broke my heart with weeping to come back to earth; and the angels were so angry that they flung me out into the middle of the heath on the top of Wuthering Heights;...

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Emily Bronte

Cold inthe earthand the deepsnow piled abovethee, Far, far, removed, cold in the dreary grave! Have I forgot, my only Love, to love thee, Severed at last byTime's all-serving wave?

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Emily Bronte

My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods. Time will changeit,I'mwellaware, aswinterchangesthetrees. My Love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneatha source of little visible delight...

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Emily Bronte

Riches I hold in light esteem, And love I laugh to scorn, And lust of fame was but a dream That vanished with the morn. And if I pray, the only prayer That moves my lips for me Is, 'Leave the heart that...

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Emily Bronte

Cathy, this lamb of yours threatens like a bull!' he said. 'It is in danger of splitting its skull against my knuckles. By God! Mr. Linton, I'm mortally sorry that you are not worth knocking down!

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Emily Bronte

I lingered round them, under that benign sky; watched the moths fluttering among the heath and hare-bells; listened to the soft wind breathing through the grass; and wondered how anyone could ever imagine...

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Emily Bronte

And, even yet, I dare not let it languish, Dare not indulge in memory's rapturous pain; Once drinking deep of that divinest anguish, How could I seek the empty world again?

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Emily Bronte

I never told my love vocally still.

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Emily Bronte

Treachery and violence are spears pointed at both ends; they wound those who resort to them worse than their enemies.

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Emily Bronte

It is hard to forgive, and to look at those eyes, and feel those wasted hands,' he answered. 'Kiss me again; and don’t let me see your eyes! I forgive what you have done to me. I love my murderer—but...

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Emily Bronte

If I were in heaven, Nelly, I should be extremely miserable." "Because you are not fit to go there," I answered. "All sinners would be miserable in heaven.

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Emily Bronte

You loved me-then what right had you to leave me? What right-answer me-for the poor fancy you felt for Linton? Because misery and degradation, and death, and nothing that God or Satan could inflict would...

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Emily Bronte

I pray every night that I may live after him; because I would rather be miserable than that he should be — that proves I love him better than myself.

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Emily Bronte

Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.

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Emily Bronte

I have dreamed in my life, dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they have gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the color of my mind.

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Emily Bronte

Proud people breed sad sorrows for themselves.

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Emily Bronte

A person who has not done one half his day's work by ten o clock, runs a chance of leaving the other half undone.

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Emily Bronte

If I could I would always work in silence and obscurity, and let my efforts be known by their results.

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Emily Bronte

Honest people don't hide their deeds.

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Emily Bronte

I see heaven's glories shine and faith shines equal.

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Emily Bronte

Love is like the wild rose-briar; Friendship like the holly-tree. The holly is dark when the rose-briar blooms, but which will bloom most constantly?

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Emily Bronte

I am now quite cured of seeking pleasure in society, be it country or town. A sensible man ought to find sufficient company in himself.

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Emily Bronte

A good heart will help you to a bonny face, my lad and a bad one will turn the bonniest into something worse than ugly.

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Emily Bronte

The tyrant grinds down his slaves and they don't turn against him, they crush those beneath them.

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Emily Bronte

I cannot express it: but surely you and everybody have a notion that there is, or should be, an existence of yours beyond you.

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Emily Bronte

Any relic of the dead is precious, if they were valued living.

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Emily Bronte

Terror made me cruel.

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Emily Bronte

...he shall never know how I love him: and that, not because he's handsome, Nelly, but because he is more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same...

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Emily Bronte

I cannot love thee; thou 'rt worse than thy brother. Go, say thy prayers, child, and ask God's pardon. I doubt thy mother and I must rue that we ever reared thee!

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Emily Bronte

My love for Heathchiff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary.

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Emily Bronte

I've dreamt in my life dreams that have stayed with me ever after.

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Emily Bronte

That is how I'm loved! Well, never mind. That is not my Heathcliff. I shall love mine yet; and take him with me: he's in my soul.

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Emily Bronte

Last night, I was on the threshold of hell. To-day, I am within sight of my heaven. I have my eyes on it: hardly three feet to sever me!

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Emily Bronte

You know, I've had a bitter, hard life since I last heard your voice and if I've survived it's all because of you.

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Emily Bronte

I got the sexton, who was digging Linton’s grave, to remove the earth off her coffin lid, and I opened it. I thought, once, I would have stayed there, when I saw her face again—it is hers yet—he...

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Emily Bronte

Hereafter she is only my sister in name; not because I disown her, but because she has disowned me.

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Emily Bronte

He wanted all to lie in an ecstasy of peace; I wanted all to sparkle and dance in a glorious jubilee. I said his heaven would be only half alive; and he said mine would be drunk: I said I should fall asleep...

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Emily Bronte

You must forgive me, for I struggled only for you.

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Emily Bronte

Nelly, I am Heathcliff! He's always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.

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Emily Bronte

I have to remind myself to breathe -- almost to remind my heart to beat!

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Emily Bronte

And from the midst of cheerless gloom I passed to bright unclouded day.

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Emily Bronte

The clock strikes off the hollow half-hours of all the life that is left to you, one by one.

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Emily Bronte

I cannot live without my life! I cannot live without my soul!

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Emily Bronte

There is not room for Death, Nor atom that his might could render void: Thou - Thou art Being and Breath, And what Thou art may never be destroyed.

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Emily Bronte

You have been compelled to cultivate your reflective faculties for want of occasions for frittering away your life on silly trifles.

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Emily Bronte

She burned too bright for this world.

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Emily Bronte

Oh, I'm burning! I wish I were out of doors! I wish I were a girl again, half savage and hardy, and free... and laughing at injuries, not maddening under them! Why am I so changed?

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Emily Bronte

I gave him my heart, and he took and pinched it to death; and flung it back to me.

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Emily Bronte

A sensible man ought to find sufficient company in himself.

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Emily Bronte

The intense horror of nightmare came over me: I tried to draw back my arm, but the hand clung to it, and a most melancholy voice sobbed, 'Let me in - let me in!' 'Who are you?' I asked, struggling, meanwhile,...

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Emily Bronte

I take so little interest in my daily life, that I hardly remember to eat and drink.

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Emily Bronte

If you ever looked at me once with what I know is in you, I would be your slave.

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Emily Bronte

And there you see the distinction between our feelings: had he been in my place, and I in his, though I hated him with a hatred that turned my life to gall, I never would have raised a hand against him....

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Emily Bronte

The night is darkening round me, The wild winds coldly blow; But a tyrant spell has bound me And I cannot, cannot go. The giant trees are bending Their bare boughs weighed with snow; The storm is fast...

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Emily Bronte

No coward soul is mine, No trembler in the world's storm-troubled sphere...

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Emily Bronte

Yet I was a fool to fancy for a moment that she valued Edgar Linton's attachment more than mine -- If he love with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn't love as much in eighty years, as I could...

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Emily Bronte

I have no pity! I have no pity! The more worms writhe, the more I yearn to crush out their entrails! It is a moral teething, and I grind with greater energy, in proportion to the increase of pain.

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Emily Bronte

Hush, my darling! Hush, hush, Catherine! I'll stay. If he shot me so, I'd expire with a blessing on my lips.

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Emily Bronte

He'll love and hate equally under cover, and esteem it a species of impertinence to loved or hated again.

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Emily Bronte

If I had caused the cloud, it was my duty to make an effort to dispel it.

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Emily Bronte

He... was attached by ties stronger than reason could break -- chains, forged by habit, which it would be cruel to attempt to loosen.

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Emily Bronte

If rain drops were kisses, I'd send you showers. If hugs were seas, I'd send you oceans. And if love was a person I'd send you me! Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.

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Emily Bronte

No coward soul is mine.

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Emily Bronte

how cruel, your veins are full of ice-water and mine are boiling

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Emily Bronte

He leant his two elbows on his knees, and his chin on his hands and remained rapt in dumb meditation. On my inquiring the subject of his thoughts, he answered gravely 'I'm trying to settle how I shall...

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Emily Bronte

He had the hypocrisy to represent a mourner: and previous to following with Hareton, he lifted the unfortunate child on to the table and muttered, with peculiar gusto, 'Now, my bonny lad, you are mine!...

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Emily Bronte

Good words," I replied. "But deeds must prove it also; and after he is well, remember you don't forget resolutions formed in the hour of fear.

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Emily Bronte

A heaven so clear, an earth so calm, So sweet, so soft, so hushed an air; And, deepening still the dreamlike charm, Wild moor-sheep feeding everywhere.

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Emily Bronte

If he loved with all the powers of his puny being, he couldn't love as much in eighty years as I could in a day.

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Emily Bronte

She bounded before me, and returned to my side, and was off again like a young greyhound; and, at first, I found plenty of entertaiment in listening to the larks singing far and near; and enjoying the...

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Emily Bronte

The old church tower and garden wall Are black with autumn rain And dreary winds foreboding call The darkness down again

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Emily Bronte

The winter wind is loud and wild, Come close to me, my darling child; Forsake thy books, and mate less play; And, while the night is gathering grey, We'll talk its pensive hours away.

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Emily Bronte

It is astonishing how sociable I feel myself compared with him.

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Emily Bronte

May you not rest, as long as I am living. You said I killed you - haunt me, then.

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Emily Bronte

I wish I were a girl again, half-savage and hardy, and free.

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Emily Bronte

Every leaf speaks bliss to me, fluttering from the autumn tree.

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Emily Bronte

Wish and learn to smooth away the surly wrinkles, to raise your lids frankly, and change the fiends to confident, innocent angels, suspecting and doubting nothing, and always seeing friends where they...

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Emily Bronte

We must be for ourselves in the long run; the mild and generous are only more justly selfish than the domineering.

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Emily Bronte

Yes, as my swift days near their goal, 'tis all that I implore: In life and death a chainless soul, with courage to endure.

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Emily Bronte

I'm happiest when most away I can bear my soul from its home of clay On a windy night when the moon is bright And the eye can wander through worlds of light— When I am not and none beside— Nor earth...

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Emily Bronte

I'll be as dirty as I please, and I like to be dirty, and I will be dirty!

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Emily Bronte

Your presence is a moral poison that would contaminate the most virtuous

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Emily Bronte

Terror made me cruel; and finding it useless to attempt shaking the creature off, I pulled its wrist on to the broken pane, and rubbed it to and fro till the blood ran down and soaked the bedclothes...

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Emily Bronte

I have fled my country and gone to the heather.

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Emily Bronte

But you might as well bid a man struggling in the water, rest within arm's length of the shore! I must reach it first, and then I'll rest.

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Emily Bronte

Shall Earth no more inspire thee, Thou lonely dreamer now?

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Emily Bronte

If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.

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Emily Bronte

Oh, Cathy! Oh, my life! how can I bear it?" was the first sentence he uttered, in a tone that did not seek to disguise his despair. And now he stared at her so earnestly that I thought the very intensity...

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Emily Bronte

wondered how anyone could ever imagine unquiet slumbers, for the sleepers in that quiet earth.

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Emily Bronte

Be with me always - take any form - drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I can not live without my life! I can not live without my soul!

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Emily Bronte

He’s more myself than I am

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Emily Bronte

He had been content with daily labour and rough animal enjoyments, 'till Catherine crossed his path. Shame at her scorn, and hope of her approval, were his first prompts to higher pursuits; and, instead...

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Emily Bronte

Nay, you'll be ashamed of me everyday of your life," he answered; "and the more ashamed, the more you know me; and I cannot bide it.

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Emily Bronte

Earnsha was not to be civilized with a wish, and my young lady was no philosopher, and no paragon of patience; but both their minds tending to the same point - one loving and desiring to esteem, and the...

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Emily Bronte

Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same; and Linton's is as different as a moonbeam from lightning, or frost from fire

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Emily Bronte

Nonsense, do you imagine he has thought as much of you as you have of him?

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Emily Bronte

The night is darkening round me, The wild winds coldly blow; But a tyrant spell has bound me, And I cannot, cannot go.

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Emily Bronte

How strange! I thought, though everybody hated and despised each other, they could not avoid loving me.

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Emily Bronte

Proud people breed sad sorrows for themselves. But if you be afraid of your touchiness, you must ask pardon, mind, when she comes in.

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Emily Bronte

The entire world is a collection of memoranda that she did exist, and that I have lost her.

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Emily Bronte

I have lost the faculty of enjoying their destruction, and I am too idle to destroy for nothing.

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Emily Bronte

You have left me so long to struggle against death, alone, that I feel and see only death! I feel like death!

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Emily Bronte

The Lord help us!' he soliloquised in an undertone of peevish displeasure, while relieving me of my horse: looking, meantime, in my face so sourly that I charitably conjectured he must have need of divine...

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Emily Bronte

I will walk where my own nature would be leading.

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Emily Bronte

I'm wearying to escape into that glorious world, and to be always there; not seeing it dimly through tears, and yearning for it through the walls of an aching heart; but really with it, and in it.

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Emily Bronte

It is strange people should be so greedy, when they are alone in the world.

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Emily Bronte

It’s no company at all, when people know nothing and say nothing,’ she muttered.

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Emily Bronte

However , it’s over, and I’ll take no revenge on his folly – I can afford to suffer anything, hereafter! Should the meanest thing alive slap me on the cheek, I’d not only turn the other, but I’d...

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Emily Bronte

You know that I could as soon forget you as my existence!

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Emily Bronte

What kind of living will it be when you - Oh, God! Would you like to live with your soul in the grave?

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Emily Bronte

I love the ground under his feet, and the air over his head, and everything he touches and every word he says. I love all his looks, and all his actions and him entirely and all together.

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Emily Bronte

I gave him my heart, and he took and pinched it to death; and flung it back to me. People feel with their hearts, Ellen, and since he has destroyed mine, I have not power to feel for him.

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Emily Bronte

They forgot everything the minute they were together again.

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Emily Bronte

It is for God to punish wicked people; we should learn to forgive.

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Emily Bronte

I wish I were a girl again, half savage and hardy, and free... Why am I so changed? I'm sure I should be myself were I once among the heather on those hills.

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Emily Bronte

I hate him for himself, but despise him for the memories he revives.

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Emily Bronte

Time brought resignation and a melancholy sweeter than common joy.

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Emily Bronte

It was not the thorn bending to the honeysuckles, but the honeysuckles embracing the thorn.

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Emily Bronte

But there's this one difference: one is gold put to the use of paving-stones, and the other is tin polished to ape a service of silver. Mine has nothing valuable about it; yet I shall have the merit of...

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Emily Bronte

She went of her own accord,' answered the master; 'she has a right to go if she please. Trouble me no more about her. Hereafter she is only me sister in name: not because I disown her, but because she...

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“Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.”

― Dr. Seuss